Platform Bed Build - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 32 Old 10-08-2019, 07:20 PM
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...................... I saw several posts on the internet disclaiming that a direct planer to shopvac connection will only lead to an explosion of dust. So. I woodchipped out the front of the garage into the driveway................
A DISCLAIMER means it it NOT true.
I'm sure it might be possible but I have used large and small dust collectors for almost 40 years and never even had a close call. You ought to see what a screw can do to the steel shroud of a 4 bagger dust collector. I'm sure a spark has been generated. Anyway, I could not find anywhere on the web where it was proven as true. I would be more concerned if anyone is smoking in the workshop. THAT would cause a multitude of potential shop fires. Stacking 2 or more 'oil stain' soaked rags is a real potential fire starter. Ask me how I finally became a believer.

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post #22 of 32 Old 10-08-2019, 08:45 PM
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In the closeup picture showing jointing the board on the router table, the wood looks like red oak to me.

There are many species of oak and different parts of the country might call slightly different varieties of oak “white oak”. I don’t know for sure because I’m not in forestry. The white oak that I buy in Michigan is a beautiful brown color. Hard to tell from photos, but I wouldn’t call any of those boards white oak.
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post #23 of 32 Old 10-08-2019, 11:49 PM
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I tend to go with Terry above. thinking some of the boards are red oak.

Some look like red oak, would have to see a clear photo of end grain to make up my mind.

Terry ; in the south, some white oak will look almost like red oak. I can usually tell by the end grain. Anway, most white oak here is from very light to a medium to dark brown. pick up apiece you can also tell by the weight. red oak is fairly light compared to the much heavier white oak

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post #24 of 32 Old 10-09-2019, 09:54 AM Thread Starter
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In the closeup picture showing jointing the board on the router table, the wood looks like red oak to me.

There are many species of oak and different parts of the country might call slightly different varieties of oak “white oak”. I don’t know for sure because I’m not in forestry. The white oak that I buy in Michigan is a beautiful brown color. Hard to tell from photos, but I wouldn’t call any of those boards white oak.

Here's the endgrain of both one of the lighter and darker hues together.
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post #25 of 32 Old 10-09-2019, 10:11 AM Thread Starter
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I don't have success to report today. My glue-ups didn't get much better the second time around, where I wanted to completely eliminate the seam between the two boards. Luckily I've "hid" it by making sure the top face is clamped together well as I can.

Here's some of the learning points I've come across, please feel free to offer corrections as you see fit.
-When thinking about the dimensions for the board, you should leave yourself extra for finishing POST glue up. Glue is messy. More on this later, cringe pictures to follow. Also, somehow post-clamp the end to end dimensions shifted slightly. So now I'll have to shave a bit off each end to ensure lengths are consistent to keep bedframe square.

- Harbor freight aluminum F clamps aren't really worth much when you're trying to get a really tight tolerances on a glue up. I bought 2x 50" clamps to glue up a piece of wood 1.5" thick. After the first glue up, I noticed in tightening the jaws the bottom stop just starting stretching the aluminum cut out. So then you pay for it with a gap in your glued wood.

- I bought way too many types of clamps for this thing. Mentality: well for next time I'll have an assortment to choose from. Correction: pipe or C-clamps would have worked just fine if not better. And I could have had (what I believe to be) the correct amount needed for this glue up for the same price I paid for the stupid aluminum ones. Classic "bigger/longer must be better" machismo. Blah. Only took me watching 30 minutes of youtube on clamp types to understand this. Could have saved me some bucks.


So. Idea is to return the aluminum ones to HF. The product sticker did say lifetime warranty before I ripped it off...
Purchase 2x pipe and 4x C clamps. These should give me the clamp force I need to really marry up the seams.

Minor victory: the laminated boards are pretty straight. No bow or twist to note.

What else am I missing?

Thanks for keeping me straight.
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post #26 of 32 Old 10-09-2019, 12:22 PM
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I went looking for an unfinished project with white oak. This is what I found first.

The brown wood is white oak, the light colored wood is maple.
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post #27 of 32 Old 10-09-2019, 12:25 PM
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Both of those boards are definitely RED oak.

As far as clamps go, Harbor Freight clamps are very cheaply made, like all of their other stuff. However, as you gain woodworking experience, you will learn exactly how much clamping pressure you can put on HF clamps before they break. Also note that you dont have to really force the clamps that tight. If you really have to use a lot of strength, you are over tightening. How much is not enough and how much is too much? This is something that cant be explained in words.

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post #28 of 32 Old 10-09-2019, 01:06 PM Thread Starter
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Both of those boards are definitely RED oak.

As far as clamps go, Harbor Freight clamps are very cheaply made, like all of their other stuff. However, as you gain woodworking experience, you will learn exactly how much clamping pressure you can put on HF clamps before they break. Also note that you dont have to really force the clamps that tight. If you really have to use a lot of strength, you are over tightening. How much is not enough and how much is too much? This is something that cant be explained in words.
Well I don't think I'm clamping all too hard, I just want to use enough force to have a small amount of squeeze out and marry up the edges. Last two glue ups I was still left with a few sections where there were gaps. Just changed out the aluminum clamps for pipe and c clamps, hoping they will help me achieve that is the end result

As to wood types, I guess we will have a bit of contrast between the legs (made out of white.oak) and the beams that I guess are red oak. Appreciate the help with the detective work.

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post #29 of 32 Old 10-09-2019, 01:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Tony B View Post
Both of those boards are definitely RED oak.

As far as clamps go, Harbor Freight clamps are very cheaply made, like all of their other stuff. However, as you gain woodworking experience, you will learn exactly how much clamping pressure you can put on HF clamps before they break. Also note that you dont have to really force the clamps that tight. If you really have to use a lot of strength, you are over tightening. How much is not enough and how much is too much? This is something that cant be explained in words.

I have used several Harbor Freight clamps. There is no breaking problem is you use the proper amount of clamping pressure. If the clamp breaks it generally means that you are over tightening the clamps.


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post #30 of 32 Old 10-09-2019, 01:42 PM
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Originally Posted by ftnuna3819 View Post
Well I don't think I'm clamping all too hard, I just want to use enough force to have a small amount of squeeze out and marry up the edges. Last two glue ups I was still left with a few sections where there were gaps. Just changed out the aluminum clamps for pipe and c clamps, hoping they will help me achieve that is the end result

As to wood types, I guess we will have a bit of contrast between the legs (made out of white.oak) and the beams that I guess are red oak. Appreciate the help with the detective work.

From what I am reading, you are clamping too hard. Your problem should not be solved be over clamping. It should be solved by making the joint a better fit. With a proper joint fit moderate clamping pressure is best.


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post #31 of 32 Old 10-09-2019, 04:18 PM Thread Starter
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From what I am reading, you are clamping too hard. Your problem should not be solved be over clamping. It should be solved by making the joint a better fit. With a proper joint fit moderate clamping pressure is best.

Lightbulb illuminated. That checks. Definitely good learning point about the lamination process. I thought I had already finished all four sides for both boards and lost a lot of material in the process, when really I should have just finished the two sides that were going to be glued together, done the glue-up, then finished the remaining sides to ensure square and dimensions. Wish I had a legit jointer.

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post #32 of 32 Old 10-09-2019, 04:30 PM
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Originally Posted by ftnuna3819 View Post
.................. Last two glue ups I was still left with a few sections where there were gaps. Just changed out the aluminum clamps for pipe and c clamps, hoping they will help me achieve that is the end result
As to wood types, I guess we will have a bit of contrast between the legs (made out of white.oak) and the beams that I guess are red oak. Appreciate the help with the detective work.
Clamps should never be used to close gaps unless very little pressure is needed to close them up. The boards should fit perfectly before glue-up. You should be able to get a perfectly straight edge right off of the table saw. I have always owned jointers but rarely ever used them. I am able to rip the 2 boards and they will fit perfectly. If not, there is a problem with the table saw adjustments.

As for the different colors, I always like and use contrasting wood in my designs. That allows me to make simple designs and the contrasting colors remove the boredom.

BTW, dont take me and George C's comments as criticism. We know this is new to you and are trying to help the best we can. I'm just happy to see a relatively new guy actually building something. We tend to be our own worse critics. Keep challenging yourself and you learn to be impressed with your own work. And by the way, dont point out any defects to other people that otherwise would never have seen them.

Enjoy
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