Sears Craftsman 10 inch radial saw - Page 3 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #41 of 81 Old 04-14-2011, 01:58 PM
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I have the same saw as the original poster. I inherited it but haven't used it yet. Received the kit and stated installing it and realized that the arm seems to be stuck. It won't move left or right at all.

How do I go about fixing this? I'm missing the angle scale and indicator on top of the saw. Do I have to worry about screwing up the calibration?
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post #42 of 81 Old 04-14-2011, 05:00 PM
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Radial Arm Stuck

How rusty ie the upright tube. Mine was hard to move. I spraye it with WD-40 and slowly worked it loose.



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Originally Posted by unknownsoldierx View Post
I have the same saw as the original poster. I inherited it but haven't used it yet. Received the kit and stated installing it and realized that the arm seems to be stuck. It won't move left or right at all.

How do I go about fixing this? I'm missing the angle scale and indicator on top of the saw. Do I have to worry about screwing up the calibration?
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post #43 of 81 Old 04-14-2011, 06:53 PM
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It's not really rusty at all. It's pretty dusty and dirty and in need of a cleaning. I'd like to take it apart to clean and oil the tube and the big screw that raises the tube. I just want to make sure I can do it without messing everything up.
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post #44 of 81 Old 04-14-2011, 08:49 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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arm stuck?

The arm swings in an arc from the top of the post. There are 2 means of releasing these:
The older style is a 4" knob that tightens the lever after the pin seats in the hole. After unscrewing the knob, you pull back on the lever to release the pin.

The other is a lever on the top which is also pulled toward the operator to release the pin similar to the one in the photo, the newer style.

The pin may be just stuck in it's hole. Wiggle the arm left to right without straining it while pulling on the release lever to see if that helps release the pin. It's just that simple. bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #45 of 81 Old 04-14-2011, 09:06 PM
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I have the new style with the lever on top. I've removed the top cover and there is a rod attached to the lever that gets driven into the post, with a piece of metal in between the rod and the post. The lever is in the unlocked position and the metal piece flaps back and forth freely.

Maybe I need to loosen the bolts on the back of the arm?

Also, I'd like to take the post completely apart and grease/oil everything so the post and arm move smoother. Can I do this without screwing up alignment or anything else?

Last edited by unknownsoldierx; 04-14-2011 at 09:09 PM.
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post #46 of 81 Old 04-14-2011, 09:10 PM
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I may be getting a craftsman Radial Arm Saw from a buddy of mine, he said it just needs a new cord, but we'll see. What ever it's like, it's gotta be worth it :D
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post #47 of 81 Old 04-14-2011, 09:11 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Nope

Quote: Maybe I need to loosen the bolts on the back of the arm?

That column doesn't rotate.
The arm rotates on the top of the column.
If you have PB Blaster or Liquid Wrench blast the pin and the gap
between the head and the column with the cap off. The pin should be hooked to the rod, not loose, if not that's your issue.
Check that out. bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #48 of 81 Old 04-15-2011, 12:16 AM
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The column doesn't rotate, but it does go up and down to raise the arm. Eventually I want to get it cleaned up and oiled, along with the crank assembly so it moves a little easier. But that's a separate issue.

I was a little confused how the arm lock worked. I thought this part was what locked it in place:



Anyways, I just realized I can pull the lever much farther with the top cover off. The arm swings pretty nicely now.

Now I know why the top cover is torn up by the slit the lever protrudes from. The lever has to travel too far to allow the arm to move. I pull the lever back until it clicks into the unlock position, then I have to pull it back much farther and hold it while I swing the arm. I've adjusted the lever as tight as it can go but it still hits the cover when I pull in order to move the arm.

Am I correct in assuming the arm should swing without me holding the lever back to the (indexing position?)

Also, after this I will be installing the safety kit. I don't have the arbor wrench that came with the saw. I have another arbor wrench with a thickness a hair under 1/4 inch. Will that work for setting the height of the table support bars?

Last edited by unknownsoldierx; 04-15-2011 at 01:26 AM.
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post #49 of 81 Old 04-15-2011, 01:54 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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Any flat piece of material will work, 1/8" to 1/4" thick. Better yet, 2 pieces, one on each side. I've never found the need to precisely set the table height, in fact my table sits right on the frame. My saw is only used for 90 degree crosscuts however, so if you are going to miter with it, it will matter more. I also use a large one piece table with a screw down fence, rather than the 3 piece that comes with it. bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #50 of 81 Old 06-27-2012, 10:43 AM
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RecklessOne,

I own that saw and have used it off and on for over thirty years. Until this month the only work it needed was a deck replacement and some squaring adjustments. Unfortunately, during a recent rip the motor overheated and the reset didn't work. I think I have burned out the control block on the motor, but haven't found information needed to test that theory. If you come across part or information sources for this machine, I would appreciate your sharing.

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post #51 of 81 Old 06-27-2012, 10:53 AM
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I'm interested in the safety upgrade.

I recently overheated mine and am looking for instructions about how to test the motor components to determine what needs replacing.

The comment about pushing not pulling the blade impressed me. Do you concur with the advice?

Thanks for your time.

magi
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post #52 of 81 Old 06-27-2012, 12:04 PM
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Pull it

The owner's manual and common sense says pulling the saw into the work is safest, since you can "resist" the tendency for the saw to climb onto the work.
Also the teeth on the blade are turning upward from the operator to the fence, thereby lifting the work off the table. If you start out lifting the work then you have a problem. By pulling it into the work gradually the teeth have already made a kerf and there is much less tendency for the work to lift.

The overheated motor may just need the red reset button pushed until you hear a click. Just slight pressure should do it.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #53 of 81 Old 06-27-2012, 02:53 PM
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Thanks for the heads up guys, after reading this post, I just ordered one for my Craftsman too

I have a fever, and the only perscription is, more COWBELL!
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post #54 of 81 Old 12-12-2012, 05:51 PM
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Wink Craftsman 10" Radial Arm Saw

Hey Fellas,

This has been a fantastic wealth of knowledge and tips for me. So, thank you!

I was gifted a Craftsman 10" RAS in late summer from my Father-In-Law (FIL)! I'm pretty sure it is the exact model as was the start of this thread. So I naturally started Googling it to find out more about it. It turns out I have the 3rd owner I think and my FIL kept all the documentation so I have the original owners manual, wrenches, parts, etc. Sick!

When I read on here and other places online about the safety recall and the free blade guard kit I was stoked. I immediately ordered it. I just didn't realize that it came with the blade guard AND a totally new table top and fence!? WHAT!? Awesome ... too bad I had JUST finished building my own brand new table top & fence out of 3/4" MDF. Mine is better : )

TABLE TOP

The previous table top my FIL had on there was a 1" particle board base with 1/4" plywood "scrap" top. The problem there was that where he had cut into and through the 1/4" top it had warped, bowed, and popped up making it really hard, annoying, and potentially dangerous to try and rip anything on that surface, or to keep any workpiece flat while cutting.



I built my RAS table top out of 3/4" MDF for the base. Then I put another layer of 3/4" MDF on top of that (totaling 1.5") for a "scrap" layer to cut into. This top layer gets bolted on at the four corners and two in the middle (I countersunk the bolts obviously). This allows me to have a perfectly smooth top layer that will never warp, bend, pop up, or splinter (much) even if I cut deep into it since MDF is super stable. The added thickness is also nice for a heavy, sturdy, stable table top.



BLADE GUARDS

The old blade guard didn't have all the new safety features (obviously), but it did work pretty well as long as you respected the saw, its capabilities, and practiced common sense safety per the operators manual. I did several crosscuts with it to build my MDF tabletop as well as used it to rip MDF. The ripping can be safe as long as you use the anti-kickback pawls as instructed and lower the front of the blade guard down to almost touching the workpiece's top surface (keeping it from lifting up and from kicking back, this also keeps some sawdust out of your face).

I know what Reckless was talking about with the old blade guard shooting right in your face. The dust shoot used to have a 90˚ elbow on it but that was long gone on mine and his it seems. But having the dust shoot out the front makes zero sense anyway. Glad they fixed that with the new blade guard (has it coming out the back/top with a 90˚ elbow included).

The new blade guard works great. It includes the new handle operated lift guard as well as a riving knife! Ripping is really nice on this RAS with this new setup.



THE RIVING KNIFE

QUESTION: Has anyone had trouble with their new blade guard riving knife/anti-kickback pawls coming loose from the blade guard housing? There are 2 connection points for the riving knife/anti-kickback pawls to the larger blade guard housing. Recently I had the nut come off the bolt on the lower connection point WHILE I WAS USING THE SAW for crosscutting. YIKES! POW! It flew (thankfully) out the BACK of the saw hitting the wall. I immediately powered down and replaced the nut and cranked it down!

BUT the other connection point (where the red tension knob secures the riving knife/anti-kickback pawls after adjusting their height) can only be adjusted (it seems) from the underside of the blade guard (aka you have to take it off the saw to see it) is also loose ... BUT I don't think there is a nut on that side. Is there at nut on anyone elses? It seems that there are just a couple of lock washers on mine?! Anyone able to shed some light on this for me? Is there anyway to tighten it down? I tighten the red tension knob (depth setting knob) down as hard as I dare and the whole thing is still loose.

The problem with all of this is relatively minor (I think), but annoying, and slightly dangerous (so maybe NOT so minor?). The anti-kickback pawls work great regardless, but it is the riving knife that won't operate properly.

I followed the instructions for aligning and setting up the riving knife properly with the fence. But every time that I put a workpiece through it while ripping, it gets to the riving knife but stops because the riving knife isn't in line with the blade. So I have to reach around (I know this is a safety no no) to the other side of the enclosed blade guard and bump the riving knife into the kerf slot so that it will work properly. Then it is fine for the rest of that cut (obviously). But this is obviously a MAJOR annoyance and not very safe. That is why I bring up the looseness as an issue. I have tried to realign the riving knife with the fence, but with the same result. I'm convinced the looseness is the issue.

Other than THAT, the new blade guard kit is sweet!

QUESTIONS: Blade choice for the RAS

1. What is a negative hook blade?
1B. Do I HAVE to use a negative hook blade in my RAS? Or can I get away with using one that isn't?

2. What is the BEST ALL AROUND blade for crosscutting AND ripping in my RAS? 28T? 30T? 40T? Think, "1 blade does it all".
2A. Any brands you would recommend? (keep in mind I'm poor/cheap)
2B. Or do I need more than 1 blade to REALLY do it right?
2C. Do I need a special blade for hardwoods?

3. Can I get carbide blades resharpened?
3A. If so, how much would it cost to resharpen a standard carbide blade?
3B. AKA, is it worth it? Or should I just buy a new blade (depending on the quality I purchase)?

4. What could be causing wavy lines in my crosscuts? (see photo)
4A. Pulling the saw through too slow? Too fast?
4B. Warped blade? (the blade isn't missing any teeth, and it is tight on the spindle)
4C. Old blade? Just needs to be replaced? (I am using the old 28T standard carbide blade that it came with from my FIL, no telling how OLD it is ...)



DUST COLLECTION: QUESTION:

Any recommendations for a good (read affordable and reliable) system to hook up to the RAS for dust collection? (i.e. shop vac?)

WEIGHING IN ON THE DEBATES

Per Ripping with the RAS:

I don't have a problem with it. It works great. You just have to ALWAYS use the blade guard as it is intended, use the riving knife, anti-kickback pawls, and lower the front of the guard to almost the top of the workpiece. Follow the users manual instructions on that and you shouldn't have trouble ripping with it!

I don't have a table saw :( So ... I have to rip with my RAS. IF I DID have a TS I would naturally just dedicate my RAS to crosscuts.

Pushing vs. Pulling Crosscuts:

I'm a newbie, but the instruction manual says pull. So I only pull, and it feels very safe and comfortable. I only get in trouble when I impatiently want to pull the saw TOO quickly through the workpiece and it runs toward me real fast as it eats through the wood (and usually stalls or bogs down the motor). As long as I have a firm, concentrated, and patient grip then I can cut straight and steadily through any work piece up to 4" thick (tall). The key is to go SLOWER as the piece gets thicker or more dense. Just do it by feel erring on SLOW.

The blade force at work when you pull, since the blade is rotating clockwise (from the guard side), is down into the work piece and thus down into the table and against the fence. As you pull further through the piece and the backside of the blade is engaged with the workpiece it begins to switch and the force of the blade is up off the table. All that to say you should always keep a firm hold on your workpiece for the ENTIRE duration of the crosscut.

I love my RAS and I can't wait to build more stuff with it!

Last edited by RASMAK; 12-12-2012 at 06:23 PM. Reason: Needed to figure out how to add photos.
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post #55 of 81 Old 12-12-2012, 07:17 PM
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Its running out toward you when you pull, because you don't have a negative hook blade. Get the right blade......that will be greatly reduced/eliminated.

You really need two blades.....a low tooth count ripping blade...and a higher tooth count crosscut blade.
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post #56 of 81 Old 12-12-2012, 07:31 PM
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Look on eBay for Onsrud miter saw blades. Excellent value. Search the forum and you will see many of us have them.
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post #57 of 81 Old 12-13-2012, 08:15 PM
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The blade is on backwards !

Turn the blade around with the teeth facing the fence from the foward position. The way it's mounted on the arbor in the photo, you will throw the board you are cutting in your face. RAS demand respect or they will bite you. Never push cut into your wood to cross cut it either.

Note: I see you have the blade on correct in the last photos, where as it was wrong in the first set. Someone else has the blade backwards too - Think it was Mort Tenon

Last edited by Woodbore; 12-13-2012 at 08:28 PM. Reason: seen newer photos
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post #58 of 81 Old 12-13-2012, 10:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodbore View Post
Turn the blade around with the teeth facing the fence from the foward position. The way it's mounted on the arbor in the photo, you will throw the board you are cutting in your face. RAS demand respect or they will bite you. Never push cut into your wood to cross cut it either.

Note: I see you have the blade on correct in the last photos, where as it was wrong in the first set. Someone else has the blade backwards too - Think it was Mort Tenon
I disagree with a blade being backwards, throwing the board in your face.
It just won't cut very good, if at all. If the motor was running in reverse, it would throw the wood at you.

I do agree with, not pushing the blade into the wood, as it would try to lift the wood. Not sure where this idea came from. Maybe from someone with a scms, where this is the norm.
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post #59 of 81 Old 12-18-2012, 10:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan50hrl
Its running out toward you when you pull, because you don't have a negative hook blade. Get the right blade......that will be greatly reduced/eliminated.

You really need two blades.....a low tooth count ripping blade...and a higher tooth count crosscut blade.
The only reason negative hook blades exist, it seems from what I read, is for safety on 2 similar tools in particular, the RAS and the sliding miter saw. Correct? Is there any other reason that you would want a negative hook blade, other than for safety on the tools I just mentioned? (For safety because they can move toward the operator quickly being that they slide.)

I have been unknowingly using a positive hook (24T ripping/framing) blade on my radial arm saw since I got it back in August. I have not been concerned or afraid at any point in using it whether for ripping or cross cutting. It seems that using a negative hook blade is an added (optional) safety measure rather than a necessity, and only for cross cutting (NOT for ripping).

Since the RAS does both ripping and cross cutting, and one can switch back and forth between the two relatively quickly, I plan to get a standard positive hook 40T decent quality blade for all ripping and cross cutting. Unless someone can convince me otherwise?

Last edited by RASMAK; 12-18-2012 at 10:54 AM.
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post #60 of 81 Old 12-18-2012, 01:27 PM
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Well here's the thing, a 40 tooth blade is really too many for ripping effectively, and a 40 tooth blade is really not enough for cross cutting effectively. So in my opinion, get a regular ripping blade somewhere in that area of 24 to 30 teeth. And then a negative hook blade for crosscutting

The tools don't make the craftsman....
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