shop built router table - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 12 Old 10-30-2011, 09:51 PM Thread Starter
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shop built router table

Hey guys so today I built something that I have needed to make for a long time a router table. It is 48 inches long and 24 inches wide. The top is 3/4 mdf with waxed hardboard on top of that. Under the mdf I put a box made out of 2X3 to add strength. Right now it is just on my workmate but eventually I want to make a cabinet for it to go on. Since I did not want to spend any money on this project all the wood I used was scraps I did not get a plate for the router what I did is I routed out beneath the table about a 1/2 inch so the bits could fit through. I used it for about ten minuets tonight to cut a bunch of grooves in a project that had been on hold until I had a router table. I want to get a switch that is on the front of it to turn the router on and off but do not know what to get. The other thing I was wondering is that clamping the fence down is a pain and I was thinking about getting some t track and am looking for suggestions on how to do that.Overall I am happy with how this turned out and dont know why i put off making it for so long because it was easyer to make than i thought it would be. .
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post #2 of 12 Old 10-30-2011, 10:45 PM
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Hey man, great job! A couple of notes:

1. Instead of adding attachments linked to photobucket, why don't you copy paste the IMG code and paste it in the text box? That way it shows the full image and we don't have to click on it and have it open another window.

2. Definitely look into the t-track. Sometimes Rockler will put their kits on special with free shipping. I picked up a kit for $20 shipped. It'd come with plenty to do what you need and then some.

I'm in the process of building a router table out of scrap wood I had in my shop currently and will post a new thread here when I get it complete. Perhaps that would give you some ideas on how to finish yours. Nice job! It's a lot easier having the right tool for the job, huh?

Ut Prosim
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post #3 of 12 Old 10-31-2011, 12:15 AM
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Router tables are easy to build and have a million uses. Look around the forums here and you'll see several shop made ones.

Yours looks very useful. May I suggest that you add a vacuum port to connect a shop vac for dust collection? Routers make a ton of saw dust and it can build up quickly. Not only will it cause your router to burn out sooner, it can make your cuts become off due to saw dust between the table fence and the work.

If Woodworking is so much fun why isn't it called WoodFUNNING?

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post #4 of 12 Old 10-31-2011, 07:35 AM
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A couple of suggestions---

For the fence---- If you screw the fence to the table on the left side (one screw like a swivel pin)

and use a clamp only on the right you will be able to make adjustments very quickly.

Build an L shaped fence and box the left hand side---attach your vacuum hose to the left end of the box.

A word of caution---the screws holding the router into the MDF will vibrate their way through the board and cause the router to drop out.

Get a plate soon --in the mean time---check those screws for looseness every time you use it.---Mike----

Last edited by mikeswoods; 10-31-2011 at 07:39 AM.
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post #5 of 12 Old 10-31-2011, 08:17 AM
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Router tables can be very versatile. For a switch, a handy one very easy to use, (just plugs in) is on sale now...check it out. For an adjustable fence/fences, you could make an "L" configuration, and cut slotted openings in the bottom part of the "L". You can use "T" (tee) nuts under the top and a studded knob on top of the "L" for adjustment. The tee nuts can also be used in the top, and the router base can be bolted from the bottom, thus eliminating screws. This will hold you until you arrange for a lift out plate.








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post #6 of 12 Old 10-31-2011, 03:43 PM Thread Starter
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Hey thanks for the help. I tried to have the fence screwed in at one end and am confused because the fence is not going to be the same distance on both ends. Does that matter because I am not sure. Great idea about getting a plug in switch I will get one of those next weekend when I go to woodcraft. So far it works having it bolted to the top but I want to get a plate for it soon. How should I build the fence because the one I have now is just a piece of pine that I jointed because I wanted to get the grooves cut so I can put together the chest I am working on. I like the idea to have my shop vac hooked up to it because when I used it for a couple minuets there was saw dust all over. I know what you mean with it getting between the fence and the board and effecting the cut so what I was doing is blowing the top off with compressed air.
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post #7 of 12 Old 10-31-2011, 03:59 PM
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The fence can be just a straight one, made like an "L". Separate fences are convenient for jointing, but you can add a thickness shim on the outfeed side if you want to joint. You will need a cutout (like a half circle) in the middle for the bits.








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post #8 of 12 Old 10-31-2011, 04:04 PM
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Great job! A router table doesn't have to be anything fancy, just functional. You can modify it however you want. Most of your cuts only require a homemade fence anyway. Clamp it loose on one end, swing it to adjust the other end. Use playing cards, or paper, to sneak up on a dimension. No reason you cannot hold .001, if necessary.

Harrison, at your service!
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post #9 of 12 Old 10-31-2011, 06:14 PM
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As has already been suggested,

You could make the fence in the shape of an "L" and box in the left side. Either on the end of the box, or directly behind the router bit, add a connection for your shop vac.

If you have a Sears, Home Depot or Lowes near you then look in the shop vac area and you'll find an adapter that has a rubber flange with 4 bolt holes. Just cut off the reducers and bolt the remaining flange to the fence. Now connect your vac to the adapter.

You are looking for this thing....

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1...7&blockType=G7

http://www.lowes.com/pd_37045-20097-9068711_4294814062_4294937087_?productId=1085001&N s=p_product_prd_lis_ord_nbr|0||p_product_qty_sales _dollar|1&pl=1&currentURL=%2Fpl_Shop%2BVac%2BAcces sories_4294814062_4294937087_%3FNs%3Dp_product_prd _lis_ord_nbr%7C0%7C%7Cp_product_qty_sales_dollar%7 C1&facetInfo=

http://www.homedepot.com/Tools-Hardw...atalogId=10053

Cut away all the cone shaped end and bolt the flange to your fence using some caulk to seal it well.

You should also cut a small hole in the fence where you mount your bit. It needs to be a little bigger than your largest bit for clearance and at least an inch and a half tall. Just drill a hole and cut away material to make an opening. that leads into the vacuum area.

It does not matter if your fence does not adjust parallel to your table. As long as you can align the slot for the bit with the bit your cuts will come out fine. Check out some of the commercial router tables and you'll see that they adjust in different ways but do not all stay parallel.

What matters is that the fence is able to be adjusted to allow the bit to be buried deep enough into the fence to allow you to support the work and take small cuts to "sneak up on" your final cut. Trying to take full cuts in some cases can cause kick back and damage your work.

Take a look at this thread (about 2/3's down the first page) and you'll see how taking too deep of a cut with a router can ruin an otherwise perfect job.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f13/a...lry-box-30117/

If Woodworking is so much fun why isn't it called WoodFUNNING?

I've made a few videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/johnnie52

Last edited by johnnie52; 10-31-2011 at 06:19 PM.
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post #10 of 12 Old 10-31-2011, 06:20 PM Thread Starter
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thanks i like the idea of getting an adaptor to hook it up to the fence. thanks for telling me that it does not have to be parallel to the table because i was trying to make it parallel and that was a pain.i was wondering if i should i make the fence out of ply wood or real wood? the other thing i was wondering is that the boards keept trying to move away from the fence. what should i do about that.
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post #11 of 12 Old 10-31-2011, 06:23 PM
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Feather boards.... seriously.

Or like I said above, bury the bit in a slot in the fence and only take small passes until you reach the full cut.

If your shop is climate controlled, use a piece of hard wood. Otherwise use something like the Baltic Birch ply wood at least 3/4 inches thick.

If Woodworking is so much fun why isn't it called WoodFUNNING?

I've made a few videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/johnnie52
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post #12 of 12 Old 11-01-2011, 08:12 AM
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You can make a dandy fence out of some strips of good plywood---along with some square blocks to act as braces----Mine are usually about 3" tall and about 4" wide----

Solid wood will work but may twist a bit if you have a humid shop.
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