Splitter?? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 32 Old 01-05-2016, 07:24 PM
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Exactly!

I will say, based on personal experience, a kickback from a dado is startling and amazing powerful. All those teeth get a whole lot of grip on the bottom of a piece of plywood and back it comes....

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #22 of 32 Old 01-05-2016, 07:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by epicfail48 View Post
Laziness isnt a good reason to tell someone not to bother with a safety device. Splitters are mildly inconvenient, sure, but id much rather swap an insert instead of having a piece of wood launched at my crotch at orbital speeds. More importantly though, proclaiming "splitters/riving knives all suck and you shouldnt use them" is going to get some newbie killed
This post of yours was full of Failure of Epic proportions...

A splitter is NOT 'required' to prevent kickbacks.

Kindof like how training wheels are not 'required' for older kids once they have figured out how to ride their bike...

Same difference in my opinion.
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post #23 of 32 Old 01-05-2016, 07:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
I will say, based on personal experience, a kickback from a dado is startling and amazing powerful. All those teeth get a whole lot of grip on the bottom of a piece of plywood and back it comes....
Why would one even need (or want) a splitter while cutting plywood?

I thought the entire concept was that they were designed to keep hardwood from closing up behind the blade and 'pinching' it as one was cutting.

Plywood does not move like hardwood last time I checked... (no pinching)

I must have misunderstood something there.
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post #24 of 32 Old 01-05-2016, 08:02 PM
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it has 2 functions

THe first and original function is as you stated to keep the wood from pinching on the back of the rotationg blade... it keeps the kerf open.

The second function is less obvious. The plate of the splitter acts as a "third hand" to maintain the workpiece against the fence, if only by the slightest amount. If it can't walk away from the fence, it can't kickback.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #25 of 32 Old 01-05-2016, 08:13 PM
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WEll....I think a splitter is great if it makes someone feel safer but its not for everyone like myself..I guess a guard is a good idea also.
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post #26 of 32 Old 01-05-2016, 08:29 PM
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OK, then....

Quote:
Originally Posted by mat 60 View Post
WEll....I think a splitter is great if it makes someone feel safer but its not for everyone like myself..I guess a guard is a good idea also.
If a guard IS a good idea, and they are usually attached to the splitter, then you get one or the other for "free"....

like this:




or this:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 01-05-2016 at 08:32 PM.
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post #27 of 32 Old 01-05-2016, 09:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
The second function is less obvious. The plate of the splitter acts as a "third hand" to maintain the workpiece against the fence, if only by the slightest amount. If it can't walk away from the fence, it can't kickback.
You know, If you had followed my previous advice about 'personal body protection equipment' that ought to work at all times when working in the shop -

That board would have bounced right off you and been nothing more than a laughing matter.




Seriously.



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post #28 of 32 Old 01-05-2016, 09:09 PM
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I tend to follow only "good" advice...

Quote:
Originally Posted by OnealWoodworking View Post
You know, If you had followed my previous advice about 'personal body protection equipment' that ought to work at all times when working in the shop -

That board would have bounced right off you and been nothing more than a laughing matter.




Seriously.




If you keep posting those "good" ideas, the animal cruelty folks will be at your door. Seriously....
Besides, you may be looking for that particular scrap, only to find she's wearing it. .... You married? The little woman ever come into the shop without her "personal body protective shop equipment"? Never mind I can already picture it.....

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #29 of 32 Old 01-05-2016, 11:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OnealWoodworking View Post
This post of yours was full of Failure of Epic proportions...

A splitter is NOT 'required' to prevent kickbacks.

Kindof like how training wheels are not 'required' for older kids once they have figured out how to ride their bike...

Same difference in my opinion.
Not required for an experienced operator. Problem is though, an experienced operator isn't the one you have to worry about reading "safety devices are useless don't use them" and lopping a finger off.

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post #30 of 32 Old 01-06-2016, 02:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by epicfail48 View Post
Not required for an experienced operator. Problem is though, an experienced operator isn't the one you have to worry about reading "safety devices are useless don't use them" and lopping a finger off.
Agreed. While operators may not agree with safety devices, telling people the are useless and shouldn't be used is just asking for someone to get injured. Not a smart practice.

Mark

"Measuring is the enemy of accuracy." Chris Schwartz
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post #31 of 32 Old 01-06-2016, 02:47 PM
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it ain't about experience

Quote:
Originally Posted by epicfail48 View Post
Not required for an experienced operator. Problem is though, an experienced operator isn't the one you have to worry about reading "safety devices are useless don't use them" and lopping a finger off.
Saws come with splitters/riving knives because they work. They work because of the physics.

Keeping the board against the back of the fence prevents kickback. Put on your body armor and let the board come off of the fence at the rear and see what happens. Experience has nothing to do with the physics AND experienced woodworkers often take shortcuts because they have "experience" BTDT.


Keeping the kerf open is the other advantage. Put your body armor on a make a kerf part way down the board, then pinch the kerf together behind the blade and if you are lucky, and you have a saw with less than a 5 HP motor, you may be able to stall the motor in enough time to reach the OFF switch before it shoots back at you. It has nothing to do with experience and a whole lot to do with the wood movement in certain species or grain orientation .... the physics.


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #32 of 32 Old 01-06-2016, 04:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Saws come with splitters/riving knives because they work. They work because of the physics.

Keeping the board against the back of the fence prevents kickback. Put on your body armor and let the board come off of the fence at the rear and see what happens. Experience has nothing to do with the physics AND experienced woodworkers often take shortcuts because they have "experience" BTDT.


Keeping the kerf open is the other advantage. Put your body armor on a make a kerf part way down the board, then pinch the kerf together behind the blade and if you are lucky, and you have a saw with less than a 5 HP motor, you may be able to stall the motor in enough time to reach the OFF switch before it shoots back at you. It has nothing to do with experience and a whole lot to do with the wood movement in certain species or grain orientation .... the physics.

Oh, I'm not arguing that experienced operators shouldn't use a splitter or riving knife, far from it. I was just making the point that an experienced operator would A) be experienced enough to know the possible warning signs of kickback and shut everything down or B) be smart enough to ignore advise of disabling inconvenient safety mechanisms

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