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post #1 of 16 Old 12-10-2016, 06:49 PM Thread Starter
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Built in level

Hi all. Building a bay window bench/rad cover/ storage unit. 100+ year old house. Original plaster walls. There is a 1 1/2" discrepancy from floor to window sill within the 8 foot span (left floor to window measurement is 1 1/2" lower than right floor to window measurement). There is an old radiator in the middle. My plan is to build it in 3 sections. A basic shaker rad cover in the middle and then floating (I believe is the correct term) panel "top loading storage" boxes on the left and right, all coming together to form a seamless built-in. I can only do minor adjustments on site, the main body must be built in shop. I am going mostly glue less and using pocket screws for easy on site adjusting. I need suggestions from you experienced folk. I have never wrestled with such an uneven space before. I typically just build things as square as I can get them, but that will not work here. I have built most of the middle rad cover section already, minus the legs and top. Thanks!
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post #2 of 16 Old 12-10-2016, 07:06 PM
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haven't seen a sketch....

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Hi all. Building a bay window bench/rad cover/ storage unit. 100+ year old house. Original plaster walls. There is a 1 1/2" discrepancy from floor to window sill within the 8 foot span (left floor to window measurement is 1 1/2" lower than right floor to window measurement). There is an old radiator in the middle. My plan is to build it in 3 sections. A basic shaker rad cover in the middle and then floating (I believe is the correct term) panel "top loading storage" boxes on the left and right, all coming together to form a seamless built-in. I can only do minor adjustments on site, the main body must be built in shop. I am going mostly glue less and using pocket screws for easy on site adjusting. I need suggestions from you experienced folk. I have never wrestled with such an uneven space before. I typically just build things as square as I can get them, but that will not work here. I have built most of the middle rad cover section already, minus the legs and top. Thanks!

I would do everything possible to take up the difference in the legs or at the bottom. Anything or gap that shows between the cabinet and the window will be immediately visible and you won't be able to hide it. :frown2:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #3 of 16 Old 12-10-2016, 08:33 PM
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Do the cabinets have toe kick space that you could use to hide the extra space? When we installed my new kitchen last year, we discovered that the floor was 3/4" lower in one corner. We installed the cabinets with the tops level and then used thin paneling in the toe kick to hide the wedge shaped gap.

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post #4 of 16 Old 12-10-2016, 09:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Confused View Post
Hi all. Building a bay window bench/rad cover/ storage unit. 100+ year old house. Original plaster walls. There is a 1 1/2" discrepancy from floor to window sill within the 8 foot span (left floor to window measurement is 1 1/2" lower than right floor to window measurement). There is an old radiator in the middle. My plan is to build it in 3 sections. A basic shaker rad cover in the middle and then floating (I believe is the correct term) panel "top loading storage" boxes on the left and right, all coming together to form a seamless built-in. I can only do minor adjustments on site, the main body must be built in shop. I am going mostly glue less and using pocket screws for easy on site adjusting. I need suggestions from you experienced folk. I have never wrestled with such an uneven space before. I typically just build things as square as I can get them, but that will not work here. I have built most of the middle rad cover section already, minus the legs and top. Thanks!
Did you ever consider leveling the house? If the floor is 1 1/2" in eight feet you have bigger issues than your bench.
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post #5 of 16 Old 12-11-2016, 08:28 AM Thread Starter
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Did you ever consider leveling the house? If the floor is 1 1/2" in eight feet you have bigger issues than your bench.
Hahaha, yea I thought the same thing. The main problem being the window sill in this case. It has warped/dipped down towards the floor in the one end. Looks to be some old water damage from an old and since replaced window.
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post #6 of 16 Old 12-11-2016, 08:34 AM Thread Starter
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Do the cabinets have toe kick space that you could use to hide the extra space? When we installed my new kitchen last year, we discovered that the floor was 3/4" lower in one corner. We installed the cabinets with the tops level and then used thin paneling in the toe kick to hide the wedge shaped gap.
This is a possibility on the ends but due to the radiator I need open legs in the middle for an air flow gap. Maybe with wider legs I can hide some sort of system like what you mention. Good idea. Thanks!
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post #7 of 16 Old 12-11-2016, 08:42 AM
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Hahaha, yea I thought the same thing. The main problem being the window sill in this case. It has warped/dipped down towards the floor in the one end. Looks to be some old water damage from an old and since replaced window.
That's what I meant. It sounds like their is some rot in the framing. I realize it's a lot of work but often you can just add to framing where there is rot. Left until it collapses makes for a huge job.
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post #8 of 16 Old 12-11-2016, 08:55 AM Thread Starter
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Anyone think heavy duty leg lifters may help me out? Like the type you would use on a work bench or table saw?
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post #9 of 16 Old 12-11-2016, 09:01 AM Thread Starter
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That's what I meant. It sounds like their is some rot in the framing. I realize it's a lot of work but often you can just add to framing where there is rot. Left until it collapses makes for a huge job.
I completely agree. This issue should be addressed but it's not my house and the owner (a friend of mine) understands the issue. So I need to just work around it for now. Do you think I could use leg lifters?
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post #10 of 16 Old 12-11-2016, 10:21 AM
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Are you saying .....

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Originally Posted by Confused View Post
Hahaha, yea I thought the same thing. The main problem being the window sill in this case. It has warped/dipped down towards the floor in the one end. Looks to be some old water damage from an old and since replaced window.
So, is the floor level and the window sill sloped to one side? It may be easier... to pull the sill off and shim the low side up, I donno? OR is the entire window askew in the opening? That's a huge job, but may be worth it in the long run. Probably not for this time of year though. Is the window a double hung? Do the windows slide easily?

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #11 of 16 Old 12-11-2016, 10:30 AM
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I completely agree. This issue should be addressed but it's not my house and the owner (a friend of mine) understands the issue. So I need to just work around it for now. Do you think I could use leg lifters?
If what you are building is something you might take with you and use in another house then the leg levelers would be a good option. If you are going to leave it I think it would just be easier to build it to fit the location.
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post #12 of 16 Old 12-11-2016, 01:22 PM
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Sounds like some builders I have seen over the years. Sold cabinetry for 2-1/2 years and never saw a square or level on a jobsite.
Good advice here and several options. Good luck and let us know how it turned out.

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post #13 of 16 Old 12-11-2016, 05:58 PM
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If all else fails ....

Make your cabinet square and even off the floor, like you would ordinarily. Make an attached or removable vertical backboard that covers the gap between the top of the cabinet and the widow sill. If you can't see the gap, it won't matter... heh ...heh.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #14 of 16 Old 12-11-2016, 07:47 PM Thread Starter
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Make your cabinet square and even off the floor, like you would ordinarily. Make an attached or removable vertical backboard that covers the gap between the top of the cabinet and the widow sill. If you can't see the gap, it won't matter... heh ...heh.
Thats is crazy as I was thinking that earlier! At least if I understand your concept I was:). You mean a sort of lip that is sometimes found on the back of a solid bench? Sort of butt stopper? Like an inch or two high? Was thinking I could snug it up against my piano hinges. I am a total novice at installations and any and all advise from you guys is much appreciated. Thank you much.
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post #15 of 16 Old 12-11-2016, 09:26 PM
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Yup!

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Thats is crazy as I was thinking that earlier! At least if I understand your concept I was:). You mean a sort of lip that is sometimes found on the back of a solid bench? Sort of butt stopper? Like an inch or two high? Was thinking I could snug it up against my piano hinges. I am a total novice at installations and any and all advise from you guys is much appreciated. Thank you much.
That's what I had in mind..... a butt stop or back stop... what ever. It should be tall enough to cover the gap and still allow the lid to open.
:smile3:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #16 of 16 Old 12-11-2016, 10:11 PM Thread Starter
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That's what I had in mind..... a butt stop or back stop... what ever. It should be tall enough to cover the gap and still allow the lid to open.
:smile3:
Yes I think that is genius woodthings. Genius in it's simplicity and problem solving. I will run this idea by the homeowner.
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