Whats your take on three wheeled bandsaws? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 28 Old 06-17-2019, 05:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by falbergsawco View Post
If you want to sound ignorant on-line, keep repeating that three-wheelers break blades. My saws have three wheels and they don't break blades. period. Do I have to drag out every two-wheeler that ever broke a blade to prove it? I got calls early-on in the portable business that some customers were breaking blades sooner than expected, but most were doing OK. When I explained how blade guides, and any other deflection of the blade, constituted a turn radius far smaller than the wheels' diameters, they stopped breaking blades. Breaking blades is an operator error. I wrote an entire article about it ("Stop breaking my blades). I would re-post it if I knew where to put it. It is not because the wheels are too small. Theoretically, it would play a small proportional part but not nearly as significant as the role blade guides and tracking play. Please stop bashing three-wheelers. I worked really hard to design a portable three-wheeler that tracks tenaciously and won't break the blade. I take it personal.
Looking at your prices this is a bit like Lamborghini getting their nose out of joint because somebody threw shade at a Yugo.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #22 of 28 Old 06-17-2019, 06:35 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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size matters ........

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Originally Posted by falbergsawco View Post
I would avoid bandsaws with (small) uncrowned, plastic blade transport wheels and universal motors.

You left out the word (small), a very important difference. The diameter of cheaper 3 wheel bandsaws is typically 8" or less. Wheel size matters according to woodgears:
https://woodgears.ca/bandsaw/3-wheeled.html




The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 06-17-2019 at 07:41 PM.
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post #23 of 28 Old 06-18-2019, 11:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by falbergsawco View Post
If you want to sound ignorant on-line, keep repeating that three-wheelers break blades.
I appreciate if you have found them more functional in todays age, good luck with your business!


I can tell you that 30+ years ago, the small 3 wheelers were breaking blades - operator error - don't think so. likely the blade manufacturers weren't prepared for the demands of the 3 wheeler application. so my initial comment was dated - I will admit that! I should have clarified...
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post #24 of 28 Old 06-18-2019, 04:31 PM
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I found that article. It's still on-line but it's got some stranger's picture on the top . They spelled my name right, so hey! So I edited, copied and paste it here: Conventional wisdom would have us believe that 3-wheeled band saws inherently break
blades because they have to go around too many small wheels, instead of two big wheels. To
some irrelevant extent that might be true, but the degree of stress a blade experiences going
around a 5" radius isn’t nearly as severe as what it goes through bending around a blade guide
roller with a 1/2" radius. It doesn’t have to stay bent at that angle very long to have been bent.
Once you bend it, it’s bent. It doesn’t matter how long it stays there.

If you take two pair of pliers and “work” a blade weld from 5" on either side it’ll take a
long time and a lot of bending before the weld will fail; but move those pliers in close and you
can break a weld in seconds. So it is when the blade spins around the saw at 4500 sfpm or 455 blade revolutions per minute on a Falberg saw. It takes a long time to “overwork” a blade around
5" radii; but not long at all when the bend radius is less than 1". Especially under high tension.

The consequences, in weld breakage, of running a bandsaw blade around anything other than a transport wheel are catastrophic. When you install a blade, make sure the blade is free of obstruction; you don’t want anything touching the blade. The blade must travel directly from one transport wheel to the next. When you are sawing you must keep the kerf in line with the blade, which is still traveling directly from one wheel to the next. If the workpiece gets out of line you’ll have a tight radius turn, or two, getting back into the blade guides. You can’t see what is going on inside a deep kerf so your only visual reference is the blade’s position between the guide rollers (which are not there to keep the blade straight, but to give you a visual reference at the saw’s relationship with the workpiece ). There’s three things going on: you’re keeping the blade STRAIGHT between the transport wheels, ON the scribe line, and BETWEEN the guide rollers. Keep the saw blade between the guide rollers and trust your set angle to do the rest, cutting straight to the next wheel.

When you see the blade drifting over to one or the other guide roller, slide the saw sideways (perpendicular) immediately! to keep the blade centered between the rollers and
lined up with the kerf/scribe-line. Don’t try to cut your way back to alignment; sideways! immediately!
when you first notice the blade leaning against a guide roller. (With stationary saws, you slide the kerf back in line with the saw. If your workpiece is small enough, it will align itself just by taking your hand off of it occasionally.) As a rule, you should set the “pinch rollers” wide enough to see air between them and the blade. When you see the blade making contact with a guide roller you should immediately correct by shifting the saw (or kerf) back to center. This phenomenon becomes even more critical for those using guide blocks, as the bend radius can be very acute, especially under high tension. (Once again we see the perils of over-tensioning a narrow kerf blade).This may sound totally alien to those of you who believe blade guides should always rub against the flat of the blade to keep it running straight. You’re wrong. The urethane tires keep the blade running straight; the guides are there to serve as a visual reference or to turn the blade through tight radii.
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post #25 of 28 Old 06-18-2019, 05:10 PM
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This drawing needs to get attached to the long article I wrote about breaking blades at the weldment. But you get the picture, right?
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post #26 of 28 Old 06-18-2019, 05:22 PM
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Oh! And BTW: Wooden bandsaws suck. I wish he was making my videos for me. You'd be amazed. But there's no getting around how bad his wooden bandsaws suck.
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post #27 of 28 Old 06-18-2019, 06:54 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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There's no logical comparison .......

Quote:
Originally Posted by falbergsawco View Post
This drawing needs to get attached to the long article I wrote about breaking blades at the weldment. But you get the picture, right?



If you get you blade "wrapped around' the guide wheel like on the illustration, something has gone really wrong and it has nothing to do with the diameter of the transport wheel ... obviously, an apples to oranges comparison.


I weld my own blades from 1/4" with to 3/4" and in thicknesses from .025" to .032" and once in a while I get it misaligned. Operator error on my part.


FYI, every tool woodgears builds is made from "wood", hence his user name. Whether they suck for his application is not for us to decide. I wouldn't own one myself, but that's just me.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 06-18-2019 at 07:09 PM.
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post #28 of 28 Old 06-19-2019, 02:12 PM
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The blade is represented by the red line, but the color doesn't show anymore .(?)
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