Suggestions for a circular saw? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 1Likes
  • 1 Post By woodnthings
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 18 Old 03-09-2017, 02:11 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 16
View Michael_JL's Photo Album My Photos
Suggestions for a circular saw?

I've been borrowing a run of the mill Skil Saw, but I need to get my own. What are some suggestions for the best value in the $100-$125 range? Weight isn't a particular concern for me, I need it to be durable and accurate. In addition to regular uses, I use it a lot for ripping planks as I don't have room for a table saw.

Thanks for any suggestions
Michael_JL is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 18 Old 03-09-2017, 02:23 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,876
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
best for ripping ....

There are 2 types od circular saws, a sidwinder and a worm drive. The worm drive has reduction gearing giving it more torque. Here's an explanation of both types as well as the righty vs lefty blade location:


To add to your confusion... the new 20 V battery saws have great power and then there's the new Dewalt 60 v dual battery saw. I don't use either my sidewinder or wormdrive saws unless I'm gonna do some serious ripping. I always reach for one of the 18 V battery saws by Milwaukee, Dewalt or Rigid in the shop. For serious ripping I would stick with a worm drive, corded saw.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 03-09-2017 at 02:28 PM.
woodnthings is online now  
post #3 of 18 Old 03-09-2017, 08:38 PM
The Nut in the Cellar
 
Jim Frye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Northwest Ohio
Posts: 1,027
View Jim Frye's Photo Album My Photos
I have an ancient B&D circular saw (my ex neighbor used it for two years to cut concrete) that works fine with a carbide blade. However, since acquiring an 18 volt cordless saw, the old B&D has sat unused for years. I use the cordless for breaking down sheet goods and cutting construction lumber.

Jim Frye
I've gone out to find myself. If I return before I get back, have me wait for me.
"Sawdust is Man Glitter"
Jim Frye is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 18 Old 03-10-2017, 12:14 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Illanoyed
Posts: 308
View Tree Hugger's Photo Album My Photos
This looks pretty close to what I have .
I had a skill saw once ..hated every time I used it.......it's a pleasure using the porter cable


https://www.amazon.com/PORTER-CABLE-.../dp/B00BMLWL6W

Knot Stumped ...just confused once in a while.
Tree Hugger is offline  
post #5 of 18 Old 03-10-2017, 12:59 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 63
View GFOviedo's Photo Album My Photos
This is what I use. The battery last for hours. I used it once for over 4 hours, and it was running strong. I checked that battery, and it had 2 bars after 4 hours of cutting 2x4's, 4x4's and plywood. I got lucky and got mine for $140. I bought it in a combo with a hammer and impact drill, it came with 3 batteries and 1 9.0 high demand battery.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwaukee...90PC/300134851
GFOviedo is offline  
post #6 of 18 Old 03-10-2017, 08:41 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: NW Pa
Posts: 2,887
View TimPa's Photo Album My Photos
look for features you like, watching for how the saw tilts, and how it raises and lowers. those are important to be smooth and repeatable.


looks like batt models have come a looooong way. my early days dewalt 14.4 NiCad doesn't last long at all. sharp blades are critically important on that machine.
TimPa is online now  
post #7 of 18 Old 03-10-2017, 09:44 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Midwest
Posts: 1,883
View woodchux's Photo Album My Photos
Great advice from previous posts. Consider researching reviews in magazines/books/on line on circular saws - both corded & battery operated, to give you more info on what would fit your WW needs now & in the future. Compare more than just the price, as some tools may offer a "package deal" with good extras. Also, there are online info videos that show how to convert a circular saw into a TS. Be safe.
woodchux is offline  
post #8 of 18 Old 03-10-2017, 04:04 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
I like to keep my portable tools in a case. If this is something you like also, pick out a portable circular Saw with a good plastic case. I like my Makita very much. It came with two blades and a spot in the case to hold the extra blade and blade wrench.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
Toolman50 is offline  
post #9 of 18 Old 03-10-2017, 05:29 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 16
View Michael_JL's Photo Album My Photos
After continuing to read up, it's becoming clear my best bet is to save up a few moreasons weeks and get a worm drive.

I'm considering the dewalt, a makita, and a Skil. I've read the gears on the makita hypoid are more durable being hardened steel, but since there is no oil reservoir it will eventually fail. On the end, the traditional worm drive havery a reservoir, but brass gears that will eventually fail. Which is most likely to last longer?
Michael_JL is offline  
post #10 of 18 Old 03-10-2017, 06:22 PM
Senior Member
 
MT Stringer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Channelview, Tx
Posts: 2,642
View MT Stringer's Photo Album My Photos
I have the Makita 5007MG. It is a great saw. Solid frame (magnesium) and easy to handle and use. I don't thimble you would be disappointed.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Makita-15...07MG/100594811

Add The Diablo 60T blade and you will be ready to go.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Diablo-7-...760R/100627136
MT Stringer is offline  
post #11 of 18 Old 03-10-2017, 06:47 PM
Senior Member
 
firehawkmph's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Near Cleveland, Ohio
Posts: 4,992
View firehawkmph's Photo Album My Photos
Michael,
Most people don't need a sidewinder. If you are just using it occasionally, I think a normal circular saw is fine. If you're cutting a lot of heavy timber, different story. I'm a carpenter by trade and been at it for over 40 years and never bought a sidewinder. I've had a half dozen saws over the years and my favorite is my current Milwaukee. Has a solid foot, easily adjustable angle and height, and a powerful motor. They can be had on sale if you watch for $99.
Mike Hawkins
firehawkmph is online now  
post #12 of 18 Old 03-10-2017, 06:56 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,876
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
a sidewinder is the normal circ saw

Quote:
Originally Posted by firehawkmph View Post
Michael,
Most people don't need a sidewinder. If you are just using it occasionally, I think a normal circular saw is fine. If you're cutting a lot of heavy timber, different story. I'm a carpenter by trade and been at it for over 40 years and never bought a sidewinder. I've had a half dozen saws over the years and my favorite is my current Milwaukee. Has a solid foot, easily adjustable angle and height, and a powerful motor. They can be had on sale if you watch for $99.
Mike Hawkins
You may has mis-spoke when you referred to the sidewinder, and really meant worm drive? This is a sidewinder:
http://www.houzz.com/photos/78872968...aw-power-tools
firehawkmph likes this.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to woodnthings For This Useful Post:
firehawkmph (03-11-2017)
post #13 of 18 Old 03-10-2017, 10:12 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 157
View TimeTurnsElastic's Photo Album My Photos
Skil Mag77. You may not NEED a worm drive but I think that extra weight makes it easier to cut a straight line on free hand cuts. I've seen people say Skil 77s just seem to want to cut straight. There's some truth to that. The classic Skil 77 borders on too heavy, but the Mag (magnesium) 77 is just right. Most "sidewinders" feel squirrelly to me. In a way a worm drive is more forgiving because if you do get a bit off track it can still power through the cut. I have a 6 1/2" cordless Bosch that bogs down the moment you stray even a little from your line. I like cordless tools but as far as all manner of saws go they burn through batteries and the power just isn't there yet (might be less of a problem with the new DeWalt flexvolt or Milwaukee Fuels). I still think a worm drive - or as someone else mentioned, the Makita magnesium hypoid - is the way to go. It's hard to explain but something about the balance, weight and power helped correct my form and taught me to cut straight with a circular saw. Sort of.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
TimeTurnsElastic is offline  
post #14 of 18 Old 03-10-2017, 10:29 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,991
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
I needed a second saw and bought this one and I was very pleased. http://www.harborfreight.com/7-14-in...tem-63290.html
Steve Neul is offline  
post #15 of 18 Old 03-11-2017, 02:00 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 5,252
View FrankC's Photo Album My Photos
Get the saw that feels comfortable to you, the newer L-ion battery models are actually pretty good saws for occasional work, I have a Makita and rarely pick up my corded saw unless I have a lot of heavy cutting to do. Hardest thing is to get used to the blade on the right if you have used a more common left blade corded model, but they do have have advantages.
Unless you are doing construction for a living you don't need a worm drive, however if a deal comes up that is just too good to pass you will not be sorry.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

FrankC
http://sawdustmaking.com
http://woodworkerglossary.com
FrankC is online now  
post #16 of 18 Old 03-11-2017, 09:11 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Tucson Arizona
Posts: 127
View MatthewEOD's Photo Album My Photos
I have a hitachi circular saw, cosr me around $100 and is a great saw. I use it for cutting sheet goods with a homemade track I built can't complain.
MatthewEOD is offline  
post #17 of 18 Old 03-11-2017, 10:55 AM
Senior Member
 
firehawkmph's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Near Cleveland, Ohio
Posts: 4,992
View firehawkmph's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
You may has mis-spoke when you referred to the sidewinder, and really meant worm drive? This is a sidewinder:
http://www.houzz.com/photos/78872968...aw-power-tools
Thanks Woody,
I did have the terminology backwards.
Mike Hawkins
firehawkmph is online now  
post #18 of 18 Old 03-12-2017, 12:20 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Portland Oregon Metro Area
Posts: 468
View ORBlackFZ1's Photo Album My Photos
Stay away from Craftsman 20v Professional circular saw. The drill/driver was great, but the circular saw would barely last 2 minutes cutting 3/4" plywood. I also have a Craftsman circular saw which worked pretty good when it was new, but now.....

My two favorite circular saws are: Makita SP6000J1 6-1/2-Inch Plunge Circular Saw with Guide Rail https://www.amazon.com/Makita-SP6000...kita+track+saw and the Milwaukee 15 Amp 10-1/4 in. Circular Saw http://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwaukee...0-21/203400502.

The Makita is really great for indoor cuts in plywood. It has a dust collection port that works very well. The short and long guide tracks work for a 4' x 8' sheet of plywood. The cuts are splinter-less! I put the plywood on a 4' x 8' of solid foam insulation under it. I can cut plywood sheets all day in my shop without getting dust in the air. The dust port is that good. I have also used it on counter tops to cut for sink inserts.

The Milwaukee I picked up at Home Depot about two (2) years ago when the price was $199. The price has since gone to $319. (Strange....I must have got a great deal.) The main reason I got the Milwaukee was because it can cut through a 4X with one pass. I was doing some deck framing and the one pass came in very handy. I have since used it in my wood shop on 12/4 lumber. It is very messy, since it has no dust port, but it has a very clean cut even in hardwoods. It is a very heavy circular saw and I would recommend it being used only in stable situations (i.e. don't take it on the roof for cutting rafters)

Ain't technology grand........when it works.
ORBlackFZ1 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Router Table Suggestions for $300 or less? GFOviedo Power Tools & Machinery 14 03-16-2017 09:17 PM
Need shop vac hose suggestions Pirate Dust Collection 9 10-05-2016 11:22 PM
Circular saw dilemma - cheap and light vs better and heavier drabina Power Tools & Machinery 23 08-11-2016 02:34 AM
Does anyone use a large circular saw? Jig_saw General Woodworking Discussion 23 05-04-2016 03:17 AM
Partial depth cut with circular saw needmorecoffee Power Tools & Machinery 18 10-28-2015 05:55 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome