Baseboard Measuring-Inside Corners - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 16 Old 09-13-2014, 04:20 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 10
View daveward's Photo Album My Photos
Baseboard Measuring-Inside Corners

Let's say you are applying the first piece of 3"+ tall baseboard to a wall with two inside corners and the baseboard is that preprimed mdf style material. You have the length to do it in one piece but leaving the first cut a little long only proves the board is too long to fit and you don't have enough hands to keep the entire piece flush to the wall even if it would fit. Is there any clever way to sneak up to the right cut without so many trial cuts? Thanks!!
daveward is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 Old 09-13-2014, 04:33 PM
more bacon?
 
Ttharp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Walker, Louisiana
Posts: 719
View Ttharp's Photo Album My Photos
Tape measure works like a charm. If you have trouble accurately measuring in the bend of the tape, cut a block to a known dimension like 12 inches. Then place the block in the corner and measure to it then add back its length.
Ttharp is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Ttharp For This Useful Post:
FrankC (09-13-2014)
post #3 of 16 Old 09-13-2014, 06:21 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Illinois
Posts: 697
View mako1's Photo Album My Photos
Learn to cut and measure correctly..I always cut base like that 1/16" long and spring it into place by nailing at one end first and working to the other.If it's hardwood and a stain grade I cope it.
mako1 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 16 Old 09-13-2014, 07:55 PM
Senior Member
 
Chamfer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Mechanicsville, VA
Posts: 1,450
View Chamfer's Photo Album My Photos
Learn to accurately measure. I always cut inside corners a little long, then trim to fit.
Chamfer is offline  
post #5 of 16 Old 09-14-2014, 01:18 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 10
View daveward's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by mako1 View Post
Learn to cut and measure correctly..I always cut base like that 1/16" long and spring it into place by nailing at one end first and working to the other.If it's hardwood and a stain grade I cope it.
I certainly get the spring idea...I suppose what I worry about is that sometimes the pressure at the ends will "dig into" a not perfectly square corner and the second mitered piece to be added doesn't line up exactly...because the first piece end extends a hair past the exact corner, if that makes sense. Using the spring it in and nail the first piece before knowing how that second piece will fit seems risky.
daveward is offline  
post #6 of 16 Old 09-14-2014, 07:48 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 10
View daveward's Photo Album My Photos
Re: the set-up. I suppose I should have mentioned that both ends have already been cut at 45 degree miters, obviously the key objective is to place the first piece so it's not too short, not too long where it mates with the second piece.

If it really is merely accurate measuring corner to corner, no problem. I had imagined, for example, that two mitered scrap pieces might be cut and each tacked into a corner, as if they represented the second piece to be applied and the last piece...and then measurements taken from their innermost corners. Unnecessarily complex it would seem. Thanks for the good ideas.
daveward is offline  
post #7 of 16 Old 09-14-2014, 09:18 AM
Senior Member
 
Chamfer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Mechanicsville, VA
Posts: 1,450
View Chamfer's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by daveward View Post
I certainly get the spring idea...I suppose what I worry about is that sometimes the pressure at the ends will "dig into" a not perfectly square corner and the second mitered piece to be added doesn't line up exactly...because the first piece end extends a hair past the exact corner, if that makes sense. Using the spring it in and nail the first piece before knowing how that second piece will fit seems risky.



You are correct in this thinking. Its not a good idea to spring bigger pieces of trim into place. This will most of the time cause exactly what you mentioned, digging into the wall and your next piece not matching up correctly. You can sometimes get away with it with long shoe molding or beading, but generally you want a nice snug fit without digging in the walls.

If working with out of square walls you will have to adjust your angles accordingly to get the right fit. It may be more or less than a 45. When working with out of plumb walls you have to shim to get the correct fit. Its always a good idea to cut scrap pieces (a foot or less) of both inside and outside corners so you know your next piece will fit correctly.
Chamfer is offline  
post #8 of 16 Old 09-14-2014, 09:57 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Maine
Posts: 1,932
View Hammer1's Photo Album My Photos
Sounds like you are mitering the inside corners, not coping them. A little spring action is used with coping but not with other cuts. If you cut 45s for inside corners, they aren't going to fit in most cases. There are situations with complex profiles where coping doesn't make sense. Usually the inside corners will be mitered but not at 45, it's often more like 43 so the front that shows fits.

Learning to use a tape isn't easy for rookies on inside measurements. A trick is to measure from one corner a known amount, say 10'. Make a small mark then turn your tape and measure from the other corner to the 10' mark, add that to 10'.
Hammer1 is offline  
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Hammer1 For This Useful Post:
fire65 (09-14-2014), FrankC (09-25-2014), mikeswoods (09-14-2014)
post #9 of 16 Old 09-14-2014, 10:14 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 5,666
View FrankC's Photo Album My Photos
I will sometimes use the two stick method, lay one across the back tight to one corner and another in front of it tight to second corner, mark the end of the second stick on the face of the first, remove sticks and lay on top of the material to be cut.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

FrankC
http://sawdustmaking.com
http://woodworkerglossary.com
FrankC is offline  
post #10 of 16 Old 09-19-2014, 08:31 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 20
View sheperd80's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammer1 View Post
Sounds like you are mitering the inside corners, not coping them. A little spring action is used with coping but not with other cuts. If you cut 45s for inside corners, they aren't going to fit in most cases. There are situations with complex profiles where coping doesn't make sense. Usually the inside corners will be mitered but not at 45, it's often more like 43 so the front that shows fits.

Learning to use a tape isn't easy for rookies on inside measurements. A trick is to measure from one corner a known amount, say 10'. Make a small mark then turn your tape and measure from the other corner to the 10' mark, add that to 10'.
This ^


Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk
sheperd80 is offline  
post #11 of 16 Old 09-20-2014, 07:44 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 12,471
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by daveward View Post
I certainly get the spring idea...I suppose what I worry about is that sometimes the pressure at the ends will "dig into" a not perfectly square corner and the second mitered piece to be added doesn't line up exactly...because the first piece end extends a hair past the exact corner, if that makes sense. Using the spring it in and nail the first piece before knowing how that second piece will fit seems risky.
Cut them both before you do any nailing if you are that worried.

What I do is cut a couple of short pieces with the 45 degree on the left end of one and the right end of the other. These pieces are used for the trial fit at each corner as I go along.

I still measure close and sneak up on the final cut. Of course I am not trying for speed as I am working on my own property.

George
GeorgeC is offline  
post #12 of 16 Old 09-21-2014, 01:23 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 10
View daveward's Photo Album My Photos
Yes, thanks, the small pieces for test fitting really does make sense...especially if the corners have lot's of drywall mud irregularities. I don't have any worries about "sneaking up" except that 12 or more feet of that baseboard back and forth to the saw makes me wonder if there's a better way. Like cutting the darn thing in the middle and working on one scarf joint instead of two 45 degree ends. Well...that won't work, I still have two 45's to get right, don't I? And now i'm talkin' to myself. Thanks guys.
daveward is offline  
post #13 of 16 Old 09-21-2014, 07:54 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 26,059
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
You could measure the inside corner but it would make it more difficult. Lets say the molding is 1/2" thick, measure the length of the wall and subtract 1/2" for each miter. If you are going from an inside miter to an outside miter it would measure the same length as the wall. On a 45 degree angle the front side of the miter will be equal to the thickness of the molding.

I measure the wall and mark the line on the back side of the molding and cut it point to point when going between two walls.
Steve Neul is online now  
post #14 of 16 Old 09-21-2014, 05:15 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 49
View imdskydiver's Photo Album My Photos
Measure wall. Cope one end and stick it In.
imdskydiver is offline  
post #15 of 16 Old 09-25-2014, 11:44 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 5,666
View FrankC's Photo Album My Photos
You have got some good advice on how to measure the board, in reality if that board is the first one you see when you enter the room it doesn't have to be an exact fit if it is painted, you should be coping the boards that run in to it at both ends. A gap of 1/16 or so will be covered by the coped board and the top edge can be filled if necessary.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

FrankC
http://sawdustmaking.com
http://woodworkerglossary.com
FrankC is offline  
post #16 of 16 Old 10-05-2014, 03:39 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 5
View Hondsil's Photo Album My Photos
Cope one end. Its the easiest and fastest. You are guessing angles. I always measure from left side of the room to the right. Cope my right side. Cause I'm right handed and then your last piece you cut is your first piece and keep going.
Hondsil is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Baseboard Trim and Baseboard Heat leungw Trim Carpentry & Built-Ins 9 05-21-2013 09:29 PM
Sanding Inside Corners Jophus14 Wood Finishing 3 12-01-2012 08:52 AM
Cutting inside corners Fudwrecker Design & Plans 4 05-04-2011 11:15 PM
chamfering inside corners Rossraven Tips, Tricks, & Homemade Jigs 4 09-03-2010 09:41 AM
Measuring tape - not only for measuring niki Shop Safety 9 12-08-2007 02:01 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome