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-   -   White oak lounge table with brass elements - Scandinavian design (https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f13/white-oak-lounge-table-brass-elements-scandinavian-design-173458/)

Christian S 07-09-2017 04:37 PM

White oak lounge table with brass elements - Scandinavian design
 
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Hi,

Just finished my first ever woodworking project. I've created a minimalistic lounge table of white oak. The legs are fixed to the table with a wedge joint. The wedge is made of oak, but the top 2-3 mm were chiseled out after to be replaced with brass. I used CE glue (superglue) to hold the brass in place.

Table dimension
- Length and width: 150 cm x 69 cm
- Table thickness: 1.9 cm (ended up thinner than planned)
- Height: 45 cm

The legs are angled outwards with 6 degrees or 8.6 degreed towards the table corners.

Finish: Wax-oil, natural.

Downside: The thickness of the table is probably a bit too thin, so time will show if it will hold up without sagging. The table thickness also make the table leg joint weaker than planned, so I will have to use the table with care. I can obviously strengthen with a support beam under the table, but I've decided to rather wait and see if it hold up.

Christian S 07-09-2017 04:40 PM

Process step 1
 
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As I don't have a jointer I uses a jig to use with my thickness planer to flatten the stock. I started off with 25mm x 250-300mm thick/wide rough planks. Final result was about 19mm thick and 120mm wide.

Christian S 07-09-2017 04:43 PM

Step 2
 
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Choose the right order of the planks for the table top.

Christian S 07-09-2017 04:49 PM

Step 3 - Drill the holes for the table legs
 
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On the drill press I measured up the correct angle. I also drew a guideline toward the end corner of the table to align up with the line on the sacraficial wood that I drilled into. This way I ensured a perfekt drill angle for all the four corners.

I also had to calculate the angle that I had to drill the holes at in reference to the guideline made toward the table corner. This was different from the angle wanted towards the short-end/long-end of the table.

I wanted 6 degrees towards the short-end/long-end. After a bit of calculations (took me about 3-4 hours to figure out the angle, with some help from a math forum). The angle needed was 8.4 degrees.

Christian S 07-09-2017 04:52 PM

Step 4: Glue together the boards
 
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I used Titebond III to glue together the boards. It stuck a lot quicker than expected and I nearly ran out of glue. It was also difficult to get the boards to align up 100 % (even though it worked fine, when I try tested with the clamps).

Christian S 07-09-2017 04:55 PM

Step 5: Plane the table top flat and do rough sanding
 
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I used my number 5 and 7 plane to plane the board flat. A tough job that probably took 2-3 hours, and then another 1-2 hours of sanding with 80 grit.

Christian S 07-09-2017 04:59 PM

Step 6: Use the lathe to create the table legs
 
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I create myself a template - I decided I wanted the table leg to be thinnest at the bottom, and the gradually increase the dimension to about 65% of the way up, before it reduced again. The part that was going to fit the 30mm drilled hole in the table top required the biggest attention. That has to fit the whole within 0.1 mm. I ended up making 5 legs, as I wasn't happy with the fit on one of them.

Christian S 07-09-2017 05:03 PM

Step 8. Cut the table top to dimension and table and tampre edge
 
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I wanted the table to look thinner than it actually is so I used the planes to taper? the edge. I left about 5mm of the 19 mm visible from the side.

I also used a handsaw to cut the table to the desired length of 150 cm.

Christian S 07-09-2017 05:05 PM

Step 9. Dry tested the table in my living room
 
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I then carried the table to the living room to test the looks, and the table height before wedging the table legs.

Christian S 07-09-2017 05:11 PM

Step 10: Connect the table legs
 
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I used Titebond I for the table legs as that is what I had at hand. First I glued the upper part of the table leg and the inside of the hole, before glueing the wedge and wedge hole. Then I hammered it down.

The wedge was set to be 90 degreed to the direction of the grain to ensure it would split when I hammered the wedge in. (thanks to the guys on this forum for letting me know - I was thinking of doing it differently)

After the leg and wedge had dried over night I then chiseled out a 3 mm slot (about the same size as the wedge), and used CA (superglue) to fix the brass piece (cut on the band saw from a 3.1mm x 31 mm x 300 mm piece that I bough on eBay)

Chiseling out the four slots in the table legs took be 2-3 hours, as I couldn't afford a mistake at this point. And even a 0.1 mm error would easily show.

Christian S 07-09-2017 05:14 PM

Step 11: Test of finish
 
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I wasn't sure what finish to have on the table, so I bought a two to test.

From top to bottom.
- thin layer of wax-oil natural
- white oil, rubbed off after about 60 seconds
- Nothing - natural wood
- thick layer of wax-oil natural (same as the top, just thicker layer).

I decided two use the thin layer of wax-oil, natural.

Christian S 07-09-2017 05:16 PM

Step 12: Apply finish
 
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The first photo is after the wax-oil is applied, then second photo before (don't understand how to decide the order of the photos)

Christian S 07-09-2017 05:20 PM

Final results
 
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Final results after one layer of wax-oil - I might apply another layer before concluding the project.

GuitarPhotographer 07-09-2017 07:33 PM

Nice job!

RogerC 07-13-2017 12:38 PM

Really nice work! I totally dig the minimalist design.

As you said, the thickness may pose a few problems later on, but I agree with your decision to just wait and see what happens.

Toolman50 07-13-2017 02:03 PM

Well done. Very good job of showing the progression of the build with pictures. Wedged legs turned out great.

Brian(J) 07-13-2017 02:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Christian S (Post 1706538)
Final results after one layer of wax-oil - I might apply another layer before concluding the project.

Just saw this today, thought you might be interested in this slightly similar design.

http://************/y9ysltat

http://************/ycccb2mo

Brian(J) 07-13-2017 02:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Christian S (Post 1706538)
Final results after one layer of wax-oil - I might apply another layer before concluding the project.

Just saw this today, thought you might be interested in this somewhat similar design.

http://************/y9ysltat

http://************/ycccb2mo

Catpower 07-13-2017 02:27 PM

Very nice work

woodnthings 07-13-2017 04:49 PM

That turned out beautiful!
 
There is one part I'm having trouble understanding which is the "splay" angle of the legs. In you first post above, you said:

The legs are angled outwards with 6 degrees or 8.6 degreed towards the table corners.

I also had to calculate the angle that I had to drill the holes at in reference to the guideline made toward the table corner. This was different from the angle wanted towards the short-end/long-end of the table.

I wanted 6 degrees towards the short-end/long-end. After a bit of calculations (took me about 3-4 hours to figure out the angle, with some help from a math forum). The angle needed was 8.4 degrees.


http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/attac...n-img_4136.jpg

Your radial arm drill press can rotate the head as well as the table. Was it necessary to do both to get the correct angle?

So, are the legs splayed in both direction OR a compound angle, right? You said that you had a lot of difficulty determining the angle, and I'm wondering how you arrived at what you ended up with. It would take some plane geometry IF they are splayed both ways or compound.

I see the following photo of your calculations ... scary!

Me, I would just hot glue a broom stick/dowel/extra leg to a plywood base, stand back and adjust it until I liked it and THEN determine the angle(s) with a Digicube. Then over to the drill press and make a test hole to see if I got my numbers right. Higher math scares me, but I like the challenge. I'm a "cut and fit" kinda guy. :wink2:


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