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post #1 of 12 Old 01-01-2012, 03:42 PM Thread Starter
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Another kitchen cabinet question

What do you guys use for toe kicks? Build a separate base l and level that first then put cabinets on the base and finish it off with wood to match cabinets? Or cut the side panels of the cabinet box for a toe kick? I was thinking of doing a separate base out of 2x4 and leveling it first then covering it up with a finished board.
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post #2 of 12 Old 01-01-2012, 03:54 PM
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What do you guys use for toe kicks? Build a separate base l and level that first then put cabinets on the base and finish it off with wood to match cabinets? Or cut the side panels of the cabinet box for a toe kick? I was thinking of doing a separate base out of 2x4 and leveling it first then covering it up with a finished board.
I usually make separate toe kicks. That gives me a better yield out of a sheet. For kitchen, vanities, and utility cabinets, I use A/C fir 3/4" and cover with a fascia.






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post #3 of 12 Old 01-01-2012, 04:08 PM
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Prefer separate toe kicks also.

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post #4 of 12 Old 01-01-2012, 06:45 PM
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It depends on the look, whether you want a recessed toe kick on the finished end of the cabinet or not. If not, notch the cabinet side and have it go to the floor. If doing a kitchen where cabinets may go down two or more walls, you can get into trouble with a separate toe base that has to be fit to an uneven floor, kept level in two directions, square with the walls and still meet properly in the corners. It can make for extra and fussy work. It's usually easier to include a rough toe kick in the cabinet construction, attach the cabinets to one another, level them as a unit, then use a continuous face board on the toe to cover any differences, shims and, maybe, fit to an uneven floor. All the manufactured cabinets I install are built this way, saves a lot of grief. Quite often, furniture base, which is typically 3/4" with a profiled top edge is used on the front of the toe kick and returned around the exposed, finished end of a cabinet. If you don't like that look, the notch in the finished end can be mitered for the toe kick cover.

PS, another thing to keep in mind are appliances like dishwashers and ranges. You have to plan ahead with a separate toe kick to allow scribing and fitting while still maintaining the necessary under counter height. If you have cut off too much, the DW or a slide in style range may not fit.

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post #5 of 12 Old 01-01-2012, 10:07 PM
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If doing a kitchen where cabinets may go down two or more walls, you can get into trouble with a separate toe base that has to be fit to an uneven floor, kept level in two directions, square with the walls and still meet properly in the corners. It can make for extra and fussy work.
I've done toe kicks loose and integral to the cabinet. Loose toe kicks make for installing on two or more walls easier IMO. The differentials in floor heights lend to loose toe kicks, as they can be leveled independently. Or, they can be screwed together. Loose toe kicks become an advantage as they provide additional ability to be shimmed. They can be shimmed to the floor, or between the top of the toe kick and the cabinet.

Being loose, and if needing scribing, they are easier to handle than trying to manipulate a cabinet that has an integral toe kick.

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It's usually easier to include a rough toe kick in the cabinet construction, attach the cabinets to one another, level them as a unit, then use a continuous face board on the toe to cover any differences, shims and, maybe, fit to an uneven floor.

All the manufactured cabinets I install are built this way, saves a lot of grief.
It's a cost saving to configure cabinets that way.

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PS, another thing to keep in mind are appliances like dishwashers and ranges. You have to plan ahead with a separate toe kick to allow scribing and fitting while still maintaining the necessary under counter height. If you have cut off too much, the DW or a slide in style range may not fit.
That's a good reason for loose toe kicks. It allows shimming under the toe kick and between the TK and the cabinet.






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post #6 of 12 Old 01-02-2012, 09:11 AM
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This is an open forum, anyone can give their opinion, take it or leave it.
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post #7 of 12 Old 01-14-2012, 11:03 PM
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Loose or attached is an opinion. I have done both but only seperate when the architect request it.

As far as the saving on sheet goods....I spend more time on the install with separate than with integrated. My labor is worth more than my material....
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post #8 of 12 Old 01-15-2012, 08:25 AM
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Whatever you do or whichever way you do it, be sure that you use a material that will NOT be susceptible to water damage.

I am getting ready to replace all of the toe kicks in my kitchen because some have absorbed water and have swollen and cracked.

George
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post #9 of 12 Old 01-15-2012, 09:18 AM
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I like the separate toe kick also especially with floor to ceiling cabinets. Just a note with separate toe kicks, if your bottom rail is 1 1/2" or more, you will need to add to the kick that much above 3/4 inch or you will have a short toe kick. And that's my opinion.

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post #10 of 12 Old 01-15-2012, 10:30 AM
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I like the separate toe kick also especially with floor to ceiling cabinets. Just a note with separate toe kicks, if your bottom rail is 1 1/2" or more, you will need to add to the kick that much above 3/4 inch or you will have a short toe kick. And that's my opinion.
Are your partitions in the boxes flush with the bottom of the rails? Or do you allow the face frame to hang down past the box?

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Last edited by jlord; 01-15-2012 at 10:34 AM.
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post #11 of 12 Old 01-29-2012, 11:06 PM
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I like seperate toe kicks.
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post #12 of 12 Old 01-29-2012, 11:26 PM
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Cabinet sides are set back 3 1/2 " and 4 " high at kick level. Then after installing the boxes I have loose 5" high toe-kick that I simply rip or scribe to floor whatever it turns out to be after installing cabs level. On inset cabs or overlay same set up. A lot of my inset jobs have furniture kick mainly in non working areas and really just for looks.The bottom rail in this case is 6" and a 4" decorative base is applied after install leaving a 2" rail which is the dimension of all my beaded inset frames. The only time I have ever done what you are suggesting is on a pantry or oven can that wont stand up in the kitchen . Then and only them will I install a separate base lift cabinet onto level and plumb but still put separate toe kick across front. Also make lengths of Toe kicks long enough so you don't have seams
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