Paul Sellers Console Table - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 14 Old 08-26-2019, 02:27 PM Thread Starter
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Paul Sellers Console Table

Decided to finally try a piece of furniture. I subscribe to the Paul Sellers Masterclass (paid instructional videos not published on YouTube). Paul recently bought a house with the sole purpose of having a blank slate to fill up with handmade furniture. This console table is the first project in the series. I like this table because it can be resized for any space, and the design is simple enough that it would be at home in just about any decor. With a few modifications, it can be mid-century modern or more traditional.

This is a build in progress. The project calls for 3/4" stock. I chose white oak.

Pic #1:
First up are the legs, a two-piece tapered design. There is a visible seam between the two pieces, and rather than try to hide it, the design calls attention to it by creating a decorative groove that is duplicated on the other side.

Pic #2:
A closer view of the legs. The leg in the foreground has been finished, while the background leg just came out of glue-up. The "artificial seam" is created by running a tenon saw the length of the leg, creating a groove. I then used a beading tool to add a chamfer to the edges of the groove, creating a shadow line for visual interest. Finally, the 90 corner where the two components meet are rounded over.

Pics #3 and 4:
A look at the offset mortises. A mortise is just a hole, right? Nothing to write home to mom about. The layout here was a bit tricky - just had to make sure the orientation was correct for each leg. This is 3/4" stock and a 1/4" mortise. Not sure if there's a special name for the notch at the top - there probably is.

Pic #5:
Here's the bottom of a finished leg. Here you can see the two grooves and rounded edge. The endgrain was chamfered using a file.
Next up are the aprons. I have 3 of them cut to size already, but the front apron is special. A drawer will be cut into the front apron so the grain is continuous across the front for a seamless appearance. Then, tenons cut into the aprons to join the legs and form the carcass of the console table. Stay tuned!

Thoughts, advice, comments are always appreciated!
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post #2 of 14 Old 08-27-2019, 07:41 AM
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Congrats on your first piece. It lookin good.
When you get through this, you will be designing your own. The principal in designing furniture is pretty mush the same.
Same goes for entertainment Centers which are basically cabinets with less doors.
Maybe on your next post you can telll us a little bit about the joinery without revealing the final product till it done.
How long you been woodworking?

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post #3 of 14 Old 08-27-2019, 02:05 PM Thread Starter
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How long you been woodworking?
Hmm...I finished my first real project and started accumulating tools about a year ago. I had some DIY projects under my belt, but nothing "serious." This is a retirement plan for me. I'm hoping to build up enough skills to one day supplement my income with building furniture after I leave the workforce.

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post #4 of 14 Old 08-27-2019, 02:15 PM
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Good luck to you Anthony and I hope you get to achieve your goals.
I have several careers and some of them while actually owning and operating a woodworking business at the same time. It kept me busy. I have not lived in a brick and mortar structure in 30 years. in order to keep my hobby/business while also maintaining a career, I had to rent/lease buildings. for the past 30 years I have been living on my boat all but 2 years which is now living in my RV. I have now been retired 7 years and am seriously thinking of starting another woodworking business. Thats a long story and I dont think it will happen though. Anyway,congrats again and best wished to you.
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post #5 of 14 Old 08-31-2019, 02:40 PM Thread Starter
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Time for the front apron. The design calls for continuous grain across the front...which is tricky since there is a drawer.

Pic #1:
The front apron gets a 2" drawer in the middle. I selected a piece of wood that had a nice grain pattern, but wasn't wild or directional. We're essentially ripping this into 3 sections and gluing it back together and making the cuts disappear. I ripped a 1" piece on my table saw, followed by the 2" drawer, then another 1" piece. I used a table saw because my hand sawing skills are not good enough to keep tight tolerances like this. Here you can see the layout lines for the center and edges of the drawer.

Pic #2:
After hand planing all of the sawn edges and several test fits to close the gaps, the drawer is laid out and cut in. After that, this is glued up and cinched tight in clamps, leaving the drawer front unglued so that it can be removed and fitted later.

Once the glue cures, I'll run screws through the top and bottom for added strength. Then the face surfaces will be hand planed smooth, which should remove any remaining visible seams and this will look like a single piece of wood again.
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post #6 of 14 Old 08-31-2019, 04:23 PM
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Anthony

Running screws through the top and bottom are totally unnecessary. You just have to have faith in the glue. it will do its job.
spotsSame goes for table top glue-ups. They dont need biscuits, dowels or anything else but glue. If anything, screws and the like might even cause weak areas. Keep in mind that modern glues are stronger than the wood they are holding together.

Anyway, nice going. Now I cant wait to see the finished product

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post #7 of 14 Old 08-31-2019, 04:30 PM
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Here is another tip:
Always keep chalk handy. One white and one any other colr like pink or blue. When youy parts are laid out, you make an inverted "V" with the point of the "V" upward. Then you will always know which end is up and which sides are the fronts. Because of the cut-out for the drawer, make 3 'V"'s or one really wide one so you wont get the left and right pieces mixed up. Chalk is just dust, the air compressor jet nozzle will blow it right off.
Hope that helps.
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post #8 of 14 Old 08-31-2019, 05:44 PM Thread Starter
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Front apron is done! Well...mostly. I still need to add tenons to the ends. You can barely make out the vertical seams of the drawer front here, but that's okay because the gap will actually be widened when I build the drawer later anyway.
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post #9 of 14 Old 08-31-2019, 07:21 PM
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Looks great so far.

Red oak is one of my favorite woods to work. Something about it makes the seams disappear.
If only it didn't smell so bad when I cut it.

Anyway, great job and I'm sure you will be so proud of yourself when you complete it. I believe this is your first piece of real furniture.
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post #10 of 14 Old 08-31-2019, 10:58 PM
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I gotta admit that I always look forward to @AmishElectricCo's posts. He has come so far in a short time. Kudos to him!
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post #11 of 14 Old 09-01-2019, 09:54 AM
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If you dont push yourself, you will never learn and never be good at anything. In the distant past, I have seen many woodworkers on here accumulate wood and "wait til they are ready". Some probably still aren't ready. I am of the thinking that you will learn a lot more by building one not so perfect piece a month than if you worked on the same piece, making it perfect for 6 months.

Also note that most imperfections in our work are only noticed by us. if you keep correcting the same piece, it will never be done. There comes a point at which you just have to say "it's done" - ready or not.
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post #12 of 14 Old 09-01-2019, 11:44 AM Thread Starter
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I gotta admit that I always look forward to @AmishElectricCo's posts. He has come so far in a short time. Kudos to him!
Thank you!

Today I started joining the aprons to the legs. This calls for tenons with haunches, which is a first for me. Below is a pic of my first attempt. It's not horrible, but there's definitely room for improvement. Need to close up those gaps. The table top will cover this, so no one will ever see it, but like @Tony B said...I know it's there.

I framed and hung one of Paul's quotes in my shop: "How we work determines the outcome." If I settle for close enough on the little things, then the final project will turn out that way too.
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post #13 of 14 Old 09-01-2019, 12:04 PM
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Thank you!
............... Need to close up those gaps. The table top will cover this, so no one will ever see it, but like @Tony B said...I know it's there.

I framed and hung one of Paul's quotes in my shop: "How we work determines the outcome." If I settle for close enough on the little things, then the final project will turn out that way too.
Knowing it is there will kill you. So in this case, if the joint is loose, it must be repaired. Glue is not a 'gap filler' and so, it's only strength is in adhering 2 pieces together, so glue alone won't work. This leaves you several choices: One is to use epoxy on the joint. Another is to look in scrap pile or make a really thin slice of wood on the table saw, that can be glued to the tenon. When dry, test fit it and see if more needs to be added or some sanded away. Simple repair. I steer clear of the word 'fix' if I can. I like 'repaired' better. Knowing what went wrong with this joint will tell you how to avoid it in the future.

Here is another quote for you..."Strive for excellence and settle for completion". (This quote is meant as guideline and not necessarily literally). The more you build and the more you challenge yourself, each succeeding project will get closer to 'excellence'.
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post #14 of 14 Old Yesterday, 10:43 PM Thread Starter
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I'll just be honest, I haven't spent a lot of time in the shop lately because of the heat wave. 95+ in September? No thanks! Finally got some rain to cool things down a bit, so I was able to get my tenons finished and get the table up on its legs.

You can see my assembly triangle in the front apron along with the continuous grain drawer front that's still wedged in there. I'm happy with progress so far. I need to clean up the edge of a few tenons to close the gap, otherwise, so far so good.

A bit more joinery in the next step. A pair of drawer supports run across the width of the table. Nothing fancy, just a couple of dados. Then it's on to the drawer and top. Stay tuned for the drawer - it will be my first attempt at dovetails.
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