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post #1 of 76 Old 09-19-2011, 06:19 PM Thread Starter
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Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box

On the weekend, I worked 30 hours of overtime and when I got into work this morning, the ministry of labour told me that I was not allowed to work today because I was over the limit for hours worked. Consdering that I didn't get any shop time at all this weekend because of the overtime, I went home and decided that today was a good day to start the challenge.
I've accepted the challenge of constructing all of the projects listed and I thought that I would start with the 3 tier box. So, without further adieu, I give you the start of my build.


For this particular project, the plans call for cherry for the frame. I don't have any cherry and I really like walnut, so I have chosen to construct the inbox out of walnut and maple. I pulled down a chunk of walnut and checked the plans.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9316.jpg


Parts A, B, and C are all 2" wide X 1/2" thick with the longest piece being 12". I decided to cut a 13" piece from the walnut to take care of the frame pieces.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9317.jpg


Over to the jointer, and as with all of my tools, before using them, I check to ensure that they are square and alligned. In this case, I verified that the fence is 90 degrees to my table.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9319.jpg


I then surface jointed the 13" board. As you can see in this photo, there is more to me than just a pair of hands.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9320.jpg


Then, I used my straight edge and checked that the wood was flat after jointing. Being happy with its flatness, I carried on.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9321.jpg

There is a very fine line between a "hobby" and a "mental illness"
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post #2 of 76 Old 09-19-2011, 06:30 PM Thread Starter
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From this point, I headed back to the jointer to edge joint the walnut board. The safety equipment that you see me using (push pads, ear muffs, safety glasses) are not there for photo purposes. I use them every time without exception and so should you.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9322.jpg

I then used my straight edge to check that the edge jointing that I just completed has given me a flat surface.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9323.jpg


Checking for flat surfaces is fine and dandy, but if those two surfaces are not 90 degrees to each other, then the act of running the board through the jointer is pointless. It is for that reason that I check to ensure that the jointed face and the jointed edge are 90 degrees from each other and perfectly perpendicular.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9324.jpg



At this point, I took my stock over to the surface planer and ran the walnut through for a few passes. You may want to note the separator in this photo. If you don't use one, you may want to consider it as it keeps a great deal of chips out of your collector.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9325.jpg


You can see in this photo, that I have planed the stock down to 2" thick. It is not by coincidence that this measurement is the same as the width of the frame pieces.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9326.jpg

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post #3 of 76 Old 09-19-2011, 06:41 PM Thread Starter
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Now to the table saw. I've installed my ripping blade and just as before, I check to ensure that the blade is square to the table.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9327.jpg



The blade is then set so that it is slight above the thickness of the stock.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9328.jpg


My fence is set to 1/2" and from there, I rip my 2" thick stock into 1/2" pieces.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9329.jpg


Here we can see that I have all of my 1/2" pieces stacked and ready to be marked according to the plans.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9331.jpg



In this photo, I am showing the amount of an off cut that I had. It measures slightly thicker than 1/4" and it is the only piece that is left over from from ripping the strips.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9332.jpg

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post #4 of 76 Old 09-19-2011, 06:51 PM Thread Starter
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The plans call for 4 A's, 2 B's and 2 C's. There are also some D's in there. So I use chaulk, and mark all of my pieces so that there is no confusion when I start to cut them to their nominal sizes. You can see that I have one extra board just in case there is an oops cut.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9333.jpg



Enter my fine crosscut blade and you guessed it, I check it for square against the table. In the spirit of alternative methods, I used my square this time instead of my fancy digital angle meter.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9335.jpg


I then installed my miter gauge on the saw and set up to do a test cut to check that it is cutting at a perfect 45 degree angle.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9336.jpg


Satified that my miter cut is a perfect 45, I carry on. When dealing with miters and such, it never hurts to check your cuts and double check. Verifying your miters will save a lot of frustration down the road.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9338.jpg



The pieces labled A are then cut. Pay attention when cutting these ones guys. I almost reversed a couple of the mitres.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9339.jpg

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post #5 of 76 Old 09-19-2011, 07:03 PM Thread Starter
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I carried on, cutting the pieces as per the drawing specifications, checking mitres and measurements all the way along. And here we can see the pieces for the frame, cut and ready for a dry fit.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9342.jpg



I clamped all the pieces together for a dry fitting to test the mitres and the tightness of the joints. I'm glad to say that all corner fit beautifully and I was very happy with their fit.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9343.jpg


It was now time for me to make a spline cutting jig. I have one that I use for my picture frames, but it wouldn't have worked for this project. So I installed my multipurpose junky blade and checked it for square. It may seem that I am really over emphasizing the checking for square, but it is a 2 second habit that can save you hours of frustration and headache.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9344.jpg


I ripped a 2" strip of scrap 3/4" MDF and mitred it and shown here. I also had another piece of scrap 3/4" MDF and cut it to a useable size. The size is really up to you, but you want to be sure to make it a size that is easily man handled.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9345.jpg




I then used my combination square to lay out the 2" wide piece to ensure that it is at a perfect 45 degree angle.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9346.jpg

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post #6 of 76 Old 09-19-2011, 07:07 PM
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Lookin' good there, Ken
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post #7 of 76 Old 09-19-2011, 07:16 PM
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Looking good so far. Great tutorial. Thanks for going to this extent.








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post #8 of 76 Old 09-19-2011, 07:24 PM Thread Starter
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Using my square as a guide, I screwed the 2" piece to the MDF back board. Be sure to take your time here and make it exactly 45 degrees. Having this guide off from 45 will cause serious headaches when trying to install the splines.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9347.jpg


Once the jig was constructed, and I had the fence set up to cut in the center of the 1/2" thick boards, I set the height of my ripping blade to 3/8", clamped my boards to the jig and one by one, cut my openings for the splines. Make sure that you use a clamp here to hold the stock.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9349.jpg



Here, we can see that I have all of the slots cut for all of the splines.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9350.jpg



Now, it's time for some glue up. I glued all of the part A's to the part B's and clamped them in my 45 clamps. I use Qtips moistened in water to clean up any squeeze out.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9351.jpg


Here, we can see the parts clamped up and waiting for the next step. Tomorrow, I will be cutting the slots for the side splines and continuing on the assembly of the frame. I hope that this thread isn't too picture heavy and I also hope that I'm not giving too much information. I'm just trying to cover the novice wood workers as well.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9353.jpg

See ya tomorrow.

Oh yeah, one more thing. I did a little calculation and for the frame of this 3 tier inbox, it calls for 2.5 BF. I checked the calculation on this, and it's actually 1.25. A little misprint, but I'm sure that you guys would have caught on to this as well.

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post #9 of 76 Old 09-19-2011, 08:19 PM
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Nice tutorial Ken. I think you are going to sell a few 3-tiered in-box projects!
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post #10 of 76 Old 09-19-2011, 08:20 PM
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Very nice tutorial for the novice. Thanks.

That's got to be the cleanest shop I've ever seen.
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post #11 of 76 Old 09-19-2011, 08:35 PM
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Very informative, thanks!

I'll be watching this thread closely. :)
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post #12 of 76 Old 09-19-2011, 09:22 PM
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You didn't waste ANY time, huh Kenbo!?

I just can't even bring myself to do the challenge seeing how thorough you are with this!

Excellent work

~tom ...it's better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt...
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post #13 of 76 Old 09-19-2011, 09:30 PM
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Ahhh, look Igor the master is in his lab again. Only this time we know what he's making.

Fantastic tutorial Ken, great to see your attention to detail played out in the pics. I wonder how many of us were looking at everything around you instead of what you were actually doing. Nice work.

A wise man once told me, "Relax and enjoy life, cause you'll never get out of here alive." RIP Dad
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post #14 of 76 Old 09-19-2011, 09:31 PM Thread Starter
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I know that I said I was going to continue tomorrow, but magically, some free time smacked me in the forehead and I headed out to the shop. So, here we go.

This is a picture of my very primitive spline jig. I mostly use it for cutting splines into my picture frames. Primitive? Yes. Does the job? Definitely. This jig is made the same way I made the other one earlier in the thread, except you make two, 2" guides and screw them at 45 degrees to the bottom of the board and 90 degrees to each other.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9352.jpg


After setting the height of my blade for the splines slots, I clamped my frame into the jig and cut one spline slot. I then unclamped the frame, reversed it, clamped it and ran it through the table saw again. I then repeated the procedure with the second frame parts that were glued together earlier.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9354.jpg


At this point, you should have something that looks like this.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9355.jpg


I then adjusted my fence 3/8" to the right, clamped my frame into the jig and repeated the whole process. Once this is done, you should have something that looks like this.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9356.jpg


Well, that is it for tonight. Honest this time. Tomorrow, I will be milling the splines and glueing them in place as well as milling the wood for the drawers and possibly starting the construction of those. I'd like to thank you guys for the kind words, they are appreciated. It was also mentioned about how clean my shop is. I pride myself on it. I clean up after each procedure and sweep all debris into a pile off to the side. If there is one piece of advice that I can give new woodworkers, it would be to get in the habit of good housekeeping. You pay a lot of money for your tools and if you keep them clean and in good working order, they will last you a lifetime. There is a huge safety factor involved here as well. We don't need to be tripping or slipping on a mess on the floor and end up hurting ourselves. Survived the saw blade, but slipped on a piece of walnut and threw your back out. Doesn't make any sense. A place for every tool and every tool in its place. Woodworking can be frustrating at times and the last thing you need is to add to the frustration by not being able to find a tool because it wasn't put back in its place. Make it a part of your woodworking day to put aside time for housekeeping. Clean as you go and I promise you, your woodworking experience will be a better one. Stay organized, stay tidy, and stay safe.
Alternative methods challenge-3 tier box-img_9357.jpg
Thanks for looking in, I'll continue tomorrow.

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post #15 of 76 Old 09-19-2011, 09:38 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by firemedic View Post
You didn't waste ANY time, huh Kenbo!?

I did take on the challenge of making all of the projects involved and they don't get done if I don't work on them. You guys know what I'm like...........once I start a project, I can't stop.


Quote:
I wonder how many of us were looking at everything around you instead of what you were actually doing.

Maybe I shouldn't have posted the last picture then.

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post #16 of 76 Old 09-19-2011, 11:18 PM
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Maybe I shouldn't have posted the last picture then.

In a way, that was the best pic of them all. I assume Mrs. Kenbo was behind the camera, tell her good job.

A wise man once told me, "Relax and enjoy life, cause you'll never get out of here alive." RIP Dad
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post #17 of 76 Old 09-19-2011, 11:31 PM Thread Starter
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In a way, that was the best pic of them all. I assume Mrs. Kenbo was behind the camera, tell her good job.

Actually, I took it myself with the timer on my camera. So, thanks for the compliment on the photo.

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post #18 of 76 Old 09-19-2011, 11:35 PM
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Wow outstanding work so far. +1 thanks on the outstanding attention to detail. Good stuff!
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post #19 of 76 Old 09-19-2011, 11:58 PM
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annnnnd consider this my official resignation from this little challenge.


Ut Prosim
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post #20 of 76 Old 09-20-2011, 09:10 AM
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Actually, I took it myself with the timer on my camera. So, thanks for the compliment on the photo.
Wow, and I do mean WOW. Ken, I counted 35 photos so far, and you are not even finished with the frame. You must be spending at least as much time on the documentation process as you are on the woodworking aspect.

I heartily applaud your time and dedication to the project. I can honestly state I learn just from carefully reading your posts and looking at the photos and using that information. Always (so far) well presented and in a logical fashion.

Good looking shop too, puts mine to shame, at least today when I have a total mess getting ready for a rummage sale and trying to build some new working tables and storage areas prior to the onset of that white stuff falling from the skies.

GREAT tutorial Ken. Always educational and enjoyable to view, please continue the outstanding work. Keep up with the OT at the day job too, we learn more here when you don't get to work. Not sure I understand your boss, but then governmental jobs are oft confusing with regulations and constraints.

Have a great day Ken. Again - awesome job on the tutorial.


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