Uses for a jigsaw? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 34 Old 09-12-2012, 12:24 AM
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I use my jigsaw all the time. There are really countless occasions for its use on staircases, especially curved staircases. It does take some practice to get good results. IMO the learning curve for it is a little steeper than many other tools.

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post #22 of 34 Old 09-12-2012, 04:20 AM Thread Starter
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I'm talking about a hand held jig saw. This critter for example:

http://www.ryobitools.com/catalog/po...ll_saws/JS451L

I'm never sure what to call the things either. My current vocabulary is that I use "scroll saw" to refer to stationary tools with thin blades.

We also have a very old Black and Decker jigsaw. It runs but I don't like it. It's very wimpy, for one. Also, there's no trigger for on and off. You hit a switch on the side for one of two speeds and the thing stays on until you hit the switch again. I get very nervous using handheld power cutting tools without a trigger switch.

The old jig saw does allow the blade to swivel and move during a cut. I've never found it that useful but I figured it was on there for a reason.

And you are correct; the learning curve for a jigsaw does seem higher than other tools. I used them to make straight cuts and frankly could never cut a straight line with a jigsaw.
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post #23 of 34 Old 09-12-2012, 05:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vinnypatternmaker View Post
Hi!
Forgive me, but I have my dunce cap on today ! Some may argue that I wear it most days!
Whatever, I'm confused...are we speaking of hand held scroll saws, or bench mounted 5" - 6" blade length x 16" - 24"+ center-cut capacity jig saws?
PS...the loose terms jig/scroll are often interchanged, only adding to the confusion !
Best,
Vinny
We were talking hand held jig saw, one come ith a knob that turns the blade hitch is called a scrolling jig saw. Then there are scrolling blades for the jig saw.

The bench scroll saw is a whole different saw as you described.
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post #24 of 34 Old 09-12-2012, 05:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vinnypatternmaker View Post
Hi!
Forgive me, but I have my dunce cap on today ! Some may argue that I wear it most days!
Whatever, I'm confused...are we speaking of hand held scroll saws, or bench mounted 5" - 6" blade length x 16" - 24"+ center-cut capacity jig saws?
PS...the loose terms jig/scroll are often interchanged, only adding to the confusion !
Best,
Vinny
To add more to the confusion the original term "jig saw" referred to a hand held tool with the blade affixed at both ends (often used to make jigsaw puzzles way back when ) and now is commonly known as a "coping" saw. The term also referred to a motorized tool with the blade affixed at both ends such as this one below (similar to the first one I had) and that evolved into what most now call a "scroll saw'.

http://vintagemachinery.org/photoind...l.aspx?id=3488

What most now call a "jigsaw" (what the OP is referring to) is technically a "sabre" saw since the blade is only affixed at one end and what we call a reciprocating saw is technically a form of sabre saw also.

In any case as mentioned these are very versatile tools that can do a variety of tasks with the proper blade and personally I wouldn't be without one!
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post #25 of 34 Old 09-13-2012, 05:19 PM
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Do they make a good quality blade that will cut thru about 2" of pine? 1/2 inch sheets glued together. My brother was asking me, but wasn't sure if they made a blade long enough, that wouldn't stray off line on the bottom.
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post #26 of 34 Old 09-13-2012, 05:28 PM
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This depends on the amount of travel with your particular JS.

Bosch offers some extra long blades that might suit your purpose.

http://www.boschtools.com/Products/A...pid=1328#specs

It seems to me that the longer blades would have inherently more drift at the bottom of the cut and you would have to slow the rate of cut accordingly.

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post #27 of 34 Old 09-13-2012, 05:30 PM
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I expect you can find a blade to cut the depth, but I will be very surprised if the blade does not wander in the cut, even if you are cutting a straight line with a straight edge to guide the jigsaw.

I have never been happy with my deep cuts, even with a straight edge. All it takes is one portion of the wood to be denser and it will begin to track to the softer side.

If you need to cut freehand and on a curve, I would expect even more problems with tracking, even with a good blade.
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post #28 of 34 Old 09-13-2012, 05:47 PM
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Thanks JH and Dp. I thought that also, just with what I had used a js before, it always seemed pretty hard, to me, to keep it on track.

I quess, with a good stiff blade, you could ease(?) into the cut without much force and get it done, but I am thinking it would take a while to cut. All dependant on design, tighter curves, etc...

thanks again

JJ
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post #29 of 34 Old 09-13-2012, 06:25 PM
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JJ,

If you're cutting inside curves or outside curves you can make your cut well off the finished line of your workpiece to the waste side of the cut.

This will give you a little "insurance" that blade drift will not damage the finished workpiece.

Then sand to the finish line using a spindle sander or a drum sanding attachment on a drill press for inside curves.

For outside curves a belt sander can be used.

I have one of these:

http://www.ridgid.com/tools/oscillat...r/en/index.htm

It offers both spindle and belt sanding options at a great price. It provides ample support for the workpiece thus insuring that you're always sanding at the desired angle (from 90° to 45°).

Another option is one of these:

http://www.portercable.com/Products/...6187.6223.6241

a less costly alternative but IMO less desirable for sanding outside curves and straight workpieces in terms of final results.

When I die, I want to go peacefully like my grandfather did — in his
sleep. Not yelling and screaming like the passengers in his car.

Jack Handey
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post #30 of 34 Old 09-13-2012, 06:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jharris2
JJ,

If you're cutting inside curves or outside curves you can make your cut well off the finished line of your workpiece to the waste side of the cut.

This will give you a little "insurance" that blade drift will not damage the finished workpiece.

Then sand to the finish line using a spindle sander or a drum sanding attachment on a drill press for inside curves.

For outside curves a belt sander can be used.

I have one of these:

http://www.ridgid.com/tools/oscillat...r/en/index.htm

It offers both spindle and belt sanding options at a great price. It provides ample support for the workpiece thus insuring that you're always sanding at the desired angle (from 90° to 45°).

Another option is one of these:

http://www.portercable.com/Products/...6187.6223.6241

a less costly alternative but IMO less desirable for sanding outside curves and straight workpieces in terms of final results.


Uses for a jigsaw?-image-261365489.jpg

These beams were either 8 x 2 or 10 x 2. I cut them using my jig saw. With a little expertise you develop the art of cutting without any significant blade wonder if you are a reasonable judge of square. All these beams required little sanding. If the beams had bean rough sawn as opposed to planed all round I would have got away with no sanding as there was little to no wonder.

The trick for me is this. With those beams I sat on them and cut towards myself and then as soon as I saw the slightest deviation from square (by keeping a close eye on the visible part of the blade above the cut) I compensated by applying a little side pressure to correct the cut.

Dave The Turning Cowboy

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post #31 of 34 Old 09-13-2012, 07:00 PM
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I routinely use my jigsaw to cut within an 1/8th of an inch of the line on a template and then sand to final dimension. I am of the opinion that if you ever use a good jigsaw like a Bosch you will find it has many uses. Mine runs like a sewing machine. I am always impressed with the cuts we make together.
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post #32 of 34 Old 09-13-2012, 07:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveTTC

These beams were either 8 x 2 or 10 x 2. I cut them using my jig saw. With a little expertise you develop the art of cutting without any significant blade wonder if you are a reasonable judge of square. All these beams required little sanding. If the beams had bean rough sawn as opposed to planed all round I would have got away with no sanding as there was little to no wonder.

The trick for me is this. With those beams I sat on them and cut towards myself and then as soon as I saw the slightest deviation from square (by keeping a close eye on the visible part of the blade above the cut) I compensated by applying a little side pressure to correct the cut.

Dave The Turning Cowboy
Just like to add, with this particular job I cut to the line. If I had to match something else dimensionally I would have cut slightly off the line and sanded to the line. Again with this job it was all done on-site so I clamped 4 beams together and sanded them with my orbital sander.

Dave The Turning Cowboy

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post #33 of 34 Old 09-13-2012, 11:02 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the suggestions guys. I always found a jigsaw to be a bit of pain, but perhaps straight cuts aren't really its strength.
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post #34 of 34 Old 09-15-2012, 04:58 PM
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Become familiar with it, find a place for it in your shop, and sometimes it will be just what you need.

I bought a Fein Multimaster kit a year or 2 ago because I couldn't believe the price. I still think it was a mistake. I've only used it a couple of times, but when I did, nothing else would have done the job as well.
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