Thoughts on new tablesaw purchase - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 18 Old 07-28-2016, 11:44 AM Thread Starter
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Thoughts on new tablesaw purchase

I am looking to make my first table saw purchase after using a friends Hitachi hybrid saw for several years. I think I want to go with a Grizzly brand saw; this seems like a good compromise between quality and value. I am going to take a look at a ShopFox saw also.

My decision is whether to go with the less expensive hybrid table saw or step up to the lower end of the cabinet saws. I want to get away from having issues with wood burn and saw marks when making my cuts. My wood ranges from working with soft pine to the hardwoods up to 2" thick. Will I still see these issues with the 2hp motor in hybrid saws?

Any advice would be appreciated. I am also open to other brands if anyone has recommendations.
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post #2 of 18 Old 07-28-2016, 12:31 PM
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I have an old hybrid saw now and I can't wait until I can afford to upgrade to a bigger and better saw. The relatively weak motor and table size are my biggest gripes with my current saw; and the fence, of course. I've been watching the Grizzly stuff, too, for the same reasons as you stated. I'm leaning toward the 1023RL when I'm ready to pull the trigger, but I don't know when that will be. There always seems to be more stuff that needs my money than there is money. Fortunately, I have a friend with a very nice UniSaw that I use when I need to cut more than I trust doing on my saw.

Good luck and let us know what you decide on.
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post #3 of 18 Old 07-28-2016, 03:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLAwoodwork View Post
I am looking to make my first table saw purchase after using a friends Hitachi hybrid saw for several years. I think I want to go with a Grizzly brand saw; this seems like a good compromise between quality and value. I am going to take a look at a ShopFox saw also.

My decision is whether to go with the less expensive hybrid table saw or step up to the lower end of the cabinet saws. I want to get away from having issues with wood burn and saw marks when making my cuts. My wood ranges from working with soft pine to the hardwoods up to 2" thick. Will I still see these issues with the 2hp motor in hybrid saws?

Any advice would be appreciated. I am also open to other brands if anyone has recommendations.
With any saw and a crappy blade you will all kinds of issues, a quality blade on lesser of a saw not so much.

For many 2 HP is sufficient when the money saved is spent on saw blades.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #4 of 18 Old 07-28-2016, 03:09 PM
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Most professional cabinet saws are large and heavy. Too large and heavy to move around easily in a small shop. If you have the space, the cabinet saws are ideal. If you're cramped for space, the contractor saws can be a good choice because they can be put on a rolling stand that makes them easily moveable.
I have a small shop. I chose to sell my cabinet saw and purchased a contractor saw to replace it.
It works best for me. The cabinet saw was just too large and heavy for my little shop.
Basically this: big shop, go with big equipment
Small shop, go with equipment that fits.
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If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #5 of 18 Old 07-28-2016, 03:25 PM
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Great advice from previous posts. Also consider the "footprint" of any TS, and will it fit in the space to work safely. Not only should a TS fit your work needs - now and in the future, but fit your $ budget too."Wood burn and saw marks" can be caused by a number of issues - blade choice, fence alignment, feed of the material, etc. and can happen on ANY TS. There are reviews (on line/magazine) that may give you more info on choosing a TS. Be safe.
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post #6 of 18 Old 07-28-2016, 04:25 PM
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A new saw going to solve any of the problems you're having. Burn an saw marks are caused more by problems with the blade or alignment issues, best to start there
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post #7 of 18 Old 07-28-2016, 05:40 PM
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Originally Posted by epicfail48 View Post
A new saw going to solve any of the problems you're having. Burn an saw marks are caused more by problems with the blade or alignment issues, best to start there
He is correct. A new saw will not necessarily solve these problems. Before sinking in more money, work on getting all alignments correct and good blades.

George
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post #8 of 18 Old 07-28-2016, 10:15 PM
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I agree about burn marks.

When buying a tablesaw, a jointer, a bandsaw or a planer, my advice is to buy the last one first. Don't buy a succession of sub-standard equipment, heavy duty equipment is easier to learn on, safer and will last longer.

"Buy the one you're going to end up with first!" -- My lovely wife

For a tablesaw, power, power, power.

I ended up with a JET JTAS 10.

Five horsepower, and I've never thought to myself "oh, wait, it's too powerful."

"When I have your wounded." -- Major Charles L. Kelley, callsign "Dustoff", refusing to recognize that an LZ was too hot, moments before before being killed by a single shot, July 1, 1964.

Last edited by Jammersix; 07-29-2016 at 12:19 AM.
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post #9 of 18 Old 07-29-2016, 12:48 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the responses. With my new space, I have ample space to accommodate a large tablesaw and 220V 20A power. I am having the thoughts that Jammersix mentioned. I don't want to go with the smaller saw and wishing I had bought the large a year later.

And I understand that the burns and saw marks are caused in large part due to fence alignment and blade. The fence on the Hitachi was not great and I had plenty of issues with getting a proper alignment. I think I am just really set on the Grizzly 1023 or 690 and just wanted to validate my thoughts before making the big purchase.
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post #10 of 18 Old 07-29-2016, 03:45 AM
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If I had it to do over again, this is the saw I would look at:

http://www.grizzly.com/products/10-5...campaign=zPage

It's about the price I paid for my JET twenty years ago.

That said, my lovely wife asked me a few days ago if I remembered what I paid for my tablesaw, my air equipment, my dust collector or my jointer. I wasn't even close on most of them.

Her point was this: money spent on tools is never wasted, and if you buy first class equipment in the first place, twenty years later you'll still be using it, and you will have forgotten what you paid for it.

She was annoyed with me because I'd just bought a cheap, portable drill press to use teaching young girls at a STEM camp, and I had gone the cheap-skate route. (I'm the cheap one of the two of us.)

She's probably right. I'm already having problems with the drill press, I should have bought a first class unit, especially for teaching.

"When I have your wounded." -- Major Charles L. Kelley, callsign "Dustoff", refusing to recognize that an LZ was too hot, moments before before being killed by a single shot, July 1, 1964.
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post #11 of 18 Old 07-29-2016, 09:18 AM
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I've never been disappointed when I buy the best .... With the amount of work I do,
there's probably no way I can justify the cost my SawStop PCS .... But, like the other
quality tools I have, I've never regretted it.... "Buying the last tool first" is good advice...
My RAS, drill press, joiner, chop saw, and bandsaw are all over 30 years old... All bought
new... The only stationary tool I replaced was my 113.******x Crartsman table saw last
year, at the insistence of my sweet wife of 40 years....
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post #12 of 18 Old 07-29-2016, 09:54 AM
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It's very possible to get good service from a decent hybrid saw, but there is a substantial difference in the operation and robustness of an industrial cabinet saw under the hood. You can't tell the difference when you look at a piece of wood cut by the two types of saws, but the user can certainly tell which saw he's using when making the cuts. In a nut shell, everything on a cabinet saw tends to be more robust, often has smoother operation, and tends to have better long term reliability. Extra mass provides more stability and lower vibration, significantly more horsepower means less strain on the motor with no lugging, allowing the operator to dictate the cutting speed vs the saw dictating it. There's also less sensitivity to setup and blade choice, larger handwheels operate more smoothly, and they tend to hold value quite well. An industrial cabinet saw is a luxury for a hobbyist, but is one that I really enjoy having, and it happens to come at a price that's only nominally higher than a decent hybrid when you choose something like the Griz G1023RL. If you've got 220v and the budget room, I recommend the cabinet saw.... it's a step I've never regretted.

G1023RL:



Typical hybrid:

Last edited by notskot; 07-29-2016 at 09:59 AM.
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post #13 of 18 Old 07-29-2016, 12:08 PM
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I have had many saws over the years, from Craftsman to a couple Delta contractor saws and a Jet Supersaw which I recently sold. I bought the Grizzly 690 and wish I had done it years ago. I have some very minor issues with it, (the blade washers), but am very pleased with it so far. I use a Delta Unisaw and Powermatic 66 at work. Wouldn't trade my Grizzly for either of them. (the Powermatic is nearly 20 years old though) =)
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post #14 of 18 Old 08-01-2016, 12:26 AM
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I have a Delta Cabinet Saw that is 1-3/4 HP and I have never wished it was more powerful. I do a lot of cabinets and built-ins and it works great. If money was no object, then by all means a 3 or 5 HP, why not? But I paid about $1000.00 for my Delta and have been hitting it pretty hard for 10 years, and it has been a great performer. A comparable saw is a little more than that nowadays. If I was a millionaire, I would probably buy the biggest baddest SawStop they make, just because I like my fingers the way they are.
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post #15 of 18 Old 08-08-2016, 09:38 AM
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My 1946 Unisaw has a 1hp motor. (old horses had more power!) My friends Uni has a 3hp motor. (New horses)
I wouldn't trade for his. The 1 hp motor is a RI 1625 rpm motor, that is smoother than the 3 hp, and cuts what I throw at it.
I'm sure if I cut 3" oak a lot, I would appreciate the added hp.

The old RI 1 hp Unisaw's are a great find for a home shop. Especially if limited to 120 volt power.

Cabinet saws take up less space than a contractor saw. Assuming the same fence/table setup)
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post #16 of 18 Old 08-08-2016, 01:14 PM
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I'm by no means a professional or have anywhere near the experience of some of the wood workers here, but I did just buy a new ridgid table saw. I bought the R4513 10" portable saws w/stand on Black Friday for $300 because it was what I could afford as a college student. I have to say I Absolutely LOVE this saw, mainly because it's portable. If I need space for a project I just wheel it into a corner, if I don't want to sweep dust I wheel it outside the garage shop and the dust blows away. I have a 2 car garage packed with tools and huge work bench. I could not live without the portability of this saw. Plus with a new good quality blade it cuts black walnut like butter. I'd love to have a giant cabinet saw, but for me, portability is as Trump would say-UUUGE!


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post #17 of 18 Old 08-08-2016, 01:51 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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I think I have one of every type

From a 800 lb. 5 HP 12" Powermatic to a Bosch 10" 4000 portable, a 10" hybrid, and a few direct drive 12":" Craftsman. Each has it's place in a well equipped shop.

Any on site work requires a saw you can heft in and out of your work truck without straining your back. Most sheet goods and solid lumber projects can be done on the hybrid or the Craftsman 12". Ripping 2" or 3" hardwood for hours at a time requires both the power and depth of cut from the 12" Powermatic.

So which saw is "best" depends on the type of project and the thickness of the material. Sheet goods like plywood and particle board don't require much power, but a large support surface makes handling them easier and safer.

A job site saw is usually confined to a tippsy stand and some roller supports for ripping. It's not the best setup, but It will work for a whole lot of cuts. Most contractors set the smaller saw inside a 4 X 8 sheet of plywood on saw horses or some other form of stand.
A stationary cast iron table saw is a step up from the portables, but storage and foot print come into play for a small shop.

The fence is the heart of the table saw, and the best fences lock on the front rail only with a locking cam which aligns the fence parallel to the blade each time it's locked down.

There's a new player in town these days and from what I have read it's a great idea for a portable:
https://www.amazon.com/SKILSAW-SPT70...kill+table+saw

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 08-08-2016 at 04:45 PM.
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post #18 of 18 Old 08-08-2016, 10:56 PM
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I have had the grizzly 1023rlwx for about 2 years and have loved it. Never regretted anything about it. It's been a great saw and I use it almost everyday, sometimes all day :)

wish I had a cool line like everyone else...
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