Who do you feel makes the best Power Tools - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 26 Old 11-24-2007, 06:50 PM Thread Starter
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Who do you feel makes the best Power Tools

I am looking at HITACHI in my power tools like Band saw, Drill Press, Table Saw.

I would like to know who you think makes the best wood working tools?
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post #2 of 26 Old 11-24-2007, 07:33 PM
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I think, unless the budget is open ended, it comes down to who gives the most bang for the buck. I think Hitachi makes pretty good stuff, just going by appearance of finish, versus price, etc. Others, out there, who have actually used them will probably have a more informed opinion.

Gerry
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post #3 of 26 Old 11-24-2007, 10:45 PM
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On a budget...Ridgid for stationary and Bosch for hand held.

Geoff...
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post #4 of 26 Old 11-25-2007, 12:10 AM
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Stick with Bosch, Makita and DeWalt. They are readily available, easily serviced, reasonably priced, a good value, good solid performers under rigorous use and system-oriented for versatility.

Up until they became off-shore imports, Milwaukee and Porter Cable were excellent values. Now, they are pretty much middle-of-the-road. If you can find old new USA-made stock of either, grab it.

Ridgid makes some good tools but their recent price chopping exercises at HD makes me wonder if they're simply looking to unload the old, obsolete inventory in favor of a new and lower priced one. Perhaps they've changed Chinese factories.

Skil (Bosch), B&D and Firestorm (both B&D) are really just homeowner quality, based upon their features, specs and feel. Hitachi looks pretty good but their drill/drivers still have poor chucks. Single seleeve, preferably ratcheting, is essential for pro use. They don't except for their high-end model.

Craftsman is a mere shell of its former self. They produce and offer way too many variations on the same theme and now offer way too little as far as quality and dependability. The Craftsman your daddy once cherished is now just a mediocre off-shore substitution sold by K-Mart who owns it and Sears.

Festool is excellent but it's also the Rolex of power tools in price.

Just my 1/50th of a buck.

Don't force it. Use a bigger hammer.
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post #5 of 26 Old 11-25-2007, 06:21 AM
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It all depends....on whether you use them intensively, occasionally, or hardly ever. There are a lot of great tools out there, and I am not brand specific. Since my own woodworking is secondary to me, Grizzly serves the purpose for the shop tools.

Ladwig Construction
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post #6 of 26 Old 11-25-2007, 08:55 AM Thread Starter
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I was looking at the HITACHI for the 10" Table Saw, I don't think Makitta makes a 10" Table Saw.

Makitta for a Hand Drill, but would like to have a Makitta Drill Press, I also looked at the Hitachi Drill Press don't know how they are. I am talking about a bench drill press not a floor drill press.

Not sure who makes the best Table Band Saw?
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post #7 of 26 Old 11-25-2007, 11:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JAWS View Post
I was looking at the HITACHI for the 10" Table Saw, I don't think Makitta makes a 10" Table Saw.

Makitta for a Hand Drill, but would like to have a Makitta Drill Press, I also looked at the Hitachi Drill Press don't know how they are. I am talking about a bench drill press not a floor drill press.

Not sure who makes the best Table Band Saw?
JAWS, you could look around at Amazon.com as they pretty much have one of the largest power tool offerings anywhere. They have reviews, technical specs and pix as well as good prices.

Don't force it. Use a bigger hammer.
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post #8 of 26 Old 11-25-2007, 12:52 PM
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No one company makes the best of everything in a given class and price range. Some the of the Hitachi line represents good value IMO, but I don't find their saws to be overly competitive. "Best" is often more of a decision of class/category of the tool rather than the brand, and is also dependent on the situation it'll be used in. Cast iron and steel tools with belt driven induction motors tend to have advantages over the lighter weight aluminum and plastic tools with universal motors.

For stationary machinery, I'd checkout the offerings from Grizzly, GI, Jet, Craftsman (the newer Orion made TS and Rikon made BS are very competitive within their class and price), Delta, Rikon, Ridgid, Shop Fox, and Steel City. They all have tablesaws and and bandsaws that can be very good performers when setup well and equipped with good blades. By including the larger number of brands, you'll get a better feel for what's available, what you like, and stand a much better chance of getting a good price on comparable machines.

For portables and hand tools, I'd include names like Bosch, Milwaukee, Ridgid, PC, DW, and Makita, in addition to Hitachi.

Last edited by knotscott; 11-25-2007 at 01:06 PM.
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post #9 of 26 Old 11-25-2007, 09:32 PM
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jaws, take a look at rigid, the ts3650. Lots of features and cast iron top and wings. I'm not just giving lip service, I own one. For the price, I feel you can't beat it.
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post #10 of 26 Old 12-04-2007, 09:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JAWS View Post
I was looking at the HITACHI for the 10" Table Saw, I don't think Makitta makes a 10" Table Saw.

Makitta for a Hand Drill, but would like to have a Makitta Drill Press, I also looked at the Hitachi Drill Press don't know how they are. I am talking about a bench drill press not a floor drill press.

Not sure who makes the best Table Band Saw?
Jaws
I bought one of those Hitachi 10" table saws. One word describes it "JUNK". Do not waste your money. I sold it two months later for forty bucks just to get rid of it. And yes I warned the guy it was junk.
I bought the Rigid TS2400LS and am very happy with it for portable use.

Did you say tool sale?
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post #11 of 26 Old 12-04-2007, 11:01 AM
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Those Hitachi saws are junk. I own one that I can't bring myself to try reselling. I'm not even sure I'd be willing to give it away either. A tool is supposed to make things easier, not more difficult.

Save your money and shop around. I found a decent Craftsman tablesaw on Craigslist for under $200. It's not a cabinet saw or anything but it's easily 10x the saw my Hitachi is.

If you're against going used... I'd consider the Ridgid TS3650.
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post #12 of 26 Old 12-04-2007, 01:00 PM
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Rather than bias myself to only one or two brands, I do extensive research before purchasing any tool. I read reviews in magazines, online e-zines and even on sites like Amazon. When I have it narrowed down to the one I want I post questions on WWT.com to see who else has one and what they think about it. I also consider my usage. If it is a tool I will rarely use, I may not buy the top of the line. Another good source for reviews are the yearly tool review mags you see at the newsstands.

Ken

"What we hope ever to do with ease, we must first learn to do with diligence".
- Samuel Johnson
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post #13 of 26 Old 12-04-2007, 07:43 PM Thread Starter
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I would like to get a 10" table saw for around 100 to 150 dollars, so my question is who make the best one in that range?

Yes my shop is small and that range in price for the tools that I would like is where I am looking at.

Hope that someone would be kind and lead me in the right direction.

I would like to have a drill press, band saw and a table saw.

What other tools would come into play?

Last edited by JAWS; 12-04-2007 at 07:46 PM.
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post #14 of 26 Old 12-04-2007, 08:26 PM
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I don't know how much quality would be in a table saw in the 100-150 range. You may be better off saving a couple extra bucks to get a better saw. It will save you a lot of frustration in the long run. Have you checked out some of the hybrid saws? (Delta, Jet, Steel City)

http://www.craftandwoodworking.com
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post #15 of 26 Old 12-05-2007, 01:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodman42 View Post
Jaws
I bought one of those Hitachi 10" table saws. One word describes it "JUNK". Do not waste your money. I sold it two months later for forty bucks just to get rid of it. And yes I warned the guy it was junk.
I bought the Rigid TS2400LS and am very happy with it for portable use.
I don't want anyone to be jealous but....I scored that Ridgid saw on black Friday from Home Depot for $299 w/collapasable stand plus they threw in some other multi knife/tool gizmo at the register Last one in stock too.
I was kinda sorta waiting to get the new Bosch but for LESS than half the price the Ridgid ROCKS!!!!! Yeeeeeeeeeeeeha

Last edited by andybuildz; 12-05-2007 at 01:03 AM.
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post #16 of 26 Old 12-05-2007, 06:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JAWS View Post
I would like to get a 10" table saw for around 100 to 150 dollars, so my question is who make the best one in that range?

Yes my shop is small and that range in price for the tools that I would like is where I am looking at.

Hope that someone would be kind and lead me in the right direction.

I would like to have a drill press, band saw and a table saw.

What other tools would come into play?
A used TS is by far your best bet in that price range (IMHO). New saws in that range will be small plastic pieces of inaccurate sloppy junk, and will be mostly a waste of money, and are far more dangerous than a better quality used saw. A portable jobsite saw might be the ticket considering your space issues...Bosch, Ridgid, DeWalt, Porter Cable, & Makita are the better names in this class...some of the Ryobi or Ryobi made Craftsman jobsite saws might be depending on the model. Most wwing forums have free classifies...check them, Ebay, Craigslist, and your local paper.

Also, be sure to list your general geographic location on your profile...someone else may know of a deal for you.

Last edited by knotscott; 12-05-2007 at 06:51 AM.
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post #17 of 26 Old 12-05-2007, 09:53 AM
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Bosch Jobsite Table Saw

Just my opinions here based upon ownership and use of this saw.

I've had one for over three years and it's a proven workhorse. Accurate, easy to carry about and set up but it has certain major drawbacks IMO:

this is a good all-around rugged and accurate table saw but it's not a true woodworker's table saw for cabinetry and large projects; it was never intended as such.

cast aluminum table ~ no magnetic feather boards can be used which is a real limitation as there are only two miter slots, i.e. one on either side of the blade; the table can be easily gouged and dinged if one is not careful; even with the factory infeed/outfeed supports which are okay but not rock solid, one is really limited to the sheet size of the wood unless you have someone around to help hold the piece

decent but not expandable clamping fence ~ anything else including anti-kickback rollers has to be engineered and fabricated but size and thickness matters greatly as the table itself just isn't that big to accomodate a whole lot. After every two or three repetitive long cuts, you have to stop and double check to see if the fence might have budged a bit, as tight as it is.

mediocre stepped OE kerf splitter/anti-kickback shoe attached to one of those long floppy clear plastic blade guards; had to remove mine completely as it simply got in the way of anything I was cutting and actually became more of a danger than a help; pieces would get jammed if the guard didn't lift properly to ride on top; when it's in place, you cannot cut or slot anything thicker than a few inches thick so many dado and box cutter jobs cannot be performed with the guard in place; ergo, once the guard is removed, then there's no kerf splitter/anti-kickback shoe AND it would be a machine shop job to have one fabricated and fitted in. As there is no factory cut zero insert available without the large wide cut behind the blade, not even the plastic pop-in kerf splitters can be used. Again, a special zero insert would have to be fabricated. Bosch's zero insert is useless for adding such a kerf splitter. Hence, the anti-kickback rollers and a manual kerf splitter come into use.

miter gauge is not very accurate ~ had to go out and buy an Incra and also a special adhesive slick strip for the track so that the gauge would slide freely and smoothly.

So, it's a good compromise but not a long-term solution for a serious woodworking business to consider. For my needs, portability is essential and so this Bosch table saw fits the bill very nicely. I'm sure that similar models from DeWalt, Makita, Ridgid, and others are equally as good and equally limited in capability.

Don't force it. Use a bigger hammer.

Last edited by End Grain; 12-05-2007 at 09:57 AM.
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post #18 of 26 Old 12-05-2007, 11:47 AM Thread Starter
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Just my opinions here based upon ownership and use of this saw.

I've had one for over three years and it's a proven workhorse. Accurate, easy to carry about and set up but it has certain major drawbacks IMO:

this is a good all-around rugged and accurate table saw but it's not a true woodworker's table saw for cabinetry and large projects; it was never intended as such.

cast aluminum table ~ no magnetic feather boards can be used which is a real limitation as there are only two miter slots, i.e. one on either side of the blade; the table can be easily gouged and dinged if one is not careful; even with the factory infeed/outfeed supports which are okay but not rock solid, one is really limited to the sheet size of the wood unless you have someone around to help hold the piece

decent but not expandable clamping fence ~ anything else including anti-kickback rollers has to be engineered and fabricated but size and thickness matters greatly as the table itself just isn't that big to accomodate a whole lot. After every two or three repetitive long cuts, you have to stop and double check to see if the fence might have budged a bit, as tight as it is.

mediocre stepped OE kerf splitter/anti-kickback shoe attached to one of those long floppy clear plastic blade guards; had to remove mine completely as it simply got in the way of anything I was cutting and actually became more of a danger than a help; pieces would get jammed if the guard didn't lift properly to ride on top; when it's in place, you cannot cut or slot anything thicker than a few inches thick so many dado and box cutter jobs cannot be performed with the guard in place; ergo, once the guard is removed, then there's no kerf splitter/anti-kickback shoe AND it would be a machine shop job to have one fabricated and fitted in. As there is no factory cut zero insert available without the large wide cut behind the blade, not even the plastic pop-in kerf splitters can be used. Again, a special zero insert would have to be fabricated. Bosch's zero insert is useless for adding such a kerf splitter. Hence, the anti-kickback rollers and a manual kerf splitter come into use.

miter gauge is not very accurate ~ had to go out and buy an Incra and also a special adhesive slick strip for the track so that the gauge would slide freely and smoothly.

So, it's a good compromise but not a long-term solution for a serious woodworking business to consider. For my needs, portability is essential and so this Bosch table saw fits the bill very nicely. I'm sure that similar models from DeWalt, Makita, Ridgid, and others are equally as good and equally limited in capability.

Now here is a gentleman that will tell you the faults of the saw and is willing to guild you in the right direction. Yes the rest of you have gave me very important information also.

This is where I am asking you what would be the next step up from this saw and that gives you ALL the goodies he has told us about.

No really don't want to spend over $275.00 if I can help it. But I also would like a very solid saw also.

You guys know what you are talking about and I know how much my budget will allow, so with this in mind perhaps you will be able to guild me to the right table saw.
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post #19 of 26 Old 12-05-2007, 12:05 PM
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I think you would be better off with a good circular saw and some straight edges to be honest. You'll have more accurate cuts and you won't get any more portable than that.

If you're serious about wanting a table saw. You can find a great contractors saw in your price range used if you shop around. Keep tabs on Craigslist. I'm not even shopping for tools right now and I still watch it on a daily basis.

P.S. The poster was referring to the Bosch Jobsite saw. Which is hardly in your price range. I just wanted to add that in case you thought he was referring to the Hitachi. I can't think of any redeeming qualities that Hitachi has.

Last edited by rob.hough; 12-05-2007 at 12:07 PM.
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post #20 of 26 Old 12-05-2007, 07:30 PM
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Hi Jaws

In my area there are a lot of ads for used Craftsman 10 inch table saws in the $100 to $200 range. So, I imagine it would be similar in your area. I am not pushing Craftsman, but some of the older, cast iron saws, were actually pretty decent. Try to find one that has the extended guide bars, and the extra table extension. [Again, look for cast iron.] It won't cost a lot more, but will be very handy to have. Look for a good solid miter gauge[not plastic], and check out the fence for being solid, and easily adjustable. If the saw comes with a good balde guard/splitter, so much the better. There are saws out there, that are in your price range, but you will have to search them out. Be prepared to dicker. A lot of people have unrealistic ideas of what their older equipment is worth, while others just want to get it out of their basement/ garage/ whatever.

Good luck with the hunt

Gerry
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