Kitchen hood in the making - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 32 Old 09-20-2020, 06:55 PM Thread Starter
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Kitchen hood in the making

I started this yesterday. I had some left over tin tiles from a ceiling project and thought it would look pretty sharp.

The pictures were taken after the initial fit up, nothing was glued yet, neither was the sanding complete.

Currently its in pieces to paint the frame members. I will post when its done, but so far Im pretty happy with it. But if I had more tiles, which I donít, I would remake the angled side inserts to have the grid lines match the front. It was an oversight.





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post #2 of 32 Old 09-20-2020, 06:59 PM
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recommend you caulk/silicone the inside groove of the dado so the accumulating grease does not spread thru to the front.....
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post #3 of 32 Old 09-20-2020, 07:23 PM Thread Starter
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The gooves will be caulked, but beyond that, the entire inside will be lined with Pittsburgh seamed sheetmetal.


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post #4 of 32 Old 09-20-2020, 07:39 PM
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looking great !!
hope to see more of the project like the fans, exhaust hoses, etc.
I always wondered what the insides of the wooden hoods were.
never thought they would have a metal insert - brilliant.
is that a code requirement ?? (the metal inside).

.
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post #5 of 32 Old 09-20-2020, 08:03 PM Thread Starter
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I dont think its a residential code requirement. It is for commercial kitchens. And pending what type of cooking its for, may require welded seems.

Most residential wooden range hoods are just for show, and have a fan insert that connects to ductwork.

Mines a little different, totally custom. My fan will be in the attic, and ducted to the hood.

I wanted more exhaust capacity, so Im doing it this way.


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post #6 of 32 Old 09-20-2020, 08:07 PM
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that was my idea too - have the appropriate size fan way up in the attic
to reduce the noise at the stove level. I hate that Jet Blast sound !!!

.

there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks.
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post #7 of 32 Old 09-20-2020, 08:18 PM Thread Starter
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I never minded the noise so much, I just dont like all the smoke that inevitably escapes when doing any time of stovetop cooking.

Combo microwave hoods are the worst for that.

Even a dedicated standard range hood maxes out around 200 cfm with ideal ducting.

After ducting, lucky to get 100 cfm.

I want more like 350 to 400 cfm. So I got a 6Ē inline fan made by Tjerland.

Iíll be working on the internals this week, so I will post some more progress pictures.


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post #8 of 32 Old 09-20-2020, 10:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by furnacefighter15 View Post

Currently its in pieces to paint the frame members. I will post when its done, but so far Im pretty happy with it. But if I had more tiles, which I donít, I would remake the angled side inserts to have the grid lines match the front. It was an oversight.





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Geometry is against you there, unless you run the side panels' grid lines perpendicular to the slope of the front panel, running 20ļ downward toward the back. If they run horizontally, then only one of the side panel grid lines can match up with those of the sloping front panel.

Nice looking hood, though. Good job.
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post #9 of 32 Old 09-20-2020, 10:28 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brucet999 View Post
Geometry is against you there, unless you run the side panels' grid lines perpendicular to the slope of the front panel, running 20ļ downward toward the back. If they run horizontally, then only one of the side panel grid lines can match up with those of the sloping front panel.

Nice looking hood, though. Good job.

Thanks.

It took me a minute to understand what you were saying about the geometry being against me. But I get it now. Same reason the lines dont mate up now is why they wont mate if re-attempt. IE, bottom grid might, but the next one up would not.

Im glad you pointed that out. I was about to order more tiles to see if I could make it work.


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post #10 of 32 Old 09-21-2020, 09:15 AM
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Bruce is correct ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by brucet999 View Post
Geometry is against you there, unless you run the side panels' grid lines perpendicular to the slope of the front panel, running 20ļ downward toward the back. If they run horizontally, then only one of the side panel grid lines can match up with those of the sloping front panel.

Nice looking hood, though. Good job.

If it were me, I'd remove the sheet metal panels from the frame and orient them as best I could so the grids align.... just temporarily. Use painters tape to see what needs to be trimmed and how much.
You'll end up trimming some off the tops and some off the bottoms of them to get them close, but because of the front slope, they will never be just "perfect".
For instance, if you take a 6" long stick place in on a flat surface and start to tip it back, the vertical height will be less than 6" and the more you tip it the less it will be..... geometry!
If you are willing to rotate them 45 degrees it won't matter at all since there is no horizontal reference to line up.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 09-21-2020 at 09:18 AM.
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post #11 of 32 Old 09-21-2020, 01:48 PM
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make up air

Your hood is looking good. something to consider is where the air being exhausted will come from. 400 cfm exhaust is the limit before codes have you add make up air. your house is giving up conditioned air to the exhaust and leaking in unconditioned air that you will pay to condition.

my day job is a mechanical inspector.
Make up air makes homeowners mad and kitchen sales folks don't often mention it.

keep up the good work.
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post #12 of 32 Old 09-21-2020, 04:18 PM
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my experience is perhaps more "extended is required"


essentially - if the stove/cooktop is x" wide, most kitchen designers / home builders do an x" wide hood.

venting, non-venting, no matter.

30" "hole" for stove/oven, 30" wide hood.

does not do what one would wish it to do.



however what actually does matter is that the hood extends beyond the width and depth of the stove/cooktop - by at least 12 inches.
the fumes/vapors/oil mist escape an "exact width" hood - you get a non-solution to the problem.
get a gander at the sizing of commercial hoods - they work; the home center "kitchen designer" has those credentials only because they've mastered the CAD software, not be cause they know what they are doing.



fwiw, noting that for your own home, one needs absolute control over the kitchen design/build.....
and that gets real tricky.
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post #13 of 32 Old 09-21-2020, 07:25 PM
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That's why I love this place ....

Quote:
Originally Posted by sawdust&shellac View Post
Your hood is looking good. something to consider is where the air being exhausted will come from. 400 cfm exhaust is the limit before codes have you add make up air. your house is giving up conditioned air to the exhaust and leaking in unconditioned air that you will pay to condition.

my day job is a mechanical inspector.
Make up air makes homeowners mad and kitchen sales folks don't often mention it.

keep up the good work.
Guy comes in off the street/web and make a point we probably wouldn't have considered! ... make up air for a stove vent. We always talk about allowing more incoming air for a outside vented dust collector, but we probably would not have thought about it for a range hood .... I donno?


Quote:
Originally Posted by TomCT2 View Post
my experience is perhaps more "extended is required" .... essentially - if the stove/cooktop is x" wide, most kitchen designers / home builders do an x" wide hood.

venting, non-venting, no matter.

30" "hole" for stove/oven, 30" wide hood.

does not do what one would wish it to do.


however what actually does matter is that the hood extends beyond the width and depth of the stove/cooktop - by at least 12 inches.
the fumes/vapors/oil mist escape an "exact width" hood - you get a non-solution to the problem.
get a gander at the sizing of commercial hoods - they work; the home center "kitchen designer" has those credentials only because they've mastered the CAD software, not be cause they know what they are doing.

fwiw, noting that for your own home, one needs absolute control over the kitchen design/build.....
and that gets real tricky.

In my case the range hood and the range were a "matched pair" and the same width, 48" . Not one to trust a single method or system, I installed a pair of bath room vents at the very top of the ceiling just 5 ft above the range hood to exhaust whatever smells didn't get picked up by the "undersize" range hood. It works fairly well, but kitchen/cooking smells are tough to get rid of...... steaming broccoli for instance..... frying bacon...... sauteing onions....

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 09-21-2020 at 07:45 PM.
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post #14 of 32 Old 09-21-2020, 07:50 PM
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Keep up the great work Ö Good effort!
why are range hood or vents in kitchen not made to vent outdoors 🏚🔥💨?
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post #15 of 32 Old 09-21-2020, 09:11 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sawdust&shellac View Post
Your hood is looking good. something to consider is where the air being exhausted will come from. 400 cfm exhaust is the limit before codes have you add make up air. your house is giving up conditioned air to the exhaust and leaking in unconditioned air that you will pay to condition.

my day job is a mechanical inspector.
Make up air makes homeowners mad and kitchen sales folks don't often mention it.

keep up the good work.

Thanks.

Im a Pipe Fitter by day. I have lots of plans in the works for the mechanicals of the house. One of them is space pressure controlled fresh air.


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post #16 of 32 Old 09-21-2020, 09:24 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomCT2 View Post
my experience is perhaps more "extended is required"


essentially - if the stove/cooktop is x" wide, most kitchen designers / home builders do an x" wide hood.

venting, non-venting, no matter.

30" "hole" for stove/oven, 30" wide hood.

does not do what one would wish it to do.



however what actually does matter is that the hood extends beyond the width and depth of the stove/cooktop - by at least 12 inches.
the fumes/vapors/oil mist escape an "exact width" hood - you get a non-solution to the problem.
get a gander at the sizing of commercial hoods - they work; the home center "kitchen designer" has those credentials only because they've mastered the CAD software, not be cause they know what they are doing.



fwiw, noting that for your own home, one needs absolute control over the kitchen design/build.....
and that gets real tricky.

Your right that capture area is critical. My kitchen space is fairly minimal, so comprises were made. It is same width as the stove, and as deep as I could reasonably make it without being obnoxious for the size of the kitchen. It is deeper then a standard hood, but not as deep as Id really like it to be.

Time will be the test of the effectiveness of the design. But Im confident in my skillset with mechanical design.


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post #17 of 32 Old 09-22-2020, 08:35 AM
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as of 2018 kitchens are required to vent to the outdoor. some builders use a ceiling exhaust fan rather than the hood in the interest of construction time.
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post #18 of 32 Old 09-22-2020, 08:35 AM
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Keep up the great work Ö Good effort!
why are range hood or vents in kitchen not made to vent outdoors
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post #19 of 32 Old 09-22-2020, 10:35 AM
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I've only ever seen one that did not vent outdoors, and that was in a 1929 Manhattan apartment where ducting to outdoors is impossible.

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post #20 of 32 Old 09-22-2020, 07:09 PM
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I have a curved glass hood apron on my exhaust - quite fancy for me. I though that I would get better capture of fumes by ordering the 36" model for my 30" cooktop. (i.e., hood is 6" wider than cooktop).

Wrong!

All I got was bumping my head on a semiregular basis as the curved makes the wider glass lower at its edges.

Retired engineer-bureaucrat in Oakland, CA. Been working with wood since the 1960's. From the 50's if you count the scrap woodpile on the farm!
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