Built-In Kitchen Cabinet Stripping & Restoration ... Let Me Draw on Your Expertise - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 6Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #21 of 93 Old 04-12-2018, 12:14 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 97
View Lovegasoline's Photo Album My Photos
Door Gaps:

(in the bottom pic of base cabinet doors, I've removed the floor threshold plate that fits under the doors. I believe a floor refinisher had bumped this cabinet with his sanding machine and knocked it out of square. I'm considering replacing the face frame).
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC06090.jpg
Views:	29
Size:	32.8 KB
ID:	355417  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC06089.jpg
Views:	37
Size:	46.1 KB
ID:	355425  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC06093.jpg
Views:	24
Size:	39.5 KB
ID:	355433  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC06071.jpg
Views:	34
Size:	59.9 KB
ID:	355441  

Lovegasoline is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 93 Old 04-12-2018, 12:18 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 97
View Lovegasoline's Photo Album My Photos
Some Cabinet door wood defects:

Most of these defects appear to be from the stripper attacking the panel's veneer.

Next to last pic with the chunk of wood missing has been filled with Bondo.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC06623.jpg
Views:	22
Size:	68.2 KB
ID:	355449  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC06624.jpg
Views:	28
Size:	76.2 KB
ID:	355457  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC06647.jpg
Views:	28
Size:	85.2 KB
ID:	355465  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC06635.jpg
Views:	21
Size:	63.3 KB
ID:	355473  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC06645.jpg
Views:	27
Size:	74.6 KB
ID:	355481  

Lovegasoline is offline  
post #23 of 93 Old 04-12-2018, 03:38 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
The original face frames are made of Poplar which is considered a paint grade wood by most.
The side of the cabinet appears to be Birch. Is this plywood? If there is plywood in these cabinets they may not be as old as I first thought. One thing for sure, the previous paint and caulk jobs were about as sloppy as it gets.

The hinge pictured looks to be very standard and I think you can find an exact replacement at a good hardware specialty store unless you want to totally change out to a more modern cabinet hinge.

The crack between the side panel and the face frame is concerning because the FF is nailed to this side panel and must be secure. The doors swing from the FF and you donít want the FF to continue loosening and the crack growing. I would clean the crack thoroughly and insert glue before sevuring down tightly with at least 3 finish screws on each side. Using a power drill, I think the finish screws will pull the crack together. I would drill a pilot hole slightly smaller than the screw first. The finish screws can be recessed and filled over.
If
Youíre doing a jam up job in getting this kitchen back in shape. Looking good.

Also, in a previous post I recommended attaching a strip to the bottom of a door to hide a crack. After looking at the design of the door, I change my mind because of endgrain on the two door side ends. Add the strip to the faceframe as you originally planned.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
Toolman50 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #24 of 93 Old 04-12-2018, 09:20 PM
Senior Member
 
mmwood_1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: corvallis, Oregon
Posts: 1,151
View mmwood_1's Photo Album My Photos
So, I have a question for you....you do not own this place. You have taken on an overwhelming amount of work. WHY? Are you getting free rent for a year, or something like that? I'm having a hard time imagining why you are doing this to begin with. :)
mmwood_1 is offline  
post #25 of 93 Old 04-12-2018, 09:40 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovegasoline View Post
Door Gaps:

(in the bottom pic of base cabinet doors, I've removed the floor threshold plate that fits under the doors. I believe a floor refinisher had bumped this cabinet with his sanding machine and knocked it out of square. I'm considering replacing the face frame).
I see a couple of things in the bottom picture.
1. There appears to be a slot for a pull-out cutting board
2. You say you are considering replacing the FF on this cabinet because itís knocked out of square. The existing FF is not balanced. The stile on the left is wider than the right stile. If you replace it, you can balance it with matching stiles.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
Toolman50 is offline  
post #26 of 93 Old 04-12-2018, 10:12 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovegasoline View Post
Here's a short list of questions regarding these cabinets
(I'll get some pics and specs up shortly):

1) Hardware: I can't seem to locate replacement hinge hardware of the same dimension and hole pattern as the originals. I don't want to put the old, corroded, stiff, unattractive hinges back on. I'm looking for either polished brass or brass with a slight patina, aged look. Other than this forum, is there another place recommended to inquire about hardware?

From the pictures, the old hardware looks to be standard hinges you can still get from a good hardware specialty store. If the screw holes donít line-up, I would fill the old holes and install the new hinges.

2) Gaps: There are areas where the face frame is separated from the case and exploratory soft blow hammering suggests that seating them together isn't in the cards. There's about 1/8" - 3/16" gap in a couple areas. I've started to Bondo one gap (the face frame has a bead detail where it meets the case). Is that a sound solution? I've used Bondo for some minor gaps on the face frame pieces and to fill in some other defects.

In another post I suggested:
Clean the crack thoroughly, squirt glue into the crack, drill 3 spaced pilot holes slightly smaller than the screw used, use a finish power screw to drive three 2Ē screws slightly below the surface of the FF. This will pull the crack closed. Fill the screw holes.

3) Face frame tuning: how best to straighten up the inside of the face frames need some attention? There are fixed shelves that come right up to the face frame, so any fenced tool would need to clear the shelving edges.

Use a straight edge to draw a new square line on the front edge of the FF. Use a small block plane where possible and sharp chisel and rasp where the block plane doesnít work.

4) Door-to-door lip fitting : if I need to adjust the rabbet where the cabinet doors meet and overlap one another what's the best tool for that and how best to approach it?

A rabbet can be easily extended with a pass over a table saw. If you have no TS, you will need to set up a fence and use a router.

5) Door-to-Frame tuning: some gaps are too big how to remedy that? Glue a thin strip of wood on the interior of the face frame?

Yes

6) Door panel and veneer damage: Peel Away #1 paint stripper (caustic) although needing at least two applications and being a royal PITA (needing multiple neutralizing stages of acidic water after removing the stripper) is still the best in my experience for getting through the dozens of layers of latex and oil paint. But it doesn't stop there and it attacks the cabinet door panels, which apparently have a veneer, and in some areas has split the surface veneer of the panel. Any suggestions how to repair this? I'm using Bondo (lol, I'm getting into the Bondo) to patch a lot of wood defects on this project and I'm thinking of hitting these areas with it as well.
Bondo is probably the best option to cover and seal these veneer cracks.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
Toolman50 is offline  
post #27 of 93 Old 04-13-2018, 01:39 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 97
View Lovegasoline's Photo Album My Photos
A few more pics of some defects and problem areas:

-Drawer from base cabinet
-Door frame shows a gap between molding pieces. Is it best to fill that with latex caulk after priming?
-The remaining images are of the base cabinet

The drawer is one of the two base cabinet drawers, thoroughly beat out. I have wood and Blumotion soft-close drawers slides and will make two new dovetailed drawers to replace the two originals. The two drawers were the only elements I was planing to replace with newly fabricated items. However, as the scope of work has slowly increased I've cut out the old base cabinet counter top (I used a multitool with bi-metal blade to cut through the nails) and will replace it with a butcher block counter top piece I've had laying around. I have to explore edge profiles and my router bits, it might be nice to retain the original profile. Otherwise, I'll just do something like a very light chamfer. I'm not sure how decorative profiles look in butcher block as opposed to solid wood.
Of course, the base cabinet is also completely beat out. The drawer runners have long since shat the bed, and the drawers just get shoved in/out. ToolMan50 yes there are the remnants of what looks to be a cutting board slot, I can rebuild that and make a cutting board as well. The mortise and tenons are what's kept the cabinet standing all these years. And the stiles are unbalanced, I've not minded that as I'm used to it, I suppose I could balance them out however I'd lose the vertical continuity of the 2" wide left stile that runs to the ceiling. I suppose I'm going to go forward and replace the face frame, which will be a first for me. I'm a little hesitant because the whole enchilada seems in such questionable integrity ... it may be one of those things that once you touch something, it starts unraveling and whatever it's connected to starts to come undone, sort of like pulling a down feather that's sticking out of a jacket, when you pull it another comes out, and then another, and another ... a part of me doesn't want to start any invasive work (the drawers are different as they're independent items already detached).
In any case got some poplar today and will likely redo the face frame. I have to inquire but I think the Blumotion slides I have may need some blocking on the sides of the cabinet. I';m concerned the most about connecting the face frame to the case and also to the floor. Also, one nagging detail is the countertop's depth and height is made for circa 1920's life. If it taller and wider by an inch or two it would accommodate the lion's share of large microwaves; as it is I'm limited to mid-smaller sizes which typically are less featured and don't have the nicer design details of their slightly larger brethren. It would be nice to change the proportions slightly to accommodate that, but it would be difficult without further increasing the scope (lol!) and changing the cabinet doors above ... unless the counter top gets lowered more, which I think would be awkward.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC06661.jpg
Views:	34
Size:	69.4 KB
ID:	355521  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC06740.jpg
Views:	35
Size:	71.3 KB
ID:	355529  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC06659.jpg
Views:	37
Size:	76.3 KB
ID:	355537  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC06733.jpg
Views:	32
Size:	97.4 KB
ID:	355545  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC06732.jpg
Views:	35
Size:	65.2 KB
ID:	355553  

Lovegasoline is offline  
post #28 of 93 Old 04-13-2018, 02:26 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 97
View Lovegasoline's Photo Album My Photos
mmwood_1,
I'll get reimbursed for most of my supply costs but not my labor. The owner is meeting me from the other direction and doing some other repairs and renovation work that I requested, so when it's done the kitchen will look beautiful. No matter how bad I botch the cabinets I think they'll look significantly better. There will be detail in the kitchen's molding and profiles, light will slide along them like a laser beam defining shadow, edges, and curves. Paint will be satin smooth. The walls will be flat, sharp, the light will dance across them. Textures of wood floor and counter top, double deep farmer sink, some tiles, varieties of sheen on clear surfaces, gleaming hardware. I'll be here for several years more most likely. Beauty and a shared history. When I sit down and eat my eggs, I wont need a book, a laptop, or thoughts to distract me ... I'll have light dancing across surfaces to occupy my eyes ... a sense of balance, crispness, wholeness, integrity, stillness. The room will be a chamber of delight to just sit in. It's like classicism in a way: balance, proportion, an almost endless subtle refinement is possible, and each iteration, each smoothed surface, each trued line, each sharp edge, each curved profile deepens the harmonics in the mind. It's not the Parthenon, but it's what I've got around me and where I spend my time, where my life is lived. That's worth my energy. Ownership is overrated ... you 'own' things when the mind envelops them and merges with them in the present, in reality, in the moment. Otherwise, it's just the other 99% ...dreams, false hopes, pale fantasy, unreality, oppressive insatiable desire. You never really own anything anyway ... it's all impermanent, you lose everything that's dear to you, including all your loved ones ... and your life. All of this will be gone shortly enough. But in the interim, and for an instant, there's a rad kitchen!

The thing is that if the cabinets are replaced, which was offered, they'd likely be nondescript Home Depot items of the lower budget variety or something from that species. I'm used to these cabinets, there's a degree of nostalgia, and although they are just run of the mill cabinetry for the time they were made, they do have some vintage character and define the style of the kitchen. If they are replaced the vibe of the kitchen will go with them.

As the work progresses, I see how easy it would have been to just demo and rebuild the cabinets ...much cheaper, easier, and likely more satisfying. But I knew that going into this, which made committing so challenging.

The thing about this sort of undertaking, is you forget just how insanely epic stripping is (well, you never forget ... that stuff stays etched in your psyche ... but you tell yourself you can do it. You declare you can climb Everest) ... if you remember all the suffering from stripping enterprises in the past, in all their hideousness, you'd never do it again. The most important and necessary ingredient was the self deception that I might be able to knock this out in two or three weeks and a couple 5 gallon buckets of Peel Away. Without that I'd never have started.


PS: I'd once left a broken umbrella that was badly damaged and just about ready to be thrown away... on a porch in the rain. It was one of the cheapest umbrellas produced those ubiquitous $2 compact umbrellas sold in city bodegas and designed to fall apart after a dozen or so uses. A Buddhist monk left a note on it offering to to fix whoever's umbrella it was. I know the monk ... he was a mechanic in a former life. Still, it was mind boggling to read the note as the umbrella was so badly broken and was worth so little. I didn't take up his offer because - at the time - it seemed a futile endeavor.
mmwood_1 likes this.

Last edited by Lovegasoline; 04-13-2018 at 04:10 AM.
Lovegasoline is offline  
post #29 of 93 Old 04-13-2018, 02:27 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 97
View Lovegasoline's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by andr0id View Post
A) Those are far nicer than anything you would have been able to replace them with at any reasonable cost.
B) It looks rough stripped and patched, but if you do it right, they're going to look fantastic when done.
A) yeah ... gah!
B) thanks for the encouragement!
Lovegasoline is offline  
post #30 of 93 Old 04-13-2018, 02:37 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 97
View Lovegasoline's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman50 View Post
The original face frames are made of Poplar which is considered a paint grade wood by most.
The side of the cabinet appears to be Birch. Is this plywood? If there is plywood in these cabinets they may not be as old as I first thought. One thing for sure, the previous paint and caulk jobs were about as sloppy as it gets.

The hinge pictured looks to be very standard and I think you can find an exact replacement at a good hardware specialty store unless you want to totally change out to a more modern cabinet hinge.

The crack between the side panel and the face frame is concerning because the FF is nailed to this side panel and must be secure. The doors swing from the FF and you don’t want the FF to continue loosening and the crack growing. I would clean the crack thoroughly and insert glue before sevuring down tightly with at least 3 finish screws on each side. Using a power drill, I think the finish screws will pull the crack together. I would drill a pilot hole slightly smaller than the screw first. The finish screws can be recessed and filled over.
If
You’re doing a jam up job in getting this kitchen back in shape. Looking good.

Also, in a previous post I recommended attaching a strip to the bottom of a door to hide a crack. After looking at the design of the door, I change my mind because of endgrain on the two door side ends. Add the strip to the faceframe as you originally planned.
Thanks for your input, ideas, and encouragement.

The cabinets aren't ply, they're solid even thought they look deceptively like plywood.

I think I'd have to remove the face frame to get it cleaned out/cleared of roadblocks and snugged down. I've putty knifed up inside and soft-blow hammered it, but there's still a little gap. I'm hesitant to start 'pulling down feathers out' and if I do that I might as well rebuild the cabinet (it's just a face frame, left side, crown molding, three shelves, and some picture rail molding to support the shelf ends) but I want to just go quick and dirty on it. Maybe screw it down and Bondo it?

Unfortunately, the hinges do not seem to be standard. I've looked sporadically for many months and have not been able to find a single brass hinge with those dimensions and hole patterns. This is a big problem. Anyone have any idea how to go about locating some brass hinges that will fit?
Lovegasoline is offline  
post #31 of 93 Old 04-13-2018, 03:12 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 97
View Lovegasoline's Photo Album My Photos
Some butcher block I had lying around will be used for a new counter top.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC06736.jpg
Views:	31
Size:	69.1 KB
ID:	355561  

Lovegasoline is offline  
post #32 of 93 Old 04-13-2018, 07:24 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,986
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
I think you are getting the paint stripped better than it really needs to be. There was just too many coats of the old paint on there to do a good paint job over the top. You just need to get most of it off to be able to paint over it. You will need to provide good ventilation and wear a chemical respirator when sanding the cabinets. It's certainly to have lead in the paint. Lead was once used as a pigment in white paint.

Most of the voids and defects you could fill with a fiberglass filler. Where the casing is suppose to be nailed to the jamb you might take a piece of 2x4 and a heavy hammer and see if you can close the gap. Then it could be caulked.

Where the drawer, I think you could repair that one instead of building a new box. Since the bottom is thick and nailed to the underneath side you could remove it altogether. Then put some blocking around the inside of the box at the bottom and insert a piece of 1/4" plywood. Then because of the overall width of the box is too wide for side mount slides you could put undermount slides. I believe the thickness of the drawer bottom would give you enough clearance and if not it would be pretty close so you might be able to enlarge the opening a little to make it work.

The end of the door where it has wood rotted out I would try to chisel out as much of the rotted wood away as you can and cut a piece of solid wood to glue in there.

Some of the doors no longer fit the openings right. You might cut them where they are aliened with the openings again. The larger gap won't matter as much as being true to the opening.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #33 of 93 Old 04-13-2018, 11:43 AM
Senior Member
 
MT Stringer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Channelview, Tx
Posts: 2,642
View MT Stringer's Photo Album My Photos
I just now read through the thread. WOW! What an undertaking. I don't really understand all the details of your job and the owners part but...

If it were mine to do, I would chunk all of the doors and drawers and make new ones. Actually, I would buy paint grade doors from someone and have them delivered to the job site. Shaker style doors with 1/2 inch overlay and Blum soft close hinges would make that kitchen look a whole lot better. Your job will go faster and you can save your skill making for another day!

I did an overhaul just like I suggested for a friend, but of course he paid for everything. Twenty three doors and drawers. They were really happy with the end product. And thankfully, he had someone paint the cabinets.

Good luck.
Mike
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	2015-10-20 14.05.23.jpg
Views:	25
Size:	229.7 KB
ID:	355570  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2015-10-20 14.18.00.jpg
Views:	35
Size:	246.8 KB
ID:	355578  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2015-11-06 19.34.02.jpg
Views:	29
Size:	321.0 KB
ID:	355586  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2015-11-06 19.33.49.jpg
Views:	26
Size:	251.1 KB
ID:	355594  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2015-11-06 19.33.05.jpg
Views:	36
Size:	254.7 KB
ID:	355602  

MT Stringer is offline  
post #34 of 93 Old 04-13-2018, 11:53 AM
Senior Member
 
MT Stringer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Channelview, Tx
Posts: 2,642
View MT Stringer's Photo Album My Photos
Hmmm...I just noticed something in your pictures. The bottom cabinet (see your picture posted below) is a good candidate for an update. Modify it so it will contain two wide and deep drawers for pots and pan storage. You can thank me later! Or cuss me.

See the images I have posted. That is exactly what the homeowner wanted. I modified the cabinet and built new drawers. That is the two drawers next to my wife's knee in the picture.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	2015-10-07 17.51.33.jpg
Views:	31
Size:	163.3 KB
ID:	355618  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2015-11-06 19.34.02.jpg
Views:	22
Size:	321.0 KB
ID:	355626  

Attached Images
 
MT Stringer is offline  
post #35 of 93 Old 04-13-2018, 12:19 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovegasoline View Post

The cabinets aren't ply, they're solid even thought they look deceptively like plywood.

Cabinets were most likely made on-site (pretty much how they did it back then) and made before the availability of plywood.

I think I'd have to remove the face frame to get it cleaned out/cleared of roadblocks and snugged down. I've putty knifed up inside and soft-blow hammered it, but there's still a little gap. I'm hesitant to start 'pulling down feathers out' and if I do that I might as well rebuild the cabinet (it's just a face frame, left side, crown molding, three shelves, and some picture rail molding to support the shelf ends) but I want to just go quick and dirty on it. Maybe screw it down and Bondo it?
I would use screws to pull the frame to the sides and fill the screw holes.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
Toolman50 is offline  
post #36 of 93 Old 04-13-2018, 12:21 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
What about making changes to the blue topped cabinet to accommodate a new large microwave?
Itís got an outlet.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
Toolman50 is offline  
post #37 of 93 Old 04-13-2018, 01:04 PM
Senior Member
 
Pineknot_86's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 1,753
View Pineknot_86's Photo Album My Photos
FWIW, I think by the time you count the time and materials to strip and refinish, it would be cheaper to replace them. I sold cabinetry, factory and custom. We had a line of a flat panel cabinets that were hard to touch for price and quality. Sold several sets for rental or starter housing. Just remembered- that is a salvage place about 30 miles north. They buy KD cabinets from China. They assemble them or you can DIY. Lowe's has unfinished cabinets, too. Good luck.

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
Pineknot_86 is offline  
post #38 of 93 Old 04-13-2018, 02:21 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 97
View Lovegasoline's Photo Album My Photos
I'm not completely delusional ... my goal in the stripping was to essentially rid the cabinetry of it's ghetto vibe ... and anything more than that is simply icing on the cake. I will not have immaculate cabinetry but it'll be a large step up from what it was ... and it's all determine by how much more energy I want to put into it. If the cabinetry is a type of very modest (at best) jewel, their setting is also rising to the occasion ... so the entire space will register as a vast improvement.

Four skilled extra bodies skimming the walls today and tuning up the space produces a feeling like seeing light at the end of the tunnel (!)... if only they'd come to my rescue and take over the stripping operations
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC06786.jpg
Views:	18
Size:	70.3 KB
ID:	355730  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC06791.jpg
Views:	22
Size:	71.8 KB
ID:	355738  

MT Stringer likes this.
Lovegasoline is offline  
post #39 of 93 Old 04-13-2018, 02:44 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 97
View Lovegasoline's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pineknot_86 View Post
FWIW, I think by the time you count the time and materials to strip and refinish, it would be cheaper to replace them. I sold cabinetry, factory and custom. We had a line of a flat panel cabinets that were hard to touch for price and quality. Sold several sets for rental or starter housing. Just remembered- that is a salvage place about 30 miles north. They buy KD cabinets from China. They assemble them or you can DIY. Lowe's has unfinished cabinets, too. Good luck.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MT Stringer View Post
I just now read through the thread. WOW! What an undertaking. I don't really understand all the details of your job and the owners part but...

If it were mine to do, I would chunk all of the doors and drawers and make new ones. Actually, I would buy paint grade doors from someone and have them delivered to the job site. Shaker style doors with 1/2 inch overlay and Blum soft close hinges would make that kitchen look a whole lot better. Your job will go faster and you can save your skill making for another day!
Great post Mike and thanks for images and ideas.


As I wrote in my initial posts I knew going into this it would be cheaper, take much less time and energy, be magnitudes more pleasant, and most likely look better to just make new cabinets ... or conversely to keep the framing and to make new doors. It was a tough call to commit to move forward and strip them.

I've not done extensive cabinetry and never kitchen cabinets. This was a volunteer effort on my part and I wasn't sure how much the owner was willing to contribute, so a stripping operation although difficult, was realizable ... and without permission. Furthermore, access to fabricate full cabinetry may have been extremely difficult, or impossible, to do at present.
As I've gotten to know these cabinets intimately, I see just how minimal materially the built-in frame and cabinets are. There's very little to them. My thinking was that a few years down the road, for just a few hundred dollars in wood plus some hardware, I could rebuild these cabinets from scratch should I decide to.
Replacement drawers that I build now will be done with the thought of making them incorporable for any future refurbishment.
Lovegasoline is offline  
post #40 of 93 Old 04-13-2018, 03:18 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 97
View Lovegasoline's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
I think you are getting the paint stripped better than it really needs to be. There was just too many coats of the old paint on there to do a good paint job over the top. You just need to get most of it off to be able to paint over it. You will need to provide good ventilation and wear a chemical respirator when sanding the cabinets. It's certainly to have lead in the paint. Lead was once used as a pigment in white paint.

Most of the voids and defects you could fill with a fiberglass filler. Where the casing is suppose to be nailed to the jamb you might take a piece of 2x4 and a heavy hammer and see if you can close the gap. Then it could be caulked.

Where the drawer, I think you could repair that one instead of building a new box. Since the bottom is thick and nailed to the underneath side you could remove it altogether. Then put some blocking around the inside of the box at the bottom and insert a piece of 1/4" plywood. Then because of the overall width of the box is too wide for side mount slides you could put undermount slides. I believe the thickness of the drawer bottom would give you enough clearance and if not it would be pretty close so you might be able to enlarge the opening a little to make it work.

The end of the door where it has wood rotted out I would try to chisel out as much of the rotted wood away as you can and cut a piece of solid wood to glue in there.

Some of the doors no longer fit the openings right. You might cut them where they are aliened with the openings again. The larger gap won't matter as much as being true to the opening.

There are 12 cabinet doors (24 sides) and all but about 6 side sides have been stripped back. All the frames and cases have been stripped. Leaving some of the primer or paint on them is fine as after the scraping and sanding it wont telegraph through a new paint job. The next step is a deeper stripping of the profile details of rails ands stiles, which will just take some patience and is the last stripping operation left. Then some filling and patching; then tuning the refitting. Yeah, I've been using Bondo primarily and a touch of Ready Patch. (Btw, instead of stripping one technique I used a few years ago on some cruddy baseboards in a hallway was to skim coat them with Ready Patch and then sand the Ready Patch flush ... because they are at floor level and seen from 5'-6' away, they look perfect.)

The baseboards are all stripped. The sheet metal sink cabinet has been stripped except for some a few touch up spots ... and it's doors. For the latter I was planning to just grind them off and make two new doors from wood ... however, I think I'm going to revert to my 1st option which was to strip them and try filling/smoothing the dents with Bondo (if that doesn't go well I'll make new ones and get new hinges). It's a good area to practice my nascent body-filling skills and I can screw up without serious consequence. An educational opportunity.

The drawers are shot. I only posted the one pic but they are missing several tails from the dovetails (one joint is missing nearly all the tails). I've recently got some new soft maple for the drawers and it has been several years since I've cut dovetails or done any quality hand tool work ... so I'm actually looking forward to that ... it'll be fun as opposed to the labors of stripping. As mentioned, I've already sourced some extremely nice Blumotion soft-close slides for the two drawers. All of this is a sort of warm-up to get re-familiarized with my machinery and hand tools after a long sabbatical, to tune them up, plus make the acquaintance of some new tools (ex. I recently got a 100 year old Stanley #80 scraper and totally adore it), learn their use, improve my skillset, and set the stage for some furniture design and fabrication.

Uniformity of door-to-frame gaps are a concern, I'll tackle that at there tuning/fitting phase.

I've got exceptional respiration equipment (and have done damage there in the past), including acid gas canisters for the respirator, a supplied air system, plus a serious exhaust fan. This time around I got a correct pair of PVA gloves for dealing with the methylene chloride, instead of pickling & dissolving my hands in the inadequate PVC or rubber gloves.

I also have a seriously outfitted spray setup with top quality guns (but will likely brush on the cabinet finish) except for the metal sink. There's also a dumb waiter and other period details that have been stripped and will be sprayed. It's nice to keep a lot of the kitchen's stuff from the original era, for example I love the look of the cabinet latches (I'll need to source new brass ones) which would be lost with overlay doors.

Overall, it's getting knocked out.

The remaining obstacles are sourcing brass hinges (no luck at all on that and it's seeming hopeless) ... and finding a suitable crown molding.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC06650.jpg
Views:	26
Size:	72.5 KB
ID:	355746  


Last edited by Lovegasoline; 04-13-2018 at 03:32 PM.
Lovegasoline is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Full Overlay Pocket Door Kitchen Cabinet kktalker Design & Plans 1 09-29-2017 06:34 AM
Painting newly built kitchen cabinets zort General Woodworking Discussion 2 09-02-2017 11:35 AM
Painting newly built kitchen cabinets zort Wood Finishing 4 08-22-2017 10:08 PM
Using open locks and part associations to draw an upper range cabinet in eCabinets Scott Marshburn Woodworking Videos 0 01-20-2016 05:11 PM
Prepping for a Kitchen Cabinet Demo-...? MT Stringer Trim Carpentry & Built-Ins 3 09-28-2015 06:13 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome