Sears Craftsman 10 inch radial saw - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 81 Old 10-14-2008, 12:02 AM
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My first shop was my dorm room while I was in the USAF from 1977 -1981. It had 3 closet doors on one wall. The center door hid my brand new Sears Craftsman Radial Arm saw. The saw hinged down then rested on a little interlocking saw horse. I made some basic tables and stuff in that room before I realized the concept of dust collection had escaped me. I found a new place for it when I noticed I was making more dust and noise than friends.
My saw was an exact match to yours and I think I bought it in 79 for $300.
It was a good saw and I had alot of fun with it.
Keeping it in tune was a constant chore. The climb cut safety issue raised above is real. The real danger is when cross cutting soft and thin material. As you pull the saw to you the blade wants to walk up on top of the material. It catches and runs forward. The thinner and softer the material the easier the teeth can puncture through and continue forward. Thats why you are being warned to "push" as you cut. You have to pull a little and be ready to push back a lot. The "3" horse motor just is not quite enough for alot of things you are going to try. Everytime the saw runs up on a peice of stock you will have to go through the tuning sequence. Not too much to worry about but something that deserves respect.
Ripping with this saw should really be avoided in my opinion. The worst kick back of my career was ripping with a moulding head cutter exactly like was described above. The cutter had 3 teeth the board was 4 feet long and the cutter caught the piece 6 times and the saw did not lose much rpm's while it shot that thing faster than I care to figure. I too quit for the day.
Unless there is some new conventional wisdom that has escaped me, You have the blade in that saw backwards. That will be pushing the board up instead of down. That must be why you said something about the dust coming right in your face. With a fresh spoils board on your top with a single kerf in it, the downward cutting action will give you a clean cut top and bottom. Cutting up,as you have the blade, will tear out at the top a little with the best of blade. And I'm pretty sure would be a bigger safty issue than the climb cut.

Congradulations on your new saw. It will satisfy your passion if you give it the tlc needs.
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post #22 of 81 Old 10-14-2008, 10:18 AM
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That new blade guard looks real good Reckless. I tried to order one for mine, but the recall site doesn't recognise my model number.
Looking at your pictures I think you may have the blade on backwards.

Gerry
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post #23 of 81 Old 10-14-2008, 10:55 AM
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1980? Thats almost new, my four Craftsman saw
are all over forty and one is fifty years old.

Looking good!

All of mine have built a sailboat or two in their time.

Last edited by BHOFM; 11-18-2008 at 09:46 AM.
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post #24 of 81 Old 10-14-2008, 11:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRecklessOne View Post
Here are some pics of the new guard and table


You definitely have the blade on backwards. The climb cut problem IMO, is an operator control problem, and possibly an improper blade. Learning the feed in rate and rate of movement lessens if not eliminates the upward tendency. If there is an indication of any upward pressure, slow down the feed. The exact same thing can happen on a table saw if material is pushed too fast into the blade and not held down. Patience is the key.






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post #25 of 81 Old 10-14-2008, 06:14 PM Thread Starter
 
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Thanks guys! I knew as soon as put up the pics that the blade was on backward. I put it on there without much thought in an effort to tune and align the saw. I don't plan on using this framing blade anyway. It was just in the passenger seat of my truck for my miter saw. I'm actually considering the Avanti crosscut blade by freud because its on clearance at Lowe's.

I figure I'll put a 1/4" sacrificial top on it inside of damaging the brand new mdf top. I'll pick up the new blade when I pick up more sheet goods
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post #26 of 81 Old 10-15-2008, 09:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
I use a RAS almost daily and can say that the saw cannot climb over the board and come at you. The motor/saw assembly is a fixed distance between the table and the arm, and does not move up and over a board when cutting. If it does that more than one attachment point is loose or not connected, and in that case the saw should not be used anyway. A dull blade, or pulling too fast may cause some resistance which may put an upward pressure on the motor, but in no way will it climb over a board.

What is important is to have a properly set up saw, use an appropriate blade (negative hook), and it being sharp, and feeding into the cut slowly, and use a slow smooth pull.

A push type cutting procedure requires pulling out the saw, setting up the subject piece, and then doing a push cut. I find counteracting the resistance is easier on a pull cut. If a board is wide, there may not be enough room to pull out the saw to start in front of the work.

Getting to know the feel of any tool and its limits may come with their use, and hopefully add to operator safety.

Once again Cabinetman is right. While I have lived in the USA for all my life and my family has been here for 300 years, I still have a problem with translation. My saw is bolted tight and is solid as a rock. The blade doesn't come over the wood and at me is I typed it may. It will make you think that with the wrong blade on it and pulling it to fast. I think my piont I was trying to make was it is better to push than pull the saw motor. The first time it happend to me, it felt like it was going to run over me. I still stand by the fact, when ever possible, push the saw away.

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post #27 of 81 Old 10-15-2008, 04:27 PM Thread Starter
 
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I know what you mean about the saw "pulling" itself toward you on the pull stroke. Since my Dad is in town we're putting up tongue and groove reclaimed pine wallboards up in my shop. The wide boards are too wide to cut on the push stroke. Thanks to your guys advice I took the first couple cuts really easy until I found my comfort level with the saw. Great saw though!!!
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post #28 of 81 Old 10-15-2008, 10:19 PM
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The $100 is not a bonus

Some models you have to take the motor off
and ship i to them (Eastern) The money is to cover your labor and shipping.
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post #29 of 81 Old 10-16-2008, 11:53 PM Thread Starter
 
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I'm not sure I understand your post John...
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post #30 of 81 Old 10-29-2008, 04:51 PM
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Originally Posted by TheRecklessOne View Post
I would like to know everyone's opinion on which parts I should replace and which parts I should scrub and oil.
I`m currently looking at a 12" ( also very ugly) for $125. Went online @ Craftsman and most parts are no longer available. Anybody have another parts source ? T.I.A.
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post #31 of 81 Old 03-25-2009, 08:43 AM
 
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Sears radial Saw professional 10

Hi, I saw your pictures & comment on the Forum - I have just aquired the very same machine - I also an original copy of the owners handbook, would you like me to have a look throught it to see if there is any advice?
Best regards,
Philip
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post #32 of 81 Old 03-25-2009, 01:34 PM
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Reckless it's about the safteu upgrade on the RAS. Some models thew can send you the total kit that you can install. Other are different and they will send toy $100 to take and ship the motor to them.
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post #33 of 81 Old 03-25-2009, 05:12 PM
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Exclamation To Push or to Pull, That is the Question!

Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
I use a RAS almost daily and can say that the saw cannot climb over the board and come at you. The motor/saw assembly is a fixed distance between the table and the arm, and does not move up and over a board when cutting. If it does that more than one attachment point is loose or not connected, and in that case the saw should not be used anyway. A dull blade, or pulling too fast may cause some resistance which may put an upward pressure on the motor, but in no way will it climb over a board.

What is important is to have a properly set up saw, use an appropriate blade (negative hook), and it being sharp, and feeding into the cut slowly, and use a slow smooth pull.

A push type cutting procedure requires pulling out the saw, setting up the subject piece, and then doing a push cut. I find counteracting the resistance is easier on a pull cut. If a board is wide, there may not be enough room to pull out the saw to start in front of the work.
Getting to know the feel of any tool and its limits may come with their use, and hopefully add to operator safety.

OK you guys, we are all entitled to our opinions, but these are the facts: When pulling the saw into the workpiece, because of the direction of blade rotation, the first teeth to contact the work are pushing it INTO the table surface and back towards the fence.
When pushing the blade into the workpiece, the first teeth to contact the work are trying to pull/lift it UP OFF the table surface. So it's up to you which way you chose to operate it, but the 2.4 million saw guard recall on Craftsman saws is because the old guard did not properly hold the work down on the table, when ripping, so the website states, the major source of accidents, kickbacks and lawsuits. They did this at great expense and for good reasons.
They offered to buy my older model blade guard and motor back for $100.00, since my saw was not covered under the recall....no way! They want to
"retire it", thanks but I'll keep it going around in cicles.
Cabinetman's point about the width of the workpiece is also well taken.
When cutting with a circular saw/Skill saw the work is pushed up into the base of the saw, trapping it even though you are pushing the saw away from you into the workpiece. The RAS is not the same,since there is no base plate to stop the workpiece from lifting off the table, YOU must securely hold it down.
Which ever method you use it's best to understand what the forces acting on the workpiece are. My opinion, with assorted facts thrown in. bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 04-27-2009 at 08:21 AM.
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post #34 of 81 Old 03-25-2009, 07:17 PM
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That's the same saw I had and gave away after the motor went out of it. I never did get the new guard, but I wish I had just kept it and replaced the motor, since the saw I replaced it with is junk, and the main reason that I don't buy Craftsman any more after many, many years of being a loyal customer.

The new one, in the picture, is now about three years old. Within the first two months the nylon gear for lifting the arm stripped and had to be replaced under warranty. It still doesn't work as smoothly as the old one.

This saw has one safety feature I like, and that is a cable which restricts the forward motion that you're discussing. There are three settings to keep the blade from jumping at you, and the system works well.
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post #35 of 81 Old 03-25-2009, 07:51 PM
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I have to put my 2 cents in about RAS safety and pushing instead of pulling. I'd never heard of this!

Some background: I just retired after 36 years as an Industrial Arts teacher. Wood was not my main area though I was trained in it and taught it some years. I was always next door to a wood shop when I wasn't teaching it. I always taught the kids to pull the RAS. I never had any problem, though the saw was primarily used for crosscutting.

Just to make sure I'm not full of it, I called the guy who was the high school wood teacher for 20+ years. He said the same thing - he never pushed and felt that the RAS was one of the more predictable tools in the shop. He never had an accident with one. The only incident he remembered was when a kid had a dado head on the saw and turned it on when the dado was partly engaged with the edge of the wood. Scared the crap out of everyone but no one was hurt.

I was in another school when a 9th grader cut his index finger half off on the RAS. That was operator error, though, not anything strange the machine did. We always painted the table area orange a couple inches on either side of the blade travel, but the kid wasn't paying attention to where his finger was. That's the only RAS accident I know of in either of the schools I taught in.

The only time I remember my Craftsman RAS trying to walk (run!?) toward me was once when I tried to rip a short piece with the grain perpendicular to the fence. I learned not to do that!

So anyway, I think you're giving the RAS a bad rap - for crosscutting, anyway. I wouldn't rip on a RAS as that is what the TS is for. Blade selection and sharpness is important, too.

The tool that always scared me is the shaper. When I took cabinetmaking in college the Prof said that was the most dangerous tool in the shop, then proceeded to tell horror stories about it. The first year I taught high school wood I unplugged the shaper and stuck it in the corner.

Bill
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post #36 of 81 Old 04-27-2009, 01:06 AM
 
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HP answer

Back at some of the first threads someone asked about HP mine is model 113.199250 it is 2.5 hp if it helps anyone I just put in for my recall I hope I get it But if I dont owell it worked 15 or 20 years before it had one and as a jeweler I have to be very carefull its my jod and when I took shop in school we were told to pull it I guess its up to the user what makes you happy.
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post #37 of 81 Old 04-27-2009, 07:14 PM
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I'll have to call the 800 number tomorrow and ask them about my RAS. I have 2 of these, one of them came up as NOT_EFFECTED_BY_THIS_RECALL, which is fine, but the other says NO_KIT_AVAILABLE.
I don't know if that means they are out for that model or if it's just another way of saying it's not effected.

Thanks for the link to the recall though, I hadn't heard of it before.
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post #38 of 81 Old 04-27-2009, 08:36 PM
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In getting up to date on this thread, I noticed something from TheRecklessOne's post in the picture. You'll see the operator holding the stock with the right hand, and pulling the motor with the left.
.


We might have discussed this before, but in my experience the operator stands to the left of the blade and pulls with the right hand, while holding the stock down with the left hand. This might be in the ergonomic design of the machine as most operators will be right handed. This positioning gets the operator somewhat out of the way of the cut.

Vision to the left is much better, as the motor is not in the way. Setup for the stock is usually to the left of the blade.

If a stop is used, there is the theory that a cut piece can get trapped between the blade and the stop. I will say that good operator procedure and not rushing the cut will help prevent a cutoff from going wild.






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post #39 of 81 Old 04-28-2009, 03:09 PM
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Well that didn't work. I called them to see about the No_Kit_Available message and she said my saw is too old.
Sure, it has the guard that they say needs replaced but since the saw was made in '76 they didn't bother making a kit for it. I guess it doesn't matter that it still runs like a champ.
Oh well, it was worth a shot.
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post #40 of 81 Old 04-28-2009, 04:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mort Tenon View Post

The new one, in the picture, is now about three years old. Within the first two months the nylon gear for lifting the arm stripped and had to be replaced under warranty. It still doesn't work as smoothly as the old one.

This saw has one safety feature I like, and that is a cable which restricts the forward motion that you're discussing. There are three settings to keep the blade from jumping at you, and the system works well.

Hey Mort how many power cords you have on that new saw? I have one almost if not just like it. It,s only about 1 1/2 - 2 years old and has 2 power cords one for the saw and one for the motor that controls the forward motion. Just curious because I was still building my shop and actually took out the extended warranty on it because I just removed it from the box like 2 weeks ago. (I only paid $499, It was a good deal sells for $712 on sale as of today).

I am building cabinets to mount mine to and building like a 10' table and fence for it. So it's going to be like another 2 weeks before I can finish things and get to use the new saw.
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