Reclaimed beveled glass window and reject cherry cabinet doors coffee tabl - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 13 Old 03-07-2012, 12:17 AM Thread Starter
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Reclaimed beveled glass window and reject cherry cabinet doors coffee tabl

My client had this old salvaged leaded glass window that they wanted made into a coffee table. They also had some solid cherry slab type cabinet doors left over from their kitchen remodeling and wondered if it could make it out of them. I told them "sure, I love challenges like this".

I had gathered all the pieces and hauled it back to my shop where it had sat for a few weeks when the client called to see how I was doing. The idea for what I was going to build popped into my head while discussing it with him on the phone. I told him it would be ready to pick up in a couple of days.

That is what I call motivation. I got it done in two days.

Bret
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Last edited by Lola Ranch; 03-07-2012 at 02:00 AM. Reason: typos
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post #2 of 13 Old 03-07-2012, 12:24 AM
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Awesome as always. Looks great.

That bowl was perfect right up until that last cut...
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post #3 of 13 Old 03-07-2012, 05:08 AM
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Awesome as always. Looks great.
+1

Bret, you never disappoint.
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post #4 of 13 Old 03-07-2012, 05:59 AM
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The distressed look fits well with the old leaded glass.
Nice combo.
I wold be concerned that the glass is not tempered, a tad, but if it won't see abuse, I suppose it's ok.
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post #5 of 13 Old 03-07-2012, 06:51 AM
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I make a lot of repurposed furniture items.
This is a perfect example of a client with a need, a purpose and a great piece for you to work with.

He couldn't have chosen anyone better to build this..
Well done, Bret

Learning more about tools everyday
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post #6 of 13 Old 03-07-2012, 07:22 AM
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Its gorgeous! So beautiful, I hate to second the tempered glass concern. Are your clients aware of this? Being subjected to gentle use goes a long way for safety, but there's no good way to avoid accidents
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post #7 of 13 Old 03-07-2012, 07:33 AM
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Beautiful piece.
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post #8 of 13 Old 03-07-2012, 08:24 AM
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I like that alot, nice job.

It's all fun and games until someone loses the Walnut.
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post #9 of 13 Old 03-07-2012, 08:40 AM Thread Starter
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Its gorgeous! So beautiful, I hate to second the tempered glass concern. Are your clients aware of this? Being subjected to gentle use goes a long way for safety, but there's no good way to avoid accidents
I've actually ordered a glass top for the table. You might notice on the top of the legs there is a little bit sticking up to capture the edge of the glass. I was concerned about the structural integrity of the leaded glass and also that it was uneven. I didn't order tempered glass. Maybe I'll talk to the client and see if I should get it tempered. Certainly a good suggestion.

Typically I do not get tempered glass unless it is in or near a door. If you think about it, most windows are not tempered. The coffee table has a perimeter of wood to help support the glass. It is debatable as to whether or not one would need tempered on this table.

Bret
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post #10 of 13 Old 03-07-2012, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Lola Ranch View Post
I've actually ordered a glass top for the table. You might notice on the top of the legs there is a little bit sticking up to capture the edge of the glass. I was concerned about the structural integrity of the leaded glass and also that it was uneven. I didn't order tempered glass. Maybe I'll talk to the client and see if I should get it tempered. Certainly a good suggestion.

Typically I do not get tempered glass unless it is in or near a door. If you think about it, most windows are not tempered. The coffee table has a perimeter of wood to help support the glass. It is debatable as to whether or not one would need tempered on this table.

Bret
Nice looking table...well done. Leaded glass panels look very nice, but fare better vertically as windows than as table tops. Structurally, A leaded panel like that can be weak as the panels can be separated under certain stresses...like minimal impact.

Once together, leaded glass panels cannot be tempered, but rather the individual sections could have been tempered before it was leaded together as an entire panel. The lead wouldn't with stand the heat, and the sections will shrink. Tempering gives glass more durability. Tempering is a safety factor, as the glass will break in small pieces, unlike untempered glass which can break in large sharp pieces.

I would suggest an upper and lower panel of tempered glass, with the leaded glass being in the center. If glass for a top like that is ordered, give the finished dimensions as they account for shrinkage.






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post #11 of 13 Old 03-07-2012, 11:50 AM Thread Starter
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[QUOTE=cabinetman;312976]Nice looking table...well done. Leaded glass panels look very nice, but fare better vertically as windows than as table tops. Structurally, A leaded panel like that can be weak as the panels can be separated under certain stresses...like minimal impact.

I have examined the leaded glass window and have deemed it full able to support itself on a horizontal application but did not feel it able support the weight of anything set on top of it aand that is why I designed it with a separate glass top which will cover the frame as well as the leaded glass.

"Once together, leaded glass panels cannot be tempered, but rather the individual sections could have been tempered before it was leaded together as an entire panel. The lead wouldn't with stand the heat, and the sections will shrink. Tempering gives glass more durability. Tempering is a safety factor, as the glass will break in small pieces, unlike untempered glass which can break in large sharp pieces."

I have never encountered a situation where the glass in a leaded glass window needed tempering. Building codes require tempered "or" leaded glass for door locations.

"I would suggest an upper and lower panel of tempered glass, with the leaded glass being in the center. If glass for a top like that is ordered, give the finished dimensions as they account for shrinkage."

A lower glass panel would not add any strength to the leaded glass panel unless your were to cut it so that it fit inside the wood frame and up against the leaded glass from underneath. Being that the leaded glass is structurally sufficient to support itself, the lower glass panel would be redundant.

All good points of discussion but IMHO I've made the correct decisions for this project. There are always other ways of doing things that would be satisfactory as well. I respect and appreciate your opinions.

Bret

Last edited by Lola Ranch; 03-07-2012 at 11:53 AM.
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post #12 of 13 Old 03-07-2012, 12:49 PM
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I have never encountered a situation where the glass in a leaded glass window needed tempering. Building codes require tempered "or" leaded glass for door locations.
You're correct. Usual codes cite glass at certain distances from the floor, or at bathroom windows in shower stalls.

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A lower glass panel would not add any strength to the leaded glass panel unless your were to cut it so that it fit inside the wood frame and up against the leaded glass from underneath. Being that the leaded glass is structurally sufficient to support itself, the lower glass panel would be redundant.
Since the panel is already framed, you're right, that adding a lower glass panel would require setting it into the frame to have close contact with the "sandwiched" piece. Figuring the thicknesses of the three pieces, may overwhelm the thickness of the frame. My suggestion for that lower panel is to minimize any downward movement of the leaded glass which could have the possibility of separating...(just from self weight...the gravity thing). Doing it would require some points of adhesion, like with some dabs of GE Silicone II if they could be inconspicuous.

But, since you gave the leaded glass a thumbs up for being appropriate as it will be used, that's good enough for me.





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post #13 of 13 Old 03-07-2012, 02:00 PM
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Really nice looking table, Bret. Well done... But then again we ALL expect that from you!

~tom "Ignorance is not a lack of intelligence - it's a lack of know-how"
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