Crown Coping Virgin - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 36 Old 07-24-2009, 08:58 PM Thread Starter
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Crown Coping Virgin

Okay guys, I'll admit it, I've always used miters with my crown molding. Recently I coped some baseboard and really liked how it turned out. I'm giving it a try with crown, but I'm cheating with the use of the easycoper (www.easycoper.com).

After trying a couple copes I was surprised at how little material on the coped piece actually touches the full piece. I always assumed that full thickness of the coped piece would butt up against the other. (There's a pic to explain what I'm saying). Is that the way all coped crown is, or is that just because of the back cutting angle of the easycoper?

Thanks for the input guys.
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post #2 of 36 Old 07-24-2009, 10:13 PM
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CD,
It's due to the backcutting angle. You'll have a small edge to touch the mating piece. Cut the coped piece a hair long so you can spring it into place for a tight fit. For crown, as compared to baseboard, you have to be careful that it is properly seated at the ceiling wall joint. If you rock one or the other the joint may not close up. They both have to be on the same plane.
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post #3 of 36 Old 07-25-2009, 04:37 AM
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from the picture it looks like you coped an outside corner? in that case you need to only cope inside corners. you should know that, just in case.

then the cope part that comes out would be correct.
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post #4 of 36 Old 07-25-2009, 06:24 AM
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Quote:
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from the picture it looks like you coped an outside corner? in that case you need to only cope inside corners. you should know that, just in case.

then the cope part that comes out would be correct.

From the picture it looks like an inside corner to me. I don't think I'd spend the money for a coping jig. After you do one or two, you get the hang of it pretty quick. With such a narrow blade, it's getting the "feel" for the angle and movement.






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post #5 of 36 Old 07-25-2009, 09:18 AM Thread Starter
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It's definitely an inside corner (the backside of an inside corner--which is the part I'd never seen before).

Sounds like that's the way it's supposed to end up--just a thin edge touching the adjoining piece. (It does look nice and tight on the front side).

Cabinetman, Do you cope with a jigsaw and or coping saw? The jig made it really fast with a jigsaw--maybe a two minutes for each cope.

Thanks.
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post #6 of 36 Old 07-25-2009, 12:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by C&D Woodcraft View Post

Cabinetman, Do you cope with a jigsaw and or coping saw? The jig made it really fast with a jigsaw--maybe a two minutes for each cope.

Thanks.


I learned with a coping saw, but have tried a jig saw. Jig saw is a bit bulky and the blades are wider than coping blades. I prefer doing them by hand.






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post #7 of 36 Old 07-25-2009, 09:19 PM
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CD,
I use a porter cable scroll saw, model 7549 to cut my copes. It's an older model with a very small cutout on the base plate with an adjustable guide block on either side of the blade. I cut the majority of the wood pretty close to the line and finish up with a rat tail file. Once I get warmed up with the first few pieces, I can cut a cope joint and file it in about 30-40 seconds. Most of the newer scroll saws have a huge hole in the base plate. I always blast the tool reps at the shows about this and they don't understand why anyone would want an almost solid baseplate without the big hole until I explain it to them. It does take a little practice and you have to watch where your fingers are at all times so you don't pinch them or nick them.
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post #8 of 36 Old 08-09-2009, 09:55 AM
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Try it with a coping saw. Try it a few times. If you don't like it go back to the easy coper (which is actually a pretty cool jig). I also prefer to cope mine with a coping saw. takes longer, but always seems cleaner to me.
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post #9 of 36 Old 08-15-2009, 02:25 AM
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Coping crown moulding

I use a tablesaw to cope. After cutting the compound angle, take several in-cuts 90 degrees to the joint, then carefully drag the moulding sideways across the blade. You can get close, keep the blade low for a sharp back angle, then finish off with a 4" angle grinder with a sandpaper disc. Fine finish with file or emery board. Works for me. Yea power tools!
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post #10 of 36 Old 08-15-2009, 11:00 AM
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If you have a considerable amount to do and you use a jigsaw that will accept it, you may want to look into a Collins Coping Foot - http://collinstool.com/base.php?page...oping_foot.htm. It is about the only alternative to a coping saw that really speeds up the process and provides great results.
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post #11 of 36 Old 08-21-2009, 01:36 PM
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When you work alone you need a hangar for the other end of the crown molding. They are very easy to make. Hang it on a 7 sinker nail fasten one end go to the orher and put a nail in it. Slide the hangar up off the nail and finish nailing the molding.

Will send photos as soon as I get the attachments figured out.
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post #12 of 36 Old 08-21-2009, 03:09 PM
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When you work alone you need a hangar for the other end of the crown molding. They are very easy to make. Hang it on a 7 sinker nail fasten one end go to the orher and put a nail in it. Slide the hangar up off the nail and finish nailing the molding.

Will send photos as soon as I get the attachments figured out.

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I found working alone to use these braces that are sold by HF. The ends have gimbaled rubber pads. Adjustable height. They work great. In the pic below it's shown holding up a backer for crown.
.







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post #13 of 36 Old 08-29-2009, 05:50 PM
 
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test
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post #14 of 36 Old 09-10-2009, 06:41 PM
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use a coping saw and learn to back cut you will never go back to miter nothing,it's a skill but you can learn it,if my car wasn't in my shop i would give ya a tutorial ,
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post #15 of 36 Old 09-24-2009, 09:24 AM
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I am alittle confused by the photo.
why am i seeing so much meat on the white piece. if you backed cut it i should only be seeing the profile
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post #16 of 36 Old 09-24-2009, 09:47 AM
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I am alittle confused by the photo.
why am i seeing so much meat on the white piece. if you backed cut it i should only be seeing the profile

WELCOME TO THE FORUM

If you are referring to this photo:
.

.
The piece on the right just dead ends ot is just short of the corner, no backcutting on that piece. The piece on the left is profile and backcut to fit. The view in this photo is like you are in the corner looking out to the backside of the mouldings.






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post #17 of 36 Old 09-24-2009, 10:15 AM
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I am surprised that you do not know of this man, Basswood, and this technique..............

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post #18 of 36 Old 09-24-2009, 04:51 PM
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that video looks cool but noisy and messy.
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post #19 of 36 Old 09-24-2009, 10:09 PM
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that video looks cool but noisy and messy.
Didn't they say something like that about skill saws?
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post #20 of 36 Old 09-25-2009, 08:03 AM
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Man, last summer my first mistake was doing oak crown for the in-laws as my first crown project. My second mistake was thinking that I could cope crown that doesn't have a constant rise profile; the geometry just doesn't work.

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