Any Plumbers - Need advice on leaking pipe thread? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 6 Old 06-20-2012, 07:23 PM Thread Starter
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Any Plumbers - Need advice on leaking pipe thread?

I spent almost 2 hours in 103˚F heat with the sun burning my head while replacing a new pressure regulator and forgot to seal the very last thread. I think the sun finally got to me because I didn’t have on a hat. The whole thing is underground with 3 lines connecting and making it very difficult to connect it all together.

I can dig up some more dirt and cut a section of pipe out so I can unscrew the fitting and seal it, but I’m hoping there is an easier way like epoxy or something. Anyway it’s worth a shot to at least ask before cutting. It not that it’s too difficult, it’s just that I’m getting to old to be laying on my belly connecting up pipes in this heat. LOL


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Last edited by Sleeper; 06-20-2012 at 07:26 PM.
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post #2 of 6 Old 06-20-2012, 08:15 PM
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Is this for a yard sprinkling system? Or on paid city water.

If on free water there are several things you can do. If it is a very small leak just forget it.

If you can get the joint area dry then epoxy may work.

It does not look like it would be much more, if any more, work to do the digging and repair the threaded fitting properly.

I have one place in my yard where a sprinkler pipe has become cracked. It is in what is now a very difficult place to work in because in 35 years tree roots have really hemmed it it. I solved the problem by encasing it in concrete. That would not be practicable for what you are showing.

I once repaired the entrance line for my city water with an inner tube, stainless steel clamps and silicone seal. When I moved from that place 7 years later it was still holding.


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post #3 of 6 Old 06-20-2012, 08:34 PM
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The right way would be to cut the line somewhere so you can unscrew the fitting and properly seal it. If you just want it sealed without much work, try some of that epoxy putty. Turn off the pressure then give it a few minutes to dry, then pressure it up and it should stop the leak.
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post #4 of 6 Old 06-20-2012, 08:49 PM Thread Starter
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Is this for a yard sprinkling system? Or on paid city water.

If on free water there are several things you can do. If it is a very small leak just forget it....
Thanks, its city water which is expensive and living in the desert we get fined for overwater usage. Its leaking about a gal an hour, but luckily itís leaking on the sprinkler side of the valve so I now have it turned off. The builder originally had the sprinkler system before the regulator putting a little over 80psi on the sprinkler valves.

We were replacing the valves constantly because they were always blowing out and leaking. The valve box was always under water causing the old regulator to rust out and it wasnít working anymore causing all the faucets inside the house including the dishwasher to spring leaks. I decided to put in a new regulator and re-plumb it so everything would be regulated at 50 psi.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Itchytoe View Post
The right way would be to cut the line somewhere so you can unscrew the fitting and properly seal it. If you just want it sealed without much work, try some of that epoxy putty. Turn off the pressure then give it a few minutes to dry, then pressure it up and it should stop the leak.
I probably will end up digging a portion of line up to be able to work with it and fix it proper, but Iím not looking forward to it. Itís at my daughterís house and it takes all my time up driving over there to fix anything because I never have the right stuff and usually have to make numerous trips to HD.

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post #5 of 6 Old 06-20-2012, 09:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Sleeper
Thanks, its city water which is expensive and living in the desert we get fined for overwater usage. Its leaking about a gal an hour, but luckily it’s leaking on the sprinkler side of the valve so I now have it turned off. The builder originally had the sprinkler system before the regulator putting a little over 80psi on the sprinkler valves.

We were replacing the valves constantly because they were always blowing out and leaking. The valve box was always under water causing the old regulator to rust out and it wasn’t working anymore causing all the faucets inside the house including the dishwasher to spring leaks. I decided to put in a new regulator and re-plumb it so everything would be regulated at 50 psi.

I probably will end up digging a portion of line up to be able to work with it and fix it proper, but I’m not looking forward to it. It’s at my daughter’s house and it takes all my time up driving over there to fix anything because I never have the right stuff and usually have to make numerous trips to HD.
Dig it up, and if possible raise the valves and manifold up and out of the ground and install them in a doghouse next to the house. Install a blind, air filled, pipe at the end of the manifold to absorb the energy when the valves shut off. They are being destroyed by the water hammer because the valves close really fast.

If you can't get it above ground where you can work on it because of restrictions on your property, get a water hammer arrester, and install it. Be sure to install some unions so you can pull things apart easily.

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post #6 of 6 Old 06-20-2012, 09:40 PM Thread Starter
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Dig it up, and if possible raise the valves and manifold up and out of the ground and install them in a doghouse next to the house. Install a blind, air filled, pipe at the end of the manifold to absorb the energy when the valves shut off. They are being destroyed by the water hammer because the valves close really fast.

If you can't get it above ground where you can work on it because of restrictions on your property, get a water hammer arrester, and install it. Be sure to install some unions so you can pull things apart easily.

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Thanks, it’s funny but raising it up was exactly what the house inspector said to do when my daughter bought the house. I didn’t think much about it at the time, because I thought maybe I could run a drain pipe from the bottom to a lower level of the yard if need be.

I didn't think about the Air Hammering. I had to install one in my house when I bought my last Washer/Dryer. Should have thought of it.

It’s right in her front yard and I would have to come up with some clever idea of how to make it look good. I’ve been watching YouTube videos on laying brick and looking for a place to practice. Maybe I’ll make something out of brick. She’s a pretty picky about the front of her house and I don’t know what she’ll say about that. She already complaining about the big hole I have.

JohnnyB
Iím a die hard DIY guy. Donít tell me to hire someone for what I can do myself.

Last edited by Sleeper; 06-20-2012 at 09:49 PM.
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