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post #1 of 20 Old 04-22-2011, 12:20 AM Thread Starter
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Post Specialty Tools

Many of us have those tools that our shops thrive on. The table saw, Band saw, Routers, drill presses, and miter saws. Some of us are lucky enough to have some specialty tools like, shapers, drum sanders, and mortisers. I've been wondering..
What kind of specialty tools do you have in your shop?
Are you a professional or hobbyist woodworker?
How long have you had those tools?
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post #2 of 20 Old 04-22-2011, 05:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Locodcdude View Post
Many of us have those tools that our shops thrive on. The table saw, Band saw, Routers, drill presses, and miter saws. Some of us are lucky enough to have some specialty tools like, shapers, drum sanders, and mortisers. I've been wondering..
What kind of specialty tools do you have in your shop?
Are you a professional or hobbyist woodworker?
How long have you had those tools?
I've always been in the business end of woodworking (about 40 years). Besides those tools mentioned, moulders, stationary wet belt sander, 20" planer, 12" jointer.

Many cabinet shops are successful with pretty much the same equipment that a hobbyist would have in his garage...sometimes less.








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post #3 of 20 Old 04-22-2011, 06:07 AM
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About the only specialty tools I own is my dovetail saw! How special is that?!?

But the wisdom that is from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, and easy to be intreated, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality, and without hypocrisy. James 3:17
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post #4 of 20 Old 04-22-2011, 10:09 AM
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I have basically all the essentials, such as table saw, miter saw, jointer, drill press, wood lathe, band saws, sanders etc. I think the one specialty tool that I have would be my Excalibur 30" scroll saw. I love it. There are those that would argue that scrolling is not woodworking and doesn't require any valid skill set. I beg to differ. It depends on how far you want to take it, and after all, I'm cuttin' wood aint I?

There is a very fine line between a "hobby" and a "mental illness"
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post #5 of 20 Old 04-22-2011, 10:15 AM
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I have miter saw table saw skil saw ros sander jig saw drill impact driver and a good amount of handtools the only specilty tool I have is a 16 inch dremal scroll saw and a realy cheap dovetail saw

Lighten up . It's just the internet.
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post #6 of 20 Old 04-22-2011, 10:18 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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wet belt?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
I've always been in the business end of woodworking (about 40 years). Besides those tools mentioned, moulders, stationary wet belt sander, 20" planer, 12" jointer.

Many cabinet shops are successful with pretty much the same equipment that a hobbyist would have in his garage...sometimes less.








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What is a wet belt sander C-man? That would certainly be a specialty tool. Gotta a photo? bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #7 of 20 Old 04-22-2011, 10:40 AM
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What is a wet belt sander C-man? That would certainly be a specialty tool. Gotta a photo? bill
No photo, as I don't have it anymore, but it was a 106" wet belt sander for glass similar to this.








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post #8 of 20 Old 04-22-2011, 11:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenbo View Post
I have basically all the essentials, such as table saw, miter saw, jointer, drill press, wood lathe, band saws, sanders etc. I think the one specialty tool that I have would be my Excalibur 30" scroll saw. I love it. There are those that would argue that scrolling is not woodworking and doesn't require any valid skill set. I beg to differ. It depends on how far you want to take it, and after all, I'm cuttin' wood aint I?
How could anyone successfully argue that scroll saw work isn't woodworking?
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post #9 of 20 Old 04-22-2011, 12:01 PM
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I have a few specialty tools but that's because what I do isn't your everyday woodworking type stuff. I have the 16" makita skill saw for cutting my wood slabs or anything 6"s thick or less. I have three different size tenon cutters for my log railing. A few winches and jacks and carts to handle the big timbers I have to deal with.

Do one thing at a time, do it well, then move on.
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post #10 of 20 Old 04-22-2011, 12:02 PM Thread Starter
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Scroll sawing is most definitely woodworking, unless of course you aren't cutting wood. I've seen some really impressive scroll saw projects, they are actually really amazing.
Aside,
Soon I will hopefully be going on a tool hunt, and getting this RAS from a friend of mine. Gonna go looking for a lathe, drill press, bandsaw and Jointer. I've already got a bandsaw, but a bigger one would help for resawing :D
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post #11 of 20 Old 04-22-2011, 12:38 PM
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All tools that you make something special with are special. You look at the tools they had 200 hundred years ago and the product that they put out and it humbles you-at least it does me. My most special one would be my 50's 20 inch rockwell bandsaw. It is a beast. It will stay right where it is at because I don't think I can con my sons into helping me move it again.
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post #12 of 20 Old 04-22-2011, 12:44 PM Thread Starter
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Wow that is a very cool bandsaw, The stories it could tell.
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post #13 of 20 Old 04-22-2011, 12:48 PM
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All tools that you make something special with are special. You look at the tools they had 200 hundred years ago and the product that they put out and it humbles you-at least it does me. My most special one would be my 50's 20 inch rockwell bandsaw. It is a beast. It will stay right where it is at because I don't think I can con my sons into helping me move it again.

So true. There can be no doubt about the craftmanship and even love they put into the work they did back then. But consider this. today you can build something in much much less time than they did and with a whole lot less physical effort. That doesn't mean that the love of the work isn't there though.
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post #14 of 20 Old 04-22-2011, 01:59 PM
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Hey, Don't get me wrong, some of the things displayed on this website-I won't list any names-Too many and because I would leave some off- are built by some incredible craftsman with an obvious passion and love for the wood. They eek out of the wood pieces that show off the greatness of the resource that gives us that common bond-It is about the wood. Thoose workers 200 hundred years ago may have not had the tools but think about the quality of wood they had to work with; all old growth straight and true and stable. LOCO- Stories saw would tell in 60 years would be great. It is an amazing piece of steel from a day when we manufactured fine products. And boy does it eat wood with 13" resaw capability I have yet to bog it down.
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post #15 of 20 Old 04-22-2011, 02:55 PM
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Mike,your post is hitting pretty close to a bullseye as far as I'm concerned(wood quality).We go to efforts that those in the past didn't have to deal with.Just sayin........

I will never forget doin a hist preservation(National register)house where the late 18th cent dado section was something like 27? inches wide and was cut out of a single log.Big fat base and a very nice cap rail....it was slackjaw cool.Runnin big-azz moulding planes nowadays seems like sooooo much work,and it is.But when you factor in spot-on perfect grain structure and a work atmosphere that modern day craftsman can only dream about...well,it just wasn't that hard.

Somewhere about 1835'ish?is when "old school" fell by the wayside.Water pwr came into vogue.....and mass produced "industrial age" products took hold.Here in the U.S. that also was when RR's really got cranked up.So now getting products,"out there" wasn't at issue anymore.Its very evident when you start scratchin under the surface in old house/building and furniture world.To the point....that the more a person is around THAT specific time period the more it becomes glaringly apparent....again,just sayin.Nice post,BW
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post #16 of 20 Old 04-22-2011, 03:15 PM
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Oh,and to the OP.........I found a blacksmith produced set of tongs(benders)probably made right around 1800,buried in a waste pile.And happily they've been utilized doing standing seam "Terne" metal roofing for us.Hey,thats what they were made for?Why not use them as intended.Too lazy to go measure but they're probably 'round 18" wide.BW
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post #17 of 20 Old 04-22-2011, 03:37 PM
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My specialist tool is a tube bender that I used once 20 years ago to replace the front break lines of my car.
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post #18 of 20 Old 04-22-2011, 03:55 PM
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BW, I was a plastering contractor for 25 years. Thus I got a free tour of some of the finest old and new houses in the inland pacific North west. To be able to look inside how things used to be built was like a peek back in time. We transfered some of the old into the new with colored plasters. Pretty spendy though-we did not stop useing plaster because it was inferior-drywall was just a lot cheaper. Could not do shapes in picture though.
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post #19 of 20 Old 04-23-2011, 08:47 AM
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Its been a few years since I did any real plaster work.All our church plasterwork was done by this dear dear friend of mine.He was an old man then.......saw him a few years ago and he hadn't aged a bit.Must be over 100,haha.Anyhow I'd build the forms/bucks for these HUGE church cornices,amongst other stuff......and Robert and his crew would plaster them.I'd sit way up there on scaffolding(mucho one-offs here)and ask all kinds of questions,and in general marvel at his craftsmanship....finely honed in the biz for so many years.

So,had a leg up in old house world.When repairing plaster was on the menu,I'd do it.This would be original 18th century,hog's hair on wood lathe.And got pretty darn good at it.....but the time spent watching and asking questions is what made the difference.Even though I've scalded hair off hog's its nasty.....we'd always go snag a horse hair broom and utilize that into the first coat.

As a trivia question,I like to ask budding drywall contractors where the term "drywall" came from.You know,like whats a bucket of water got to do with plaster in a dumbazz sort of tone?And then gage their response.BW
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post #20 of 20 Old 04-23-2011, 09:19 AM
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As a trivia question,I like to ask budding drywall contractors where the term "drywall" came from.You know,like whats a bucket of water got to do with plaster in a dumbazz sort of tone?And then gage their response.BW
I'm surprised you don't know. Actually I think you do know and you are just funnin' us. Drywall is called that cause it goes up dry...unlike lathe and plaster.








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