Alternative Methods Challenge - Slant sided Jewelry Box - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 67 Old 09-22-2011, 02:57 AM Thread Starter
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Alternative Methods Challenge - Slant sided Jewelry Box

Welp, Here goes nothing...

For this challenge, I selected the slant sided jewelry box.

Having only a photo to go by,


I have spent a couple of days figuring out my own set of plans before cutting anything.


I'm not a Professional Wood Worker by any means, just another guy who enjoys making things with my hands and seeing the looks on the faces of family and friends when I give the things I've made as gifts. So you will see some mistakes and goof-ups along the way. Remember, its not the mistakes that matter, its how you deal with them that counts.

The box is built using contrasting woods. The light and dark colors add a nice detail to the project. Not being able to afford the more expensive woods, I used what I had on hand for this project. I'll be working with S4S Poplar and Red Oak for this build. Both of these are available at either Home Depot or Lowes and will not cost an arm and a leg. We'll see if these less expensive woods look as nice when assembled as some other selections that can cost over $100.00 and still need to be planed down to size. So far the total cost of lumber is $10.00 for a 3/4 x 6 x 48 length of Poplar and $0.00 for the Red Oak as this was given to me by my Brother in Law last year.

First lets talk about the tools needed for the build. I decided to use the fewest tools I could to show what could be done with only limited tools working in a confined workspace. We'll be working on half of a screened in car port, in a back yard 10'x10' shed, and out on a 8'x 8' deck.

First we'll need some things to layout and machine our work pieces.


A pencil, Tape Measure (a small 12 footer will do) A square, and an adjustable square handle the layout work.

A 10" Compound Miter saw, Contractor's Table Saw, Router, and Router table with both a 1/2" and 3/4" straight bits, Awl (or ice pick) drill motor, small drill bit, hand saw (I'll be using both a Dove Tail saw and a cross cut saw), screw driver, 3/4" chisel and finally a sander (either electric or hand operated) will take care of all the machining to complete the project.

We'll also need some wide tape for use during assembly, a good wood glue, and maybe a little waxed paper to prevent glue from dripping onto the work bench.

Before getting into the actual cutting, please refer to your owner's manual for directions on adjusting the saw blade on any power saws you plan to use. Accurate cuts are required for the proper fit of the pieces. So take extra time to insure all your tools are set properly and working freely.

If Woodworking is so much fun why isn't it called WoodFUNNING?

I've made a few videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/johnnie52
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post #2 of 67 Old 09-22-2011, 03:33 AM Thread Starter
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Now, let's start to make some cuts.

But first, let me try my best to imitate our old friend Norm.

A word about shop safety. Be sure to read, understand and follow the safety instructions that came with your power tools, and always wear eye protection (and ear protection) when working with any of the tools in your shop.

My plans call for the finished box to be 11"x7"x4 3/8" tall. That comes to just over 36" total material needed to make the 4 sides. Adding for the saw kerf between pieces, I cut 37" from my 48" piece of Poplar. Always remember, you will loose some wood as the saw passes through the wood, so never lay out your pieces butting against each other. Leave room for the blade!

I'm somewhat lazy when it comes to measuring and just a little blind, so I usually cut my first piece and then use it to mark any others of the same length.








With the work pieces cut to length, its time to layout the miters. Rather than reposition the saw for each 45 degree cut, I often mark the cut on opposite sides of my work piece and then simply "flip" the piece in the saw to make the miters.



It helps if you mark the Long and Short sides so as not to make your miters in opposite directions on the wrong sides of the work pieces. I also like to extend the lines onto the short face from each miter line. This way I can quickly see that I have things laid out correctly and it also acts as a safety for making the cuts. If I can see the extension lines, the piece is in the saw backwards. You can see in the above photo how I mark the pieces with an "S" and an "L" for the Short and Long sides, and the extended cut lines on the short face.

Taking the marked pieces to the miter saw, carefully align your saw to the 45 degree mark. You should double check that the saw is indeed set to make a 45 degree cut. I use a drafting triangle to make this check, but you can just as well use the angled side of a combination square. Align your square's 90 degree side with the saw's fence and the 45 degree side with the blade. With everything aligned you're ready to cut.



Set your work piece on the saw table and align your cut mark with the blade. Now, clamp the piece to the saw's fence.


This is for two reasons. First, it will hold the work piece in place as you lower the blade into it, ensuring that it does not move and ruin the cut. It also allows you to keep your hand away from the blade! A metal clamp holds the work, not a flesh and blood hand! We want to keep all the parts we were born with in the same place as they started .. right?

Once all the miters are cut, its time to move to the Router table.

This first pass will be to cut the rabbit in the bottom of each piece for the bottom of the box. I plan to use 1/4 Baltic Birch plywood for the bottom. So I set my 1/2 straight bit in my router at the table to make a 3/8" wide x 5/16" deep cut and passed each piece through.





Look closely and you'll see the first of those mistakes I mentioned in the first post. I'm a little shaky on my feet these days and as I was passing the end pieces through the router I lost my balance. This caused me to relax my hold and the router to cut too deeply into the pieces.

Oh well... I'll fix it... you'll see....

This is as far as I got today. The Florida sky turned dark, and the wind picked up. A sure sign around here that a heavy rain storm is only minutes away. Besides it was time to put the toys away and go eat. So there will be more tomorrow hopefully provided the weather lets me do anything.

If Woodworking is so much fun why isn't it called WoodFUNNING?

I've made a few videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/johnnie52

Last edited by johnnie52; 09-22-2011 at 01:07 PM.
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post #3 of 67 Old 09-22-2011, 08:15 AM
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Looking great so far. There's a ton of detail in your descriptions which will most certainly help out the newer wood workers. Very nice job. I'll be watching this one for sure.

There is a very fine line between a "hobby" and a "mental illness"
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post #4 of 67 Old 09-22-2011, 03:16 PM
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Great write up so far Johnnie. I'll see if I can get you the official plans emailed out tonight. I've unfortunately been putting in 15 hour days this week, which has left only time to eat and get some sleep before returning to work.
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post #5 of 67 Old 09-22-2011, 03:35 PM
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Go Jonnie GO!

Looks great! Thanks for putting the time into documenting this. Can't wait to see how it comes together.
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post #6 of 67 Old 09-22-2011, 10:38 PM
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Looks good so far. I'm looking forward to seeing how these all turn out.
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post #7 of 67 Old 09-22-2011, 10:49 PM
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Nice job so far and I'm looking forward to seeing this come together!

Ut Prosim
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post #8 of 67 Old 09-23-2011, 03:19 AM Thread Starter
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Did not get much time today to work on the box. I was busy with appointments and meetings.

About all I managed to get done was to verify that everything was going as it should up to this point.

Taking my work pieces in hand, I set them into position and secured them with a ratcheting clamp. Then I checked the corners to ensure proper fit and measured from each corner on a diagonal as shown below. The parts are being "dry fit". No glue at this time!





We are looking at the bottom of the box here. The top looked just as nice. (many thinks to my wife who held the tape as I took pictures)

By the time I finished this test , the weather had turned.



Shortly after this was taken, the sky opened up and neighborhood was treated to a downpour!

So unfortunately the shop stayed under wraps...





With luck, tomorrow will be a better day and we can get back to work on our box!

If Woodworking is so much fun why isn't it called WoodFUNNING?

I've made a few videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/johnnie52

Last edited by johnnie52; 09-23-2011 at 03:51 AM.
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post #9 of 67 Old 09-23-2011, 05:57 AM
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Darn that weather!!!

It has no right to slow down this build, and keep us waiting.

You're doing great, there, Johnnie
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post #10 of 67 Old 09-23-2011, 08:13 AM
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Loving this build. Being that this is the alternative methods challenge, it is nice to see that you have already done a couple of things that I would have chosent to do differently. Both correct, but different. This challenge is awesome. Keep up the great work and I'm looking forward to the next post.

There is a very fine line between a "hobby" and a "mental illness"
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post #11 of 67 Old 09-23-2011, 09:35 AM Thread Starter
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You have no idea how funny it was to read your post Kenbo....

I do it on purpose! I first read your post, see how you have done something, then do it differently! I usually do much the same as you when building things....

Yippee! Sun is shining so its off the the races!

If Woodworking is so much fun why isn't it called WoodFUNNING?

I've made a few videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/johnnie52

Last edited by johnnie52; 09-23-2011 at 09:38 AM.
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post #12 of 67 Old 09-23-2011, 10:01 AM
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your build is fantastic...I 'm so impressed with documentation I 'm thinking about starting over.........thanks for the steer to the right forum listing

lawrence

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post #13 of 67 Old 09-23-2011, 11:17 AM
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I keep on learning from the "pros" here. This is a great idea and allows some of us a grand opportunity to learn different techniques and acquire new approaches to building.

Thanks to all who are posting, some of us really are learning from you guys.

Never Stop Learning - You Stop Living.
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post #14 of 67 Old 09-24-2011, 01:22 AM Thread Starter
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Are we ready?

The sun is shining, so its time to get busy. Our first step this morning is dealing with the presents left by Mother Nature yesterday. Copious quantities of left over water always finds its way into every possible pocket in the covers on my machines.




First step in today's build is to carefully dump the water, dry the tarp, and get everything set up to work.

I'm sure that somewhere, someone, has the perfect router bit to make a sloped sided box at a price far beyond my ability to even dream of owning. Therefore, when the time comes, I'll be cutting the slopping sides at the table saw. Today I discovered that my saw will not make a cut deep enough to slope a 4 inch side. So its back to the drawing board and some quick math. We need to lower the sides by an inch, and even at that there may be some cutting by hand to get the full effect.

I set my fence to remove 1/2" and proceeded to rip away a little from both the top and bottom of each side piece.


Notice how thin the cut off of the already rabbited bottom edge is. This cut could never have been made using the stock Craftsman fence that was issued with my saw. However, the Delta T2 fence system makes this kind of cut as simple and safe as any other cut made on a table saw. If you own an older Craftsman and are looking to improve its performance, putting a T2 fence on it is the best money you will ever spend.

After nearly destroying the project when I lost my balance on the first day, I decided to adapt my technique at the router table to match my now limited abilities at standing up-right and holding onto stuff. This build is as much of a learning experience for me as it is for others...

I made an aux fence from 1/4 hard board and clamped it to the router table fence. Now instead of a wide opening at the bit, the space is a mere 1 inch wide. I also swapped over to a 3/4" straight bit instead of the 1/2" bit that I used the first time. This new arrangement makes it possible to lay the work pieces flat on the table rather than running them on their edge creating a much more stable arrangement that even I feel safer working with.


So, once again, we measure and mark the location of our rabbit, and using the marks as a guide, we adjust the bit to about half of the needed cut. Connect the shop vac to the dust collection port on the fence and prepare to route our pieces.


Run each piece through once, then reset the bit to finish the cut and run each piece through a second time to get our final rabbit.


Repeat the process for the opposite edge, adjusting the depth of cut for the difference in the top and bottom rabbits, and the finished piece is sheer perfection...


(See, I told you I'd fix that mistake from the first day)

Please note, the ear protectors are not holding the aux. fence, they are being shown to remind everyone to always wear ear and eye protection when using machines. I'd show you the safety glasses, but then I could not see to take the pictures...

Everyone has heard the rule, make multiple passes at the router table. Has anyone ever showed you why?

Here is a piece of scrap set up to make a full rabbit cut in a single pass.


And here is what happened while attempting to make the cut..


Part of the way through, the work piece refused to move and a large piece chipped off, leaving the mangled mess you see above. I still haven't found the clip that flew off the work piece. Hopefully its inside the shop vac. If not I'll find it in the sweepings at clean up.

At this point I took a break, went inside to get out of the heat, poured myself a cup of coffee and relaxed.

If Woodworking is so much fun why isn't it called WoodFUNNING?

I've made a few videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/johnnie52

Last edited by johnnie52; 09-24-2011 at 01:25 AM.
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post #15 of 67 Old 09-24-2011, 01:47 AM
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Dude!

I gotta admire your attitude regarding the rain and having a "shop" under a carport or open patio. The puddles of water would drive me nuts. Seems like your shop vac would be sucking more water than dust. Makes me grateful for my crowded but dry shop even if it's up 15 stairs and I have to carry everything up.
Nice work on the project BTW, keep it up! bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #16 of 67 Old 09-24-2011, 02:09 AM
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Hello from a newbie!

This is a great walk through of your build. Impressive amount of time and effort invested, so thanks for that!

A few comments:

I hope this one isn't against the rules... You mentioned the cost of the materials... there are sellers on ebay that sell small thin stock of hardwoods for really good prices. For example a 18" x 4 1/2" x 3/8" piece of purple heart for a couple of dollars. I swear I am not one of the sellers! But I do buy from them a lot for box-making stock.

Second, I think a crosscut sled would allow you to cut those miters a lot easier on your table saw. I am a pretty new woodworker and when I made one it was like a huge jump in the quality of all my cuts. I have one for normal perpindicular cuts and another for bevels. Plans are all over the web. You can just about make one out of scrap.

Third...crud, I had a third but my wife came in and after talking to her I forgot it, darn!
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post #17 of 67 Old 09-24-2011, 02:26 AM Thread Starter
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Alright everybody, breaks over. GET BACK TO WORK!

Before going farther, its time to see if we've made a deep enough rabbit on the top edge so that the lid will extend over the top of the box and have enough room to round over the edges. Using a piece of scrap the same thickness as the proposed lid, we set it in the rabbit and stand the pieces upright.


Looking good!

The next step is to mill out the relieve on the front face to make it possible to open the lid.

Find the mid point of the front face, and then mark over an equal amount to each side of that mid point.



Place the work piece in the vise... oh wait, I don't have a vise!!!! Time for one of those "ALTERNATIVE METHODS".


Now using a 3/4" chisel, make a small cut at both outside marks.Do not use a hammer or mallet for this, just apply a firm pressure by hand.


The reason for this is to provide a "pre- kerf" (my personally made up term) to guide the saw as you start the cut. Now using a Dove tail saw (or any other hand saw you happen to have) make straight cuts down through the front face to the bottom of the rabbit.


Once you have made the straight cuts, make two more cuts, this time at an angle so that you end up with a small section being cut away.


The reason for this is to provide a clear space between the edge of the relief cut and the material to be routed so as not to allow the material to be "ripped" out as it is plunged into the spinning router bit.

Our first step is to prepare stop blocks on the router fence at the start and stop of the finger relief. We do this by first finding the edges of the bit and marking them on the fence.


Now we determine how wide to make the cut and clamp stop blocks at both places.


Now we carefully make our first pass on the front face of our work piece. Place the workpiece firmly on the table withe the face side up, brace it against the stop block at the right and "plunge it into the bit until it rests on the fence. Then move the piece through until it comes up against the stop block at the left of the bit.


The first pass removes most of the lip at the top of the piece . The second removes even more of the lip. Finally flip the piece onto its face, adjust the fence to make a deeper cut, and the third pass removes the remaining lip and begins to form the finger relief.


Now reset the fence to make a deeper cut, check to ensure the stops blocks are still in the proper location (adjust as needed) and make a forth pass in the same manner as the previous passes.

Make as many adjustments as needed to complete the feature. I made five adjustments before I arrived at my desired configuration of 1-1/2" wide x 1-1/4" down x 1/2" deep.



This looks far too deep right now, but remember we will be cutting a lot of material from the top of the piece when we make the slope.

And of course... once again... the ever present Florida rain put an end to production! Yes, those are puddles forming in my front yard and water running down the screening. SUNSHINE STATE MY LEFT FOOT!


If Woodworking is so much fun why isn't it called WoodFUNNING?

I've made a few videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/johnnie52

Last edited by johnnie52; 09-24-2011 at 03:21 AM.
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post #18 of 67 Old 09-24-2011, 03:19 AM Thread Starter
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Spilperson, Firstly, Welcome.

You are exactly the kind of wood worker these "Alternate Method" posts are being done for and your comments are most appreciated.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spilperson View Post
Hello from a newbie!

This is a great walk through of your build. Impressive amount of time and effort invested, so thanks for that!

A few comments:

I hope this one isn't against the rules... You mentioned the cost of the materials... there are sellers on ebay that sell small thin stock of hardwoods for really good prices. For example a 18" x 4 1/2" x 3/8" piece of purple heart for a couple of dollars. I swear I am not one of the sellers! But I do buy from them a lot for box-making stock.
I built this using only the stock I already had on hand. If I were going to buy stock There are a couple of lumber yards where I live that have good lumber at great prices. I'm always too impatient to wait for mail order lumber.

Quote:
Second, I think a crosscut sled would allow you to cut those miters a lot easier on your table saw. I am a pretty new woodworker and when I made one it was like a huge jump in the quality of all my cuts. I have one for normal perpindicular cuts and another for bevels. Plans are all over the web. You can just about make one out of scrap.
I have one myself. I chose not to use it here because I wanted to show the guys who may not have one that it could be done a "different way" and still come out nice. If you look through some of the other ALTERNATIVE METHODS threads being done by a few of us you'll notice that we are all using methods that may not be the normal way we would do it. The idea is to help those with lesser knowledge.

Quote:
Third...crud, I had a third but my wife came in and after talking to her I forgot it, darn!
I have that problem myself. Then again, I've had two strokes in the past seven years which makes me partly brain dead anyway.

If Woodworking is so much fun why isn't it called WoodFUNNING?

I've made a few videos
http://www.youtube.com/user/johnnie52

Last edited by johnnie52; 09-24-2011 at 03:25 AM.
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post #19 of 67 Old 09-24-2011, 06:55 PM
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Ah, I did not understand the premise, gotcha now, thanks, and thanks for the welcome.

Unfortunately, I only have one place around here (New Orleans area) that has a selection of hardwoods. They have an OK selection and prices, but they are only open M-F and not very late, so that is a pain. Other than that it is just whatever the big box stores decide to stock.

I have a bad habit of laying in bed at night surfing the web, and buying stuff. $20 here, $30 there...never much at any one time, but it adds up. I check ebay for stuff, and have built up a little stock of that kind of stuff. Some tooling from Shars from time to time, or various metal scraps. Its a bad habit!

Frank
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post #20 of 67 Old 09-25-2011, 12:38 AM
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Spilperson, we have several NO woodworkers that visit regularly. Keep reading and you'll find they're quite helpful and I think a couple are even amenable to meeting folks in real life and sharing knowledge first hand (along with a beer, perhaps). I believe you might even be surprised by the local stock available if you find those folks like RRBrown who are near(ish) to you.

The original Frank :) okay, just FrankP
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