Butted + mitered baseboards - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 1Likes
  • 1 Post By Deena Lawrence
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 11 Old 03-02-2020, 10:43 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2020
Posts: 8
View Deena Lawrence's Photo Album My Photos
Butted + mitered baseboards

Hi to all, thanks in advance for perspective. I am replacing the casings and baseboards in my condo and going for simple and minimal. I've decided to go 5.25 x .6875 for the baseboards in a plain craftsman style MDF and 3.5 x .59375 for the door casings. I'm attracted to clean lines and have done a bit of reading. I've decided to butt the joints around the doors and in inner corners and miter the outer corners.



Any advice, perspective, potential challenges, things to bear in mind, etc? I haven't worked with MDF or mitered baseboards before.



Deena
Deena Lawrence is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 Old 03-02-2020, 11:34 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 5,696
View FrankC's Photo Album My Photos
For best appearance outer corner are mitered, inner corners are coped:

http://benchnotes.com/Coping%20Joints/coping_joint.htm

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

FrankC
http://sawdustmaking.com
http://woodworkerglossary.com
FrankC is offline  
post #3 of 11 Old 03-02-2020, 02:08 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2020
Posts: 8
View Deena Lawrence's Photo Album My Photos
Yes thank you, I am planning on as mentioned, inside butted, outside corner mitered. Any perspective on that scenario greatly appreciated.
Deena Lawrence is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 11 Old 03-02-2020, 04:28 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Adirondacks
Posts: 85
View Frost's Photo Album My Photos
If your baseboard has no profile and is a simple board, then a butt joint on inside corners is, in effect, a cope so nothing wrong there. The issue I see is that your baseboard is thicker than door casings. Usually it's the opposite such that the baseboard dies into thicker casings, but to each their own . MDF paints great but you'll need to pay attention to sawn edges, you may want to sand and paint those before installation. Now that I think of it, mdf does not tolerate moisture well, so you'd be well served to prime all 4 sides before installing , particularly the edge sitting on the floor. just in case you do occasional mopping. I'm sure you'll do fine, good luck.
Frost is offline  
post #5 of 11 Old 03-02-2020, 04:41 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 5,696
View FrankC's Photo Album My Photos
As you enter the room the baseboard on the wall facing you should be butted into the corner and the one along the side coped to it so any openings in the joint don't show.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

FrankC
http://sawdustmaking.com
http://woodworkerglossary.com
FrankC is offline  
post #6 of 11 Old 03-03-2020, 08:23 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 705
View gj13us's Photo Album My Photos
Just curious--why are you working with decimals that work out to 11/16 and 19/32? It makes life more complicated.
gj13us is offline  
post #7 of 11 Old 03-04-2020, 12:57 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Cyprus
Posts: 378
View sunnybob's Photo Album My Photos
MDF dust is the most dangerous of all the wood dusts. Its so fine you can barely see it even when youre looking for it and its mostly made of chemicals.

Take special care to cut it as outside as possible and wear a good mask, then change your clothes and shower afterwards.
Metric inches...... the very worst of all measurements.
I suspect the OP usually works in Metric and has used a calculator to cater for this mostly american audience.

SunnyBob
my projects can be viewed here
http://www.pbase.com/john_cooper/bob...dwork_projects
sunnybob is offline  
post #8 of 11 Old 03-05-2020, 09:25 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2020
Posts: 8
View Deena Lawrence's Photo Album My Photos
It makes life easier for me....
gj13us likes this.
Deena Lawrence is offline  
post #9 of 11 Old 03-05-2020, 09:26 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2020
Posts: 8
View Deena Lawrence's Photo Album My Photos
I think too that I will be routing splines into the corners no matter butted or mitered. I want strong joints that look good.
Deena Lawrence is offline  
post #10 of 11 Old 03-06-2020, 12:03 PM
CharleyL
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Central North Carolina
Posts: 299
View CharleyL's Photo Album My Photos
I'm not a fan of MDF for much of anything. Moisture and humidity do bad things to it. In a non air conditioned space, expect swelling and disintegrating of the MDF over time. If your baseboard is just flat with no molded top edge, coping is still a good idea, and a bit easier to do. Just cut the board that will butt up against the mating board at a slight angle of a few degrees cope. When you join this to the mating board, if the corner of the room isn't a perfect 90 your joint will show no gaps as it wood if the room corner is slightly more than 90.

For center joints between corners, I miter both pieces so that one overlaps the other. Doing this makes the joint less visible if it doesn't fit perfectly together.

For door frame trim, you just have to be as perfect as you can with your joinery.

Charley
CharleyL is offline  
post #11 of 11 Old 03-20-2020, 02:12 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 225
View phaelax's Photo Album My Photos
If it's a simple or plain molding, a butt joint on the outside might work better in some instances, such as walls that aren't square. It'd be easier shaving one flat edge to match up than mitering some weird angle on two pieces. Just my 2 cents after doing it to my 80 yr old crooked as **** house.
phaelax is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome