Set screws have damaged tilt & lift screws - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 04-28-2020, 02:43 PM Thread Starter
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Question Set screws have damaged tilt & lift screws

I just purchased an older Craftsman 113.29960 contractor table saw. I needed to upgrade from a benchtop table saw in order to get more consistent & accurate cuts as my carpentry side-job has grown. I am replacing some older parts that have worn out (pulleys & belt) but everything else is in great shape. However, the ends of the tilt screw and lifts screw have been stripped by the set screws within the hand wheels (pictures below). I have found that after the hand wheels are tightened via set screw onto the tilt and lift screws they simply spin without moving the tilt/lift screws. I'd love to not have to purchase a new tilt/lift screw simply because of some scarring on the ends. Does anyone know of any remedies that would help me avoid replacing them all together?

Thank you!
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post #2 of 12 Old 04-28-2020, 03:06 PM
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Drill a bevel in the location where the mark is on the shaft that the set screw goes into. Don't drill a hole...just the bevel portion of the drill bit. Put the handle back on and set the screw so it locates into that bevel.

Gary

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post #3 of 12 Old 04-28-2020, 03:13 PM
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set screws rely on the "flat" of the shaft to resist rotation.
I'd take a metal file and clean up the flats on the shafts, also clean up any metal ridges on the circumference.
there's no magic to how "deep" the flat is - so taking "too much" off the previous flat dimension (within reason...) isn't an issue.

then check and see how tightly/snugly the wheels fit onto the shaft. if they're super sloppy, the bore may have been gouged out beyond salvageable...
mucked up steel shaft, aluminum wheel - the aluminum loses every time.....



get some appropriate size set screws with a "cup" end - and some Locktite removal strength "Blue"
install the cup set screws a tightly as possible. if they "move" / wiggle on cranking, you need new crank wheels.
any slight motion/slop on cranking will eventually reproduce the problem pictured.
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post #4 of 12 Old 04-28-2020, 06:34 PM
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Most set screws have a cup on the end that digs into the shaft, you will likely need to replace the originals to get them to hold, simple fix for less than cup of coffee.

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post #5 of 12 Old 04-28-2020, 07:10 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Fix it correctly .....

Because I can weld and braze, i would remove the screws and braze on some 1/2" sleeves with holes for the existing shafts which are so buggered up that they are almost useless. The hand wheels are probably in worse shape? Hand wheels come in various internal shaft sizes and 1/2" would be a common size. A machine shop could do this very quickly and at a reasonable cost IF you bring in the screws to get an estimate.

I don't know why Sears/Craftsman/Emerson reduced the size of the shafts on those saws only to rely on a smaller set screw for the means to secure them, it makes no sens to me. Ebay has handwheels in all shaft sizes:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Craftsman-C...ty!48370!US!-1


https://www.ebay.com/itm/Sears-Craft...MAAOSwsW9Y1Veh

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #6 of 12 Old 04-28-2020, 10:56 PM Thread Starter
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@TomCT2 When referring to the "flats" of the shaft, are you talking about these parts?
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post #7 of 12 Old 04-29-2020, 08:11 AM
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wow - that is in pretty bad shape. (but is not out of the normal)
you need to take a good metal file to the shaft and clean up
all that mangled metal to where the pulley or handwheel
slips on and off without hanging up.
("an older Craftsman" sort of explains everything).

Set screws have damaged tilt &amp; lift screws-screen-shot-2020-04-28-9.39.50-pm.png

.

there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks.

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post #8 of 12 Old 04-29-2020, 10:16 AM
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I had a shaft that was very much like that. Even though the hole in the hand wheel wasn't worn so badly it needed replacement, the shaft was so badly damaged it wouldn't fit well.

My last resort was to weld material to the shaft and then file it back down until it fit snugly into the hand wheel. It did take a lot of time and energy to file it back down but the end result was worth it.
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post #9 of 12 Old 04-29-2020, 11:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kraig Mewbourne View Post
@TomCT2 When referring to the "flats" of the shaft, are you talking about these parts?

yes - that's 'the flat'
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post #10 of 12 Old 04-29-2020, 11:49 AM
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Something doesn't make sense there.

Even as badly as it is scored if the handle fit on and the set screw tightened onto the flat it should not turn.

Question 1: does the handle fit onto the shaft far enough for the set screw to tighten onto the flat section? If the handle doesn't go on far enough the set screw will tighten onto the end where it is round and it could spin. Take the set screw out of the handle, paint the flat portion of the shaft white (white out or correction tape is handy for this) put the handle on and shine your flashlight into the hole. Can you see white?

Question 2: does the set screw go all the way in? If it stops before it hits the shaft it obviously won't work. With the handle off the saw can you tighten the set screw all the way into the inside so that you can see 1/4"-3/8" when you look into the inside of the handle? If not take the set screw out, run a tap through the threads to clean things up and then try again. Get a new set screw if you must, they are sometimes called "grub screws" and can be found in the metal sorting bins in the bolt aisle of the hardware store.

Put the handle on and tighten the set screw then loosen it and remove the handle and look at the flat section, did the set screw make a mark in the paint on the flat section?

How about pictures of the handles?
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post #11 of 12 Old 04-29-2020, 02:13 PM Thread Starter
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Well, for starters I realized that the hand wheel was not getting far enough onto the tilt screw for the set screw to rest on the flat section. That will be remedied immediately.

Also, I ordered a new hand wheel for the tilt screw as it was pretty mangled up. As well, I ordered new cup set screws and Locktite blue to put them on with. I will do some filing on the flats and clean up the rest of the shaft. Between that and the new set screws I am hoping that will fix the problem. I'll reply back with the verdict!

I sure do appreciate all of the help! I have been doing rough carpentry for years (mostly as a side job, I am primarily a school teacher) but have recently devoted (perhaps been converted) more time to true woodworking. I look forward to coming by here more often to gain from this wealth of knowledge. Again, thank you!
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post #12 of 12 Old 04-29-2020, 03:52 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Something is not right here ....




There has been some 'redneck engineering" on the tilt mechanism. There's a wood plate that spaces the support bracket back inside about 1/4" for some reason. The washers and bolts are not original either. This prevents your crank handle from going al the way on, so that's why your set screws are not seating on the flat. Fix that issue or it will always chase you around....

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 04-29-2020 at 03:54 PM.
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