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post #1 of 11 Old 09-01-2010, 11:49 PM Thread Starter
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Built in liquor cabinet

I am looking to build a built in, between the studs open shelf rack for bottles behind my bar. I am planning to remove about 48" of one of the studs to connect two stud bays and making the cabinet span across the now open two stud bays, so it would measure 48"x48" recessed into the wall between the studs. My question is, can I use solid wood to frame the sides, top and bottom and then plywood for the back? I want to use the solid wood for side panels because some of the edges will show, but I also know that is seems that solid wood is more reactive to humidity changes than plywood. I want to make sure it will not warp. Thanks for any help or advice!
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post #2 of 11 Old 09-02-2010, 07:33 AM
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Is 3 1/2" -4" (The depth from surface to back) deep enough for this??? Is this a supporting wall?? If yes, the opening needs to be supported with additional framing, so solid wood or plywood will both work. You can use thinner plywood than solid wood to add space.
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post #3 of 11 Old 09-02-2010, 08:00 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks Bill,
It is 2x6 construction in the wall, so it lends a bit more space than 2x4. I do not think it is load bearing, but was going to put a header and footer supports at the top and bottom of the opening just to be sure. Also, I don't think it is load bearing as it is a wall that encloses the area under the stairs in my basement.
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post #4 of 11 Old 09-02-2010, 08:34 AM
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You could use solid wood or plywood, as long as the gap is supported. If you choose plywood, just edge it with a strip of solid wood.






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post #5 of 11 Old 09-02-2010, 09:29 AM
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If it is 2X6 construction, it could possibly be a plumbing wall or load bearing.

I would check into that before begining.

Scott
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post #6 of 11 Old 09-02-2010, 04:21 PM Thread Starter
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Scott,
Many of the walls in my house are 2x6", however you do bring up a very good point. The sink behind my bar is very close to this wall and would be very possible to have plumbing in there. What would be the best way to check where the pipes are? I will try to follow them from under the bar, but not sure how far I will get. I guess I could shrink the size of the cabinet to one stud bay, but how would I figure out which stud bay without opening the wall? If indeed there are pipes in there that is.
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post #7 of 11 Old 09-02-2010, 04:43 PM
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Are you in the basement?
If so, what type of ceiling do you have?
Can you get access to the top of the wall?

Other than that you'll need to open the wall to see inside.

Who knows you might get lucky, or you could move the plumbing.

Do you have access behind the wall, if so you could open it up there to see what you have.

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post #8 of 11 Old 09-02-2010, 11:54 PM Thread Starter
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Scott,
I do not really have access to either the ceiling or the back side of the wall. I will do more investigating tomorrow and see if I can figure it out. The more I think about it, the more it makes sense the plumbing would be in this wall though.
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post #9 of 11 Old 11-15-2010, 09:41 PM
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Not enough wood movement at this width (cab depth) to be concerned with.
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post #10 of 11 Old 11-15-2010, 11:40 PM
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Here's what you are looking for...

www.inwallcabinets.com

They actually build these to be stuck in the wall with nothing more than F-26 or Liquid Nails along the studs and the casing. I wouldn't install it that way, but it can be done.

Here's an old fireman trick: Bearing walls run parallel to the longest sides of your house, perpendicular to the floor joists and roof trusses. If you know which way they go, you can easily identify every bearing wall in the house. At my construction job we've actually REMOVED entire bearing walls, using large headers to take up the slack. So you can cut a big opening in a bearing wall, BUT you have to make sure that your "new" system for directing the load to the ground is in place and functioning BEFORE you begin cutting out the old studs.

In other words, you can go simple and easy, or big and expensive.

As far as plumbing goes, figure out where the water comes in the house and follow it to the sink in the most logical way.... which is probably above the basement ceiling and then drops down right behind the sink. It will take a bit of guessing, but you can get an idea before you tear into a wall. It does not make sense to me that plumbing would run out of the ceiling in a wall that either holds up the staircase or is party to it.

But I could be wrong...

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post #11 of 11 Old 11-16-2010, 01:25 AM
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As far a finding pipes, the better stud finders often have settings for finding pipes and electrical. Expect to pay about $60 if you want one that works well.
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