Table Saw Safety And Construction Grade Wood - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 13 Old 05-12-2013, 11:52 AM Thread Starter
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Table Saw Safety And Construction Grade Wood

is it safe to rip dried wood studs on a table saw if they have some knotts, bowing or cupping in them?

I sometimes use cheap 2 X 4s from home depot to simulate a reclaimed wood look, since they tend to be a little bit gnarled. their crappy appearance actually helps give them a reclaimed / reused look.

but I read somewhere that you shouldn't try and rip this type of lumber on a table saw due to the higher risk of kickback. is that true?

and one more safety question if I may:

for people who bought old craftsman table saws, is it easy to find splitter a, blade guards, pawls and other safety Accessories for them?

Studies have shown that having a ladder in the home is more dangerous than having a firearm. That's why I own 10 guns... in case some maniac tries to sneak a ladder into my house...
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post #2 of 13 Old 05-12-2013, 12:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grunkle Stan View Post
is it safe to rip dried wood studs on a table saw if they have some knotts, bowing or cupping in them?

I sometimes use cheap 2 X 4s from home depot to simulate a reclaimed wood look, since they tend to be a little bit gnarled. their crappy appearance actually helps give them a reclaimed / reused look.

but I read somewhere that you shouldn't try and rip this type of lumber on a table saw due to the higher risk of kickback. is that true?

and one more safety question if I may:

for people who bought old craftsman table saws, is it easy to find splitter a, blade guards, pawls and other safety Accessories for them?



Stan.
Most of these items are on e-bay regularly but some sellers are very proud of their old parts. You can usually find what you need at a reasonable price if you shop.
I've never tried to work with rough lumber on my table saw but I've seen many recommendations about nailing it to a strait edge and then ripping. I have a friend that cleans up his rough stuff on his band saw.
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post #3 of 13 Old 05-12-2013, 12:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grunkle Stan View Post
is it safe to rip dried wood studs on a table saw if they have some knotts, bowing or cupping in them?

I sometimes use cheap 2 X 4s from home depot to simulate a reclaimed wood look, since they tend to be a little bit gnarled. their crappy appearance actually helps give them a reclaimed / reused look.

but I read somewhere that you shouldn't try and rip this type of lumber on a table saw due to the higher risk of kickback. is that true?

and one more safety question if I may:

for people who bought old craftsman table saws, is it easy to find splitter a, blade guards, pawls and other safety Accessories for them?
I feel such operations are risky at best, and may not being safe.

Knots are "it depends". I have cut through some knots easily on a table saw. In some cases I can see it is too dense, then I would use a band saw.

Bowing is perhaps the most risky, since my experiences is that the studs are bowed and warped. I would prefer to rip these on a band saw, or for wider boards, a straight edge and circular saw.

Cupping is also "it depends". Cupping across the width may be possible on the table saw, if the cup is down and the wood is making consistent contact with the table saw top. Another case where band saw or circular saw is less risky.

A couple of places to look for the safety accessories.

The BORK store.
http://theborkstore.com/

The SHARK guard.
http://www.thesharkguard.com/crman.php
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post #4 of 13 Old 05-12-2013, 01:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grunkle Stan View Post
is it safe to rip dried wood studs on a table saw if they have some knotts, bowing or cupping in them?

yes, provided it's done safely and the work piece is flat. this may mean using a jig to get a straight edge and a jointer to flatten a work piece.

I sometimes use cheap 2 X 4s from home depot to simulate a reclaimed wood look, since they tend to be a little bit gnarled. their crappy appearance actually helps give them a reclaimed / reused look.

but I read somewhere that you shouldn't try and rip this type of lumber on a table saw due to the higher risk of kickback. is that true?

using a splitter/blade guard greatly reduces the risk of kickback when using any form of dimensional material.

and one more safety question if I may:

for people who bought old craftsman table saws, is it easy to find splitter a, blade guards, pawls and other safety Accessories for them?

yes
here's a splitter/blade guard assembly:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/CRAFTSMAN-10...item257cf2e48e

and this is an excellent source of OEM c-man and ridgid TS parts:

http://www.m-and-d.com/results_sql.h...9781&x=28&y=10

there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.
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post #5 of 13 Old 05-12-2013, 06:15 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you gentlemen.

Studies have shown that having a ladder in the home is more dangerous than having a firearm. That's why I own 10 guns... in case some maniac tries to sneak a ladder into my house...
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post #6 of 13 Old 05-12-2013, 06:18 PM
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The answer is, NO it is not safe to rip anything that will not fit against your table saw fence. You need another guide source.
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post #7 of 13 Old 05-12-2013, 06:22 PM
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kick back

Kickback occurs for a couple of reasons.... the board closes on the rear of the rotating blade, locks upon it and it rotates up and over coming back at you. A splitter will keep the kerf open and "generally" not allow that to happen. The wood may also open up and wedge against the blade and and fence jamming up everything and stalling out the motor.


Another cause is the workpiece rotates away from the fence at the rear and catches the back of the blade, rises up and around and comes back at you. A splitter will "generally" prevent this.

Another cause is the board is not laying flat on the table surface all along it's length.....it's twisted. When the twist is enough to wedge either the blade or the fence, a kickback can occur.

It's always best to have one straight and flat surface and one 90 degree edge up against the fence, when sawing wood on the tablesaw... ripping.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 05-12-2013 at 08:43 PM. Reason: added another reason....
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post #8 of 13 Old 05-12-2013, 06:23 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the explanation.

I have seen suggestions that you screw the bowed workpiece to a straight piece of wood so that the workpiece overhangs a bit. Put the straight piece along the fence, and then you can take the "bow" out of the part of the workpiece that overhangs.

Then unscrew it and flip it over (so the now square side rides against the fence) and then rip it that way.

Seems like a lot of work though.

Studies have shown that having a ladder in the home is more dangerous than having a firearm. That's why I own 10 guns... in case some maniac tries to sneak a ladder into my house...
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post #9 of 13 Old 05-12-2013, 06:28 PM
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That is the case

But you either have to joint the edge or use a Board Straightening Jig to get a lot of boards safely prepared to rip. A long straight edge attached to the workpiece will also work, but the key is a secure attachment. Small nails that can be pulled afterward work best for many here.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/b...ble-saw-16999/




OR This: http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/g...jointer-12927/

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #10 of 13 Old 05-12-2013, 10:47 PM
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It can happen for a board to close up on a blade and pinch it but that can happen with any wood. I frequently rip construction grade wood and the biggest risk is catching a knot in the face. A full face shield is good. I can remember catching a pine knot on my upper lip just under my nose. The safest way to rip such wood if you don't have a guard on your saw is rip it half way through, lift it off the blade, turn it around and rip the other half. That way you are several feet away from the blade. If it kicks just let it go and get out of the way.
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post #11 of 13 Old 05-13-2013, 03:54 AM
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Along with all the suggestions would be to have a proper blade for ripping. A good positive hook carbide tipped 20T to 32T ten inch blade works well. A proper blade will help minimize forcing the stock to be cut. For lower powered saws, a thin kerf blade might work better.







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post #12 of 13 Old 05-13-2013, 03:02 PM Thread Starter
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"For lower powered saws, a thin kerf blade might work better."

So for an underpowered "bench top" saw, what would be a good thin kerf blade for ripping 2X3 pine / white wood, and the occasional 3/4 inch thick hardwood?

Also with an underpowered saw, is it better to rip halfway through the depth of a 2X3, flip it over, and then rip from the other direction?

Meaning rip with the good side face down, flip the piece over (keeping the straight edge against the fence), and rip again with the good side face up / bad side face down?

(or is it unlikely that the cuts will line up?)

And lastly, if it is an underpowered bench type saw, would it be wise to use a smaller blade (say, 7 and 1/4) instead of the full 10 inch blade, even though it is a 10-inch capable saw?

Studies have shown that having a ladder in the home is more dangerous than having a firearm. That's why I own 10 guns... in case some maniac tries to sneak a ladder into my house...
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post #13 of 13 Old 05-13-2013, 04:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grunkle Stan View Post
And lastly, if it is an underpowered bench type saw, would it be wise to use a smaller blade (say, 7 and 1/4) instead of the full 10 inch blade, even though it is a 10-inch capable saw?
I prefer a single rip. It is difficult to avoid a cut line in the middle ripping half way through with two passes.

I know people who routinely use 7 or 7 1/4in blade in their 10in cabinet saw. It does take a lot less power due to thinner kerf, and also means much less risk of kick-back. The downside is reducing cutting thickness capacity and the blade can flex more due to being thinner. Also the cut will not be as smooth as a good 10in dia carbide tooth blade.

The 7 - 7 1/4in blades are not expensive, so buy one and see if it works for you.

You may need a custom zero clearance insert. I like to use ZCI on my table saw unless I am doing a bevel cut.
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