Smallest motorized saw for straight cuts? - Page 3 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #41 of 52 Old 02-07-2017, 11:03 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks!

'Nother question: if the Kreg Jig requires the use of clamps to hold down the pieces while I drive the screws into them, then, well, I still need a clamp (or a few)?
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post #42 of 52 Old 02-07-2017, 11:43 AM
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Thanks!

'Nother question: if the Kreg Jig requires the use of clamps to hold down the pieces while I drive the screws into them, then, well, I still need a clamp (or a few)?
It is about next to impossible to do any woodworking without some kind of clamps. :smile3:
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post #43 of 52 Old 02-07-2017, 12:17 PM Thread Starter
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It is about next to impossible to do any woodworking without some kind of clamps. :smile3:
Is it possible to make do with just one steel clamp? I ordered 4 cheap plastic ones on eBay, dunno if they can actually hold anything.
Or maybe I should opt for the Kreg device that has its own clamp, looks easier to use.
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post #44 of 52 Old 02-07-2017, 01:15 PM
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Is it possible to make do with just one steel clamp? I ordered 4 cheap plastic ones on eBay, dunno if they can actually hold anything.
Or maybe I should opt for the Kreg device that has its own clamp, looks easier to use.
I think you may be getting Kreg clamps, Kreg tools and the Kreg jig confused. Search You Tube and you should find many examples of the Kreg tools being demonstrated.

The Kreg pocket hole jig is simply a tool that allows you to drill a pocket hole in the work piece so it will accept the washer head screws. If you see a clamp on this particular jig, it's sole purpose is to hold the work piece in place while the pocket hole is being drilled.

I have the K4 model, and the single hole model and the two hole model. They all get used at one time or another.

Good luck. Do some research and pay attention to the types of clamps that are being used.

BTW, You can never have too many clamps.
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post #45 of 52 Old 02-07-2017, 02:05 PM Thread Starter
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I didn't really get them confused. I understand that a clamp is needed to hold the device while I drill the holes.
It looks like a neat way of doing things, cheaper than owning a dozen clamps (which are very expensive to buy locally or ship internationally).

I will be using MDF for the speaker cabinets and I will definitely use wood glue. My question is: can I use, say, 4 pocket screws to hold together two pieces of wood tight until the glue dries, and then unscrew the screws and re-use them for the next joint? Or do I need to buy tons of pocket screws?

If it's possible, then it means I can just buy a 5 GBP clamp + a Kreg R3 and be done with it, as far as joinery is concerned.

Otherwise, I'll go with the strap clamps, but then I'd have to join all pieces of the cabinet for these straps to work, right?

Last edited by Yonathan; 02-07-2017 at 02:07 PM.
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post #46 of 52 Old 02-09-2017, 07:05 AM
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The tried and true clamping techniques are the best. Do you have access to clamps like this

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Pony-Adju...Q&gclsrc=aw.ds

that screw on to pipe? The metric pipe thread is different from American threads, but maybe there are metric equivalents available to you from Europe.

Or, you could get a US pipe thread die

https://www.amazon.com/Irwin-Tools-7.../dp/B0195UX8RW

and thread locally sourced metric pipe. It looks like metric DN15 pipe has the same outside diameter as US 1/2 in. pipe.

https://www.saylor.org/site/wp-conte...E303-4.1.1.pdf
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post #47 of 52 Old 02-09-2017, 07:19 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by ducbsa View Post
The tried and true clamping techniques are the best. Do you have access to clamps like this

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Pony-Adju...Q&gclsrc=aw.ds

that screw on to pipe? The metric pipe thread is different from American threads, but maybe there are metric equivalents available to you from Europe.

Or, you could get a US pipe thread die

https://www.amazon.com/Irwin-Tools-7.../dp/B0195UX8RW

and thread locally sourced metric pipe. It looks like metric DN15 pipe has the same outside diameter as US 1/2 in. pipe.

https://www.saylor.org/site/wp-conte...E303-4.1.1.pdf
Never seen this time of clamps before. Why these and not regular wood clamps?
I already ordered the strap clamps, but am just curious.
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post #48 of 52 Old 02-09-2017, 10:31 AM
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I think a table saw is the only way to go, especially for cutting smaller pieces.
If you are only cutting 3/4" stock, you could get by with a cheap (about $100 new) table saw.
A circular saw and a home made guide, would be fine for longer cuts on wider pieces.
I have a cabinet saw, but at a garage sale, picked up a cheapo Ryobi, "table saw for $10 and use it when out of shop and need a table saw.
Setting the fence takes a few seconds, but it would be much easier then using a hand held saw for accurate cuts.

When living on my sailboat, I made a "table" saw, from plastic milk crate, with a board on top, with circular saw bolted below. A routed groove for a miter gauge, and a straight piece of wood to clamp on as a fence.
If you expect to be ripping certain sizes again and again, I would save a sample piece, of each size. Then next time, lay the sample against the blade, and place wood fence against it, and clamp down. Before clamping rear of fence, move it just a hair away from the blade to prevent pinching and burning.

I thing any kind of "table" saw would be much better than a hand held saw, especially cutting short pieces.
Blade Runner? Jig saw mounted under board. Much too much blade flex for great cuts. If you think you want one, why not buy a decent jig saw, and bolt under a piece of wood, and if needed can be used with out being mounted. But it won't get the quality of cut you need.

For wide pieces a hand held circular saw will work fine.
From what I have seen a Blade Runner is a jig saw mounted under a table. Very easy to make. But not something you would want to make perfect straight cuts with.

Let us know what you decide on and how it is working out.
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post #49 of 52 Old 02-09-2017, 11:29 AM
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Never seen this time of clamps before. Why these and not regular wood clamps?
I already ordered the strap clamps, but am just curious.
They might be cheaper than a bar clamp.

Especially while using a strap clamp, find a way to hold the sides square to each other, like these http://www.rockler.com/clamp-it-assembly-square See the images that show how they are used.

I made my own from 3/4" plywood, but I have a table saw to make the cuts. Maybe learning to use a handsaw (a definite skill that I don't really have), like was done before power saws were even available, would enable you to have success.

www.rockler.com has a lot of handy jigs, tools, etc. that make the work go easier and many of them can be made by the woodworker himself.
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post #50 of 52 Old 02-09-2017, 01:51 PM Thread Starter
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They might be cheaper than a bar clamp.

Especially while using a strap clamp, find a way to hold the sides square to each other, like these http://www.rockler.com/clamp-it-assembly-square See the images that show how they are used.

I made my own from 3/4" plywood, but I have a table saw to make the cuts. Maybe learning to use a handsaw (a definite skill that I don't really have), like was done before power saws were even available, would enable you to have success.

www.rockler.com has a lot of handy jigs, tools, etc. that make the work go easier and many of them can be made by the woodworker himself.
I didn't buy a ratchet clamp, but something a bit different that's actually meant for the job for which I need it:


Notice the 90 degree plastic pieces.

Regarding table saws - two problems:
1. They're more expensive than decent circular saws or even an entry level track saw, and
2. They require permanent placements. I had my eyes on the "jigsaw table" because it's portable so I could simply store it on top of my bedroom closet when it's not in use. But yeah, I no longer consider getting it because many reviews mentioned its inaccuracy.
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post #51 of 52 Old 02-10-2017, 08:46 AM
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The 90 deg pieces will help, but use something with a right angle and longer sides on the inside of the box to check it and push the box more square right after clamping before the glue dries. Another technique is to measure the diagonal distances and push the box to make them equal.
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post #52 of 52 Old 02-10-2017, 09:33 AM Thread Starter
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The 90 deg pieces will help, but use something with a right angle and longer sides on the inside of the box to check it and push the box more square right after clamping before the glue dries. Another technique is to measure the diagonal distances and push the box to make them equal.
Thanks, I'll keep these suggestions in mind.
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