Seal the granite top on a Ridgid R4511? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 22 Old 04-24-2009, 12:08 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 5
View CAFFEINE's Photo Album My Photos
Question Seal the granite top on a Ridgid R4511?

Hello everybody. First time poster, but I've been lurking for a while as I get more into the hobby/addiction

I picked up a new table saw yesterday - the Ridgid R4511. I couldn't pass up the great price during the Ultimate Power Deal. I will be setting it up this weekend.

Anybody have any advice on whether or not I should seal the granite top like many people do with their granite kitchen counters? Also, what is everybody using to wax their granite topped tools? Thanks in advance.
CAFFEINE is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 22 Old 04-24-2009, 01:08 PM
Senior Member
 
mdlbldrmatt135's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Olean, Ny
Posts: 802
View mdlbldrmatt135's Photo Album My Photos
Send a message via MSN to mdlbldrmatt135 Send a message via Yahoo to mdlbldrmatt135 Send a message via Skype™ to mdlbldrmatt135
Ummmmm why seal something that's not in contact with food?
mdlbldrmatt135 is offline  
post #3 of 22 Old 04-24-2009, 02:07 PM
Senior Member
 
RLHERRON's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 230
View RLHERRON's Photo Album My Photos
If it were mine I would seal it. Not a question of food being on it. The granite is porus and will absorb anything spilled on it. Paint, oil, chemicals, glue etc. I know these things shouldn't be used on the saw, but sometimes they just do

I would seal it and re-apply no less than once or twice a year. Stuff happens in the shop.

Just my thoughts on a good question.

RLH
RLHERRON is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 22 Old 04-25-2009, 09:59 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Park Forest, Il
Posts: 775
View Julian the woodnut's Photo Album My Photos
From what I have heard, it's a composite like quartz, not granite. This would lead me to believe that it is not porous, and will not need to be sealed, with the exception of a good coat of paste wax to keep it slippery.
Julian the woodnut is offline  
post #5 of 22 Old 04-25-2009, 07:34 PM
Junior Member
 
Skidooman93's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 9
View Skidooman93's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Julian the woodnut View Post
From what I have heard, it's a composite like quartz, not granite. This would lead me to believe that it is not porous, and will not need to be sealed, with the exception of a good coat of paste wax to keep it slippery.

Despite what you may have read in other places, those tops are not a quartz or a slizstone/cambria counter top. It is a solid hunk of granite that is mined from a granite slap. Apparently the location where the Steel city saws are maufactured there is granite close by or something that makes it very econmical for SC to use. Don't be fooled it is a solid piece of granite. I have seen and used the SC granite saws, and looked at the new ridgid. The granite should be super stable for the next 2 million years or so and will last and perform as well or better than cast as long as it is taken care of.

Last edited by Skidooman93; 04-26-2009 at 06:16 PM.
Skidooman93 is offline  
post #6 of 22 Old 04-26-2009, 12:00 AM
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 186
View BobbyfromHouston's Photo Album My Photos
I would agree with a couple of posts. I researched it a little a while back. It is solid granite and not a composite. I would also use a good paste wax to seal it but at least just make the surface nice and friction free. This will make it look nice but more importantly help you safely feed stock across the surface.
Just my 2 cents.
Bobby
BobbyfromHouston is offline  
post #7 of 22 Old 04-27-2009, 11:19 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 5
View CAFFEINE's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by RLHERRON View Post
The granite is porus and will absorb anything spilled on it. Paint, oil, chemicals, glue etc. I know these things shouldn't be used on the saw, but sometimes they just do
This was kind of what I was thinking. As long as there's no downside to sealing it I figure it's worth the $15 to protect my investment. I picked up a sealer designed for floors (figured it might be more durable than the sealer for granite countertops). Thanks for all the replies guys.
CAFFEINE is offline  
post #8 of 22 Old 04-27-2009, 01:21 PM
Senior Member
 
dodgeboy77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Bucks County, PA
Posts: 1,768
View dodgeboy77's Photo Album My Photos
Caffeine,

Keep in mind that a floor sealer may have a high slip resistance (friction) component that you would not want on your table. Depending on the sealer, it may lay on a fairly thick coat, which if applied unevenly, might cause problems, too.

How about a good coat of wax?

Bill
dodgeboy77 is offline  
post #9 of 22 Old 04-27-2009, 02:30 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 5
View CAFFEINE's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by dodgeboy77 View Post
Caffeine,

Keep in mind that a floor sealer may have a high slip resistance (friction) component that you would not want on your table. Depending on the sealer, it may lay on a fairly thick coat, which if applied unevenly, might cause problems, too.

How about a good coat of wax?

Bill
Bill,
I hadn't thought about that. I have a piece of granite which I was going to incorporate into a coffee table top at some point. I think I will try out the sealer on that first and see if there is any problem with friction. Thanks for the input! I'll report back what I find out on my "test" as soon as I can get around to it.
CAFFEINE is offline  
post #10 of 22 Old 04-30-2009, 10:19 AM
red
Papa Red
 
red's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Denver NC
Posts: 1,165
View red's Photo Album My Photos
I would just use a quality wax. I have the same saw and waxed the top with two coats and it is as smooth as silk. It is a great saw by the way.

Red

Red
red is offline  
post #11 of 22 Old 05-02-2009, 04:53 AM
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 186
View BobbyfromHouston's Photo Album My Photos
I like
SCjohnson's wax much better than Minwax brand. Just my opinion.
Bobby
BobbyfromHouston is offline  
post #12 of 22 Old 05-07-2009, 10:44 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 5
View CAFFEINE's Photo Album My Photos
Update: I tried out the sealer on a test piece of granite and there was no noticeable difference in friction. I thoroughly cleaned my table with Simple Green Stone cleaner, applied 2 coats of the sealer and let dry/cure overnight, then gave it 2 coats of SC Johnson's Paste Wax. It's super smooth! Thanks for all the replies everybody.
CAFFEINE is offline  
post #13 of 22 Old 05-07-2009, 01:43 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 12,319
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidooman93 View Post
. The granite should be super stable for the next 2 million years or so and will last and perform as well or better than cast as long as it is taken care of.
We will hope that your thoughts are true. I have grave doubts that the granite will stand up to the uses that most of put our saws to. (yes, I know that saws are for sawing, buuuttt) Let us be realistic. Not all of us have professional shops.

My saw is a table as well as a saw. As my space is restircted all available space is used for all purposes. It is going to get glue, paint and all sorts of other things on it. When my saw is not being used for it's real purpose it is covered with a piece of cardboard and used as just another garage table.

I know that some of you are going to be horrified at what I am saying, but I will bet that at least half of all table saws out there receive the same, or even worse, treatment.

George
GeorgeC is offline  
post #14 of 22 Old 05-07-2009, 04:39 PM
Creative sawdust maker
 
ScottyB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Whatcom County, WA
Posts: 348
View ScottyB's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
We will hope that your thoughts are true. I have grave doubts that the granite will stand up to the uses that most of put our saws to. (yes, I know that saws are for sawing, buuuttt) Let us be realistic. Not all of us have professional shops.

My saw is a table as well as a saw. As my space is restircted all available space is used for all purposes. It is going to get glue, paint and all sorts of other things on it. When my saw is not being used for it's real purpose it is covered with a piece of cardboard and used as just another garage table.

I know that some of you are going to be horrified at what I am saying, but I will bet that at least half of all table saws out there receive the same, or even worse, treatment.

George
I have been really bad about that with my Ridgid plastic table saw. After spending a good chunk of the morning cleaning up the saw I picked up in the Old Iron thread I would really like to change my habits and keep the table clear. Especially after all the effort i have already put into cleaning up the 70 year old table. I do like the cardboard idea though as a stopgap.
ScottyB is offline  
post #15 of 22 Old 07-13-2009, 10:39 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 43
View Danxt's Photo Album My Photos
Sealing with a wax seems like a good idea... can I just use regular car wax?

Hey all, Dan here, newb on this forum.

I bought the r4511 a few months ago, and I have been nothing but happy with it. I have put it through it's paces pretty well, and done heavy ripping (about 15 sheets of 3/4 oak ply) and very fine cuts as well.
The initial setup was a bear (mostly because of the weight and because i'm very picky about the precision), but everything has stayed 100% true with no adjustments needed.
I do plan on swapping out the blade for a finer cutting one, as most of my TS work is not heavy ripping.

I used to use my old TS as an extra assembly table and whatnot... but I have since cured myself of that by putting the TS in a separate part of my shop where I'm not tempted to randomly set stuff on it.
Danxt is offline  
post #16 of 22 Old 07-14-2009, 12:32 AM
But No Glue...
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Antelope, CA
Posts: 11
View EnoughClamps's Photo Album My Photos
Don't Use Automotive Wax...

First, Welcome to the Forum Dan. I am just getting started too. Have been doing a lot of reading. I am sure these guys can be a great help for answering any questions...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Danxt View Post
Sealing with a wax seems like a good idea... can I just use regular car wax?
Of the advise I have read, automotive wax contains silicone. When (not if, but when) the silicone transfers from the saw top to your workpiece it plays havoc with finishing.

Search the forum for Paste Wax. You'll find a few opinions, one brand better than the other, etc. But the general consensus is to use Paste Wax.

Enough Clamps,
But No Glue...
_ Every step of any project should be considered your masterpiece if you want the finished product to reflect the quality of your work. - gregL
_ Take the time to look into the grain of the wood as it emerges. It took a lot of years for that to grow, why waste it in chips and dust? - Sonny E.

Last edited by EnoughClamps; 07-14-2009 at 01:44 AM.
EnoughClamps is offline  
post #17 of 22 Old 03-05-2013, 09:31 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: from SC. now in Alabama
Posts: 2
View BLOCKADERUNNER's Photo Album My Photos
NewB here with his 2 cents worth on Granite tops, but 1st hello to everyone. this looks like a good group;
I always used a chemical call Top Coat; it comes in a spray bomb on my Jet cast iron saw. You spray it on let dry for a couple minutes, then buff off with a clean rag. No rust and the wood floated across the saw and best of all it had NO silicone in it.
I just got a new granite top and I think I’m going to use Top Coat on it also. I read the granite already has sealer on it and I’m afraid of wax, because it may have that nasty silicone in it. The guys that speak of paste wax may have a special brand without any silicone in it.
For those that don’t know, silicone is bad around wood working, because it can get in your wood & you never see it until your project is finished and you go to put some stain or a finish on and then it shows up. Learned that the hard way, also I’m not pushing any brand, just stating what has worked for me in the past.
Well let me go sacrifice a 2 x 4 to the great wood god
BLOCKADERUNNER is offline  
post #18 of 22 Old 03-05-2013, 09:53 PM
Senior Member
 
Stevedore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Morris County, New Joisey
Posts: 570
View Stevedore's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
My saw is a table as well as a saw. As my space is restircted all available space is used for all purposes. It is going to get glue, paint and all sorts of other things on it. When my saw is not being used for it's real purpose it is covered with a piece of cardboard and used as just another garage table.


George
Nice to know I'm not alone! I use an old piece of 1/2" OSB on mine to keep the paint, glue, blood, tears, etc., off the saw.
Stevedore is offline  
post #19 of 22 Old 03-05-2013, 11:35 PM
Senior Member
 
dodgeboy77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Bucks County, PA
Posts: 1,768
View dodgeboy77's Photo Album My Photos
Blockaderunner,

A lot of guys here like to use good 'ole Johnson's Paste Wax. It's cheap, has no silicone and is available all over the place.

Anyone notice that this thread was started in '09?

Bill
dodgeboy77 is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to dodgeboy77 For This Useful Post:
vinnypatternmaker (03-07-2013)
post #20 of 22 Old 03-07-2013, 10:22 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 479
View vinnypatternmaker's Photo Album My Photos
Hi!
We love Butcher's Wax (trade name), it's a bit more expensive, but it's great! Long shelf life (30 years and counting), and buffs out beautifully !
Just our 2 cents!
Best,
Marena and Vinny

Last edited by vinnypatternmaker; 03-09-2013 at 10:15 PM.
vinnypatternmaker is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to vinnypatternmaker For This Useful Post:
BLOCKADERUNNER (03-09-2013), dodgeboy77 (03-08-2013)
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Granite Top - Steel City Saw blankcek Power Tools & Machinery 25 03-31-2010 12:07 PM
Ridgid R4511 Table Saw Ashman Tool Reviews 17 01-24-2010 03:57 AM
Ridgid Granite Top Table Saw TheRecklessOne Tool Reviews 25 11-01-2009 08:25 AM
Ridged r4511 saw dgzrt General Woodworking Discussion 2 03-30-2009 10:01 AM
granite look Tony B Wood Finishing 1 09-06-2008 01:04 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome