WD-40 / Paste Was / Rust - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 19 Old 01-14-2016, 10:17 PM Thread Starter
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WD-40 / Paste Was / Rust

After delivery of a new saw and removing oil from same, will spraying down and wiping with WD-40 and applying a coat of Johnson Paste wax keep the rust at bay? Boeshield is great but not inexpensive....

Thanks!
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post #2 of 19 Old 01-14-2016, 10:50 PM
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You can spray a cast top with WD-40 when you are not going to use a machine for a while. The oil just needs to be cleaned off prior to using the machine. You don't want to get WD-40 on a project your building. Pastewax helps a lot but it needs frequent treatment to retard rust. You can't leave a thick layer of wax on a machine either and use the machine. I usually wipe off a machine with a clean dry cloth after using paste wax.
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post #3 of 19 Old 01-14-2016, 10:52 PM Thread Starter
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You can spray a cast top with WD-40 when you are not going to use a machine for a while. The oil just needs to be cleaned off prior to using the machine. You don't want to get WD-40 on a project your building. Pastewax helps a lot but it needs frequent treatment to retard rust. You can't leave a thick layer of wax on a machine either and use the machine. I usually wipe off a machine with a clean dry cloth after using paste wax.
Thanks Steve! What is a good rust inhibitor that does't have to be applied with great frequency. Ie., I can certainly wax the table once a week, no issues there. I just don't want this to rust as use for now will be infrequent. Cost aside, if it needs to be Boeshield T9 then so be it. Thanks again.

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post #4 of 19 Old 01-14-2016, 11:25 PM
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Thanks Steve! What is a good rust inhibitor that does't have to be applied with great frequency. Ie., I can certainly wax the table once a week, no issues there. I just don't want this to rust as use for now will be infrequent. Cost aside, if it needs to be Boeshield T9 then so be it. Thanks again.
Nothing I've ever used stops the rust. I use the pastewax because it cheap and simple. Still I have problems with condensation on skylights dripping on my machinery and makes spots. I just cut a scotch brite pad small enough to fit in the can and rub out these rust spots.
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post #5 of 19 Old 01-14-2016, 11:35 PM Thread Starter
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Nothing I've ever used stops the rust. I use the pastewax because it cheap and simple. Still I have problems with condensation on skylights dripping on my machinery and makes spots. I just cut a scotch brite pad small enough to fit in the can and rub out these rust spots.
Works for me, thanks!
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post #6 of 19 Old 01-15-2016, 01:47 AM
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I use paste wax on all my gear. At the moment, my shop is in my basement, and it stays at roughly 50% humidity year round. Its been nearly a year since my last application and ive got no rust. Now admittedly if you live in say, Florida, youd probably need to keep at it a little more, but i will say when i had all my machinery outside and mostly exposed to the elements i still only needed to re-wax my saw about once a month

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post #7 of 19 Old 01-15-2016, 09:51 AM
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T9 isn't that much better than WD40. It's certainly not a miracle product. It doesn't smell as bad and it tends not to stain as much as WD40. Its also a bit "slicker" and seems to spread out a little easier.

It's like Renaissance wax. It's touted as the ultimate cast iron wax, but it's not really all that much better than regular wax. It's certainly different, rubs in nicer, it's a bit slicker and maybe it lasts longer. Again, not a night & day difference, though.

Both of these products are what I use, by the way. I think it set me back about $35 for a spray can of T9 and a can of the wax about 3 years ago. I don't think I'll be replacing them any time soon.
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post #8 of 19 Old 01-15-2016, 10:14 AM Thread Starter
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T9 isn't that much better than WD40. It's certainly not a miracle product. It doesn't smell as bad and it tends not to stain as much as WD40. Its also a bit "slicker" and seems to spread out a little easier.

It's like Renaissance wax. It's touted as the ultimate cast iron wax, but it's not really all that much better than regular wax. It's certainly different, rubs in nicer, it's a bit slicker and maybe it lasts longer. Again, not a night & day difference, though.

Both of these products are what I use, by the way. I think it set me back about $35 for a spray can of T9 and a can of the wax about 3 years ago. I don't think I'll be replacing them any time soon.
Thanks Nick, appreciate the input! I'm going to order some in any event.
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post #9 of 19 Old 01-16-2016, 10:36 AM
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I use TopCote as a base layer for rust prevention. Next I apply a layer of Johnson's Paste Wax on top of the TopCote to make the surface slippery. This combination has kept my tools rust free for years. About every 6 or so months I'll take both coatings off using Mineral Spirits and then put new layers down.

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The closer it gets to the end, the faster it goes.

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post #10 of 19 Old 01-16-2016, 01:12 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Nick, appreciate the input! I'm going to order some in any event.
I bought some Boeshield T9 and once applied I take it that it should be wiped off within twenty minutes or so ('buffed' as it were) and then a coat of Johnsons Paste Wax?
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I use TopCote as a base layer for rust prevention. Next I apply a layer of Johnson's Paste Wax on top of the TopCote to make the surface slippery. This combination has kept my tools rust free for years. About every 6 or so months I'll take both coatings off using Mineral Spirits and then put new layers down.
Thanks Dave!
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post #12 of 19 Old 01-18-2016, 09:48 AM
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I bought some Boeshield T9 and once applied I take it that it should be wiped off within twenty minutes or so ('buffed' as it were) and then a coat of Johnsons Paste Wax?
I do it the other way around. Here's my basic maintenance:

When the surface becomes "unacceptable" due to gunk buildup and/or rust, I use WD40 and a rag to first clean. If necessary, I sand with 220 grit with an RO sander.

Next I take about 1/2 of an old 3m scotch-brite abrasive pad, pick up some wax onto it and buff it into the surface. If it's really bad, I'll either use the pad and WD 40 or just give it another go with a new pad.

It should be pretty slick at this point. Next I spray on a generous coat of T9 and use about 1/2 of one of those disposable shop rags to spread, but leaving the surface slightly damp.

Every once in a while (especially if I feel any friction) or at the end of a work day (if I remember), I use the T9 again.
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post #13 of 19 Old 01-18-2016, 10:16 AM Thread Starter
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I do it the other way around. Here's my basic maintenance:

When the surface becomes "unacceptable" due to gunk buildup and/or rust, I use WD40 and a rag to first clean. If necessary, I sand with 220 grit with an RO sander.

Next I take about 1/2 of an old 3m scotch-brite abrasive pad, pick up some wax onto it and buff it into the surface. If it's really bad, I'll either use the pad and WD 40 or just give it another go with a new pad.

It should be pretty slick at this point. Next I spray on a generous coat of T9 and use about 1/2 of one of those disposable shop rags to spread, but leaving the surface slightly damp.

Every once in a while (especially if I feel any friction) or at the end of a work day (if I remember), I use the T9 again.
Thanks Nick!
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post #14 of 19 Old 01-23-2016, 06:08 AM
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Can any paste wax be used on a cast iron top? I know that Johnsons is the best, but it is not available locally for me. So would Turtle Wax paste wax or Mothers paste wax work? I have read not to use automotive waxes, but I am not sure if that is true, or if any paste wax will be ok?
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post #15 of 19 Old 01-23-2016, 07:07 AM
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Can any paste wax be used on a cast iron top? I know that Johnsons is the best, but it is not available locally for me. So would Turtle Wax paste wax or Mothers paste wax work? I have read not to use automotive waxes, but I am not sure if that is true, or if any paste wax will be ok?
Sure, any paste wax would work however automotive waxes might be a little thin. Still they could be used. The more often you use a wax the better however be sure to wipe off the excess with a clean cloth. Otherwise wax off the machine may rub off on the wood.

Don't use any kind of aerosol wax or silicone lubricant on a machine. Aerosol waxes contain silicone and when you get silicone on wood even a slight trace will cause the finish you put on that wood to fisheye like is pictured at the left.
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post #16 of 19 Old 01-23-2016, 10:32 AM
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The best solution is obviously humidity control. I run a dehumidifier 24-7 in the spring and summer months (I have a detached shop building, unheated and not air conditioned). The next best thing is clean! Sawdust will draw moisture, so I brush or blow my machine(s) down before closing up shop for the night. I also keep air constantly moving in the shop. I have found that good circulation can make a difference. A simple box fan does wonders.

Hoppes #9 gun oil is a decent chemical option, though it is not cheap either. I, however, got away from that practice simply because of possible residue transfer to the wood when using the tool.

With what I do above, I seem to have little to no rust issue. I may wax once every six months or so, but that's mostly for slick tables, not rust control.

Another $000,000,000.02 worth of advice,
Mark
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post #17 of 19 Old 01-23-2016, 12:53 PM
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For surfaces that are not easy to wax, my favorite preventive LPS 2 lubricant.

When I had a boat I kept the engines and any other metal in the engine room covered in it. Was excellent preventive. If it works in a salt air environment it will work most places. I also use it around the house.

On a table saw top, jointer, etc this does not replace the coat of paste wax.

George

PS. I buy by the gallon and refill the sprayer. Locally I buy at a marine supplier. I think I paid $3x.xx per gallon.
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post #18 of 19 Old 01-23-2016, 04:03 PM
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Can any paste wax be used on a cast iron top? I know that Johnsons is the best, but it is not available locally for me. So would Turtle Wax paste wax or Mothers paste wax work? I have read not to use automotive waxes, but I am not sure if that is true, or if any paste wax will be ok?
I dunno about using an automotive wax. Most of them seem to have a lot more than just wax in them, and id be worried about something transferring g to the wood and affecting the finish. Silicon is the obvious worry, but I'd wager there's more than that. Johnson's is sold at Lowes if there's one of those close to you, and home depot usually carries the minwax brand stuff.

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post #19 of 19 Old 01-23-2016, 09:20 PM Thread Starter
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The best solution is obviously humidity control. I run a dehumidifier 24-7 in the spring and summer months (I have a detached shop building, unheated and not air conditioned). The next best thing is clean! Sawdust will draw moisture, so I brush or blow my machine(s) down before closing up shop for the night. I also keep air constantly moving in the shop. I have found that good circulation can make a difference. A simple box fan does wonders.

Hoppes #9 gun oil is a decent chemical option, though it is not cheap either. I, however, got away from that practice simply because of possible residue transfer to the wood when using the tool.

With what I do above, I seem to have little to no rust issue. I may wax once every six months or so, but that's mostly for slick tables, not rust control.
I've wondered if Safarilands CLP would work well....
https://www.safariland.com/gun-lubri...ant-15337.html
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