Any trick to make this joint? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 35 Old 08-04-2008, 03:25 PM
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wow this is the first thread I have read where I have no idea where I lost it. I was hanging in there foe a while then it was like it all went blank. I'll try reading it again when my head stops hurting. lol
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post #22 of 35 Old 08-05-2008, 06:03 PM
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How about one of those spring loaded corner chisels you use to square up the corners of a mortise created by a router tool. Or an actual corner chisel (pricier). Both are simply lined up with your pencil marks and wallopped with a mallet (malay, that french word for hammer).

Ed
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post #23 of 35 Old 08-05-2008, 06:41 PM Thread Starter
 
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It's good to see this thread come back to life. Still looking for the "Trick" or simple saw set method to make it quick and fool proof. Keep them coming guys.
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post #24 of 35 Old 08-05-2008, 08:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MinConst View Post
It's good to see this thread come back to life. Still looking for the "Trick" or simple saw set method to make it quick and fool proof. Keep them coming guys.

In all actuality, that particular joint traditionally would visually be just a butt joint where the shelf would butt the vertical.



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post #25 of 35 Old 08-05-2008, 09:06 PM Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
In all actuality, that particular joint traditionally would visually be just a butt joint where the shelf would butt the vertical.
Yes I know. A butt joint is how I've been doing them. I just want to make it a little more refined.
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post #26 of 35 Old 08-06-2008, 02:14 PM
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I don't get it. Where's the joint? Where's the rest of this thread?
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Bud

"Veggie burgers aren't bad if you put enough meat on them"
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post #27 of 35 Old 08-06-2008, 02:36 PM Thread Starter
 
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TS this is page 2 of the thread. At the bottom right of this message or the last one in the thread you will see a < 1 2 click on the 1 for the first page of this thread.
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post #28 of 35 Old 08-06-2008, 03:01 PM
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What we have hee-yah, is a fay-yuh ta comm-yunicate.
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post #29 of 35 Old 08-08-2008, 08:48 AM
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You could try either a metal cutting counter sink or a "center drill" in a router. You'd need to either use a router table with a sled or make up a jig to insert your edge molding into (on edge) then run the router across the jig.

http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/NNPDFF...=196&PMCTLG=00

Both center drills and counter sinks come in a variety of angles, shank sizes and cutting diameters. Make sure you get a 90 degree cutting angle if you want to try it. And make sure it is right hand cutting and not left hand, especially if you like the looks of the center drills better. If it does not say, then it is right hand cutting.

Hovering over the MSC order number with the mouse will bring up a little window with text big enough to read.

I'd probably try the aircraft type 3 flute first. It probably has a more aggresive cutting angle than those designed for cutting steel. It's also cheap being HSS (high speed steel) If it works well, and you are doing enough of them, you could buy a cobalt one which will resist heat better than HSS. Cutting wood causes more heat than cutting steel (at the right feeds and speeds for the application).

Use in your lowest RPM router.

Check the pages before and after the one linked to for more options. If the link doesn't work go to page 196

Let us know the outcome!! Posting a thread for advice is a two way street.

cheers,
Jim

Last edited by clampman; 08-08-2008 at 09:15 AM.
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post #30 of 35 Old 08-22-2008, 09:21 AM
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After figuring out what it is you want to do, I agree with Cabinetman's first post. Very carefully use a knife and chisel. Too simplistic? Maybe, but the set-up time and chance of error using power tools is too great in my opinion. The fact is that I have had to make this joint on several occasions and had no problem with either time or quality after practicing it a few times. By and by, someone mentioned Norm from Yankee Workshop? Bless his heart and I would work with him any day of the week, but I remember him and Tommy saying how great it was to use biscuits for normal 2-1/4" casing around a door. You can make something too complicated by far.
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post #31 of 35 Old 08-22-2008, 01:02 PM
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I do a lot of repair on furniture. Specifically, old veneer. There are as many ways to cut and match as there are people doing it. The way I was taught was to cut what you need on a scroll-saw with a fine blade. I have a miter gauge on mine that will allow me to cut the 45's your attempting. Short of that I'd use a Veneer saw in a jig.



Just my 2

Richard

Last edited by Shamus; 08-22-2008 at 01:38 PM. Reason: said Jig saw instead of Scroll saw...
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post #32 of 35 Old 09-07-2008, 09:52 PM
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i agree with shamus,a schroll, band or handsaw will do what you want with great results.
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post #33 of 35 Old 09-26-2008, 11:19 PM
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Use a chamfer bit

If I understand what you are doing:
You have bead molding that you want to cut a "V" into the edge, not the face or back, of the molding so that the shelf channel is exposed and you can slide the shelf in and out or just look good; either way. Do I have it?

If so I think you can set up a jig with a router and a grooving bit to get this effect. You could then cut multiple strips of molding at one time for mass production. I did something like this for a bottle rack I created were I had to cut about 30 channels. You can buy grooving bits in several different angles and types to match the angle you are cutting your shelf edge to.

Chris

Last edited by Chris_Old_House; 09-26-2008 at 11:34 PM. Reason: used the wrong bit name: should be grooving bit
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post #34 of 35 Old 09-26-2008, 11:41 PM
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Just cope it. Basically, a butt joint, with a coped edge - which blends in the joint, rendering it as minimally apparent.
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post #35 of 35 Old 10-08-2008, 02:55 PM
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Measure out a few pieces of stock then stack them together so you can make one pass through multiple pieces. Use a v-groove blade in a moulding head on a radial arm saw. The cut will be perfectly verticle and straight and there's no need to re-adjust for multiple cuts. Use a sacrificial piece in the back to prevent tearout and a stop block if the cuts will be in the same location. You can use the same molding head in a table saw for other projects.

You would use cutter #1144.

Moulding Head Cutter

Oh yeah, I like that idea alot.
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