Right blade CS for a righty person - isn't that counter intuitive? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 20 Old 07-22-2016, 10:00 AM Thread Starter
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Right blade CS for a righty person - isn't that counter intuitive?

It looks like most of the corded circular saws have blade on the right. Cordless are usually the opposite. I am righty and want to go corded. Having blade on the right is kinda counter-intuitive for me. If I want to see the blade and the cut, I have to lean over the CS. I know that some companies make both styles (left and right) but I am just talking about the CS available at local home improvement stores. Pretty much all corded CS at Home Depot have blade on the right. So what's the deal with that? Being a noob in WW, am I missing something obvious here?
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post #2 of 20 Old 07-22-2016, 11:58 AM
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This is mostly a guess. Most people are right handed and hold the saw in their right hand, hold the stock to be cut with their left hand and supported underneath the left hand allowing the cutoff to fall to the right. Having the blade on the right keeps the bulk of the saw over the supported stock and not over the cutoff.
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post #3 of 20 Old 07-22-2016, 12:49 PM
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A CS with the blade on the left for a righty, will fill your face full of saw dust. I like to use my finger as a guide when ripping some stock. I will hold the shoe with my hand and let the wood ride against my fingers as a guide. I can't do that on a left bladed saw. Another thing is with a left blade, the off fall will fall on your feet instead of the other side.
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post #4 of 20 Old 07-22-2016, 01:25 PM
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First of you don't look at the blade, there is an indicator in front of the blade that you follow the line with, looking at the blade will have you wandering all over the place. Generally it is better to follow a guide such as a speed square if you are not adept at making straight accurate cuts.

There is a good reason that most of the circular saws are the right side blade models which has already been explained. Left blade models have their uses, and are preferred by some for one reason or another depending on the person and the job at hand. Often it is what you get used to as both have advantages and disadvantages, I used the right blade corded style for years, but soon adapted to the left blade cordless style.

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post #5 of 20 Old 07-22-2016, 02:25 PM Thread Starter
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It all makes sense now. I guess I still have lots to learn. :-)

Thanks for all the replies.
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post #6 of 20 Old 07-22-2016, 03:09 PM
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I know cordless sales now exceed corded tool sales by over 50%. Cordless tools are handy, no doubt about it. But I still prefer a corded CS over a cordless for several reasons.
1. I don't use a CS often enough for it to be charged and ready when I'm ready to make a cut.
So, my batteries are down and I. Will need to charge first.
2. Although cordless has come a long way on improving power, the corded tools are still more powerful.
3. Circular saws pull a charged battery down fast.

I have several cordless tools but I've never bought a cordless circular saw.
My favorite cordless tool is a cordless screwdriver.
Next is my cordless nailer.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #7 of 20 Old 07-22-2016, 04:15 PM
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The whys of cordless .....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman50 View Post
I know cordless sales now exceed corded tool sales by over 50%. Cordless tools are handy, no doubt about it. But I still prefer a corded CS over a cordless for several reasons.
1. I don't use a CS often enough for it to be charged and ready when I'm ready to make a cut.
B.... So, my batteries are down and I. Will need to charge first.
2. Although cordless has come a long way on improving power, the corded tools are still more powerful.
3. Circular saws pull a charged battery down fast.

A ...I have several cordless tools but I've never bought a cordless circular saw.
My favorite cordless tool is a cordless screwdriver.
Next is my cordless nailer.

A. You have several cordless tools.
B. The batteries won't be charged for use in a circular saw.

Don't you need your batteries charged for your other cordless tools? Why wouldn't they be charged for use in a circular saw?

Anyway, I have 3 systems of cordless tools, Dewalt, Milwaukee and Rigid all have drills, impacts, and circular saws. I started moving into Milwaukee cordless tools a few years ago after at least 10 years of Dewalt because the batteries were failing at an alarming rate towards the end. I must have 20 "dead": Dewalt batteries that won't charge. It was cheaper to buy a two tool set that included 2 batteries and a charger, than it was to buy 2 new batteries, so that's why I ended up with so many batteries and so many Dewalt tools.

The Rigids were on sale real cheap, with HD batteries and they are guaranteed for life, so that's how I ended up with those. They are really great drills, impact drivers and the circular saw has a lot of power and run time.

The Milwaukees started off with a 1/2 H D impact driver that had tons of power for my son's auto repair career. I was so impressed I got the smaller impacts, drills and circular saw for my self. I am still impressed. :smile3: Now I'm waiting for the Dewalts to die off and I can get down to 2 brands, but it's unlikely that will happen soon.

All my cordless tools are 18 VOLT , but the Milwukees and Rigids are Lithium Ion batteries. If starting over, the new Milwaukke Fuel LI would be where I would go. If you have several cordless tools, it's almost a sure thing you'll have several charged batteries to put into service should one die in the middle of a project.... and they have in my case. I'd only use a corded tool if I knew I was going to saw 1 1/2" thick stock or 7/8" siding or rip plywood all day long. Mine sit unused for the most part in a drawer in the shop.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 07-22-2016 at 05:54 PM.
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post #8 of 20 Old 07-22-2016, 06:14 PM
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With my Makita batteries it takes about 15 minutes for a charge, so if I run one down and put it on the charger immediately it will usually be charged before the other one has given up. If you have three batteries you will have no problems with waiting so it is a good idea to stay in the same family with your cordless tools.

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post #9 of 20 Old 07-22-2016, 09:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
A. You have several cordless tools.
B. The batteries won't be charged for use in a circular saw.

Don't you need your batteries charged for your other cordless tools? Why wouldn't they be charged for use in a circular saw?
.

Very few of my tools are new. The only Lithium batteries I have are for a Cordless DeWalt drill and a cordless Paslode nailer. All my other batteries are still NiCad. (Much longer charge times).
My batteries are different and specific to the tools I have.
I know, I know, I should have a matched set of cordless using the same batteries, but I don't.
The store Batteries Plus has kept me going on a few older cordless batteries.
Also, I don't use a Skilsaw very much. I have several saws in my shop,
and the CS gets used very infrequently.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #10 of 20 Old 07-22-2016, 09:51 PM Thread Starter
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I have small Craftsman cordless CS with three batteries but I do not like it. Not enough juice for some jobs even with the 19.2 Lithium battery. Could be the motor though as I have the 5 1/4" blade version. I want to go corded.
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post #11 of 20 Old 07-22-2016, 11:06 PM
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then I would buy this ...

I posted this one on your other thread and I still think it's a great saw for under $100.00. It's got a 15 amp motor and weighs 11.1lbs. so it's heavy duty. Used with a guide for ripping or crosscutting it will not be so heavy since the saw's base will rest o9n the material to be cut.

If you need a lighter saw, then I would look for a 6 1/2" saw. I have an older Porter Cable Saw Boss in 6 1/2 and it's very handy for non-supported work. Here's one:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/RIDGID-Fuego...-/272262302318


A used one at $40.00 with ebay's money back guarantee:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/RIDGID-R3203...-/182209896087

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 07-22-2016 at 11:12 PM.
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post #12 of 20 Old 07-22-2016, 11:20 PM
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Throw some more money at this and get ....

A track saw will cut straight lines more accurately and for another $100.00 or so you can get this one:
http://www.grizzly.com/products/Trac...campaign=zPage

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #13 of 20 Old 07-22-2016, 11:52 PM
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Perhaps they are trying to correct the way the saw is made and the corded tools are not there yet. I've always thought a corded circular saw was made backwards.
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post #14 of 20 Old 07-24-2016, 01:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
Perhaps they are trying to correct the way the saw is made and the corded tools are not there yet. I've always thought a corded circular saw was made backwards.
The first "Skilsaw" was technically a left hand style, then they switched:


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post #15 of 20 Old 07-24-2016, 01:27 PM
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bladed vs handed

Since the saw has no knowledge of which hand it will be held and used with, I prefer to call them right or left bladed. I have both types and there are advantages to either.






In general, worm drive saws are left bladed and contractor saws are right bladed. So if you are a house framer, you can use either type depending on what the cut calls for. Occasionally, the motor is in the way to complete a pass on roofing rafters and you do need the opposite blade saw.


Porter Cable made contractor saws with both right and left blades years ago and may still offer them:



The worm drive, left bladed saws used by house framers, especially in California, used them vertically where the weight of the saw assisted the cut and was not resting on the work entirely:


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 07-24-2016 at 03:27 PM.
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post #16 of 20 Old 07-24-2016, 02:48 PM
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Building stairs, you will need both right and left bladed saws. Both right and left, outside skirts on an open stairs can not be mitered with just one circular saw, unless you back the saw in and that is really spooky, not mention dangerous.

Try cutting rafter tails with a worm drive, that thing will wear your arm out big time.

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post #17 of 20 Old 07-24-2016, 04:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Since the saw has no knowledge of which hand it will be held and used with, I prefer to call them right or left bladed. I have both types and there are advantages to either.

snip
Or it could be common term of reference to differentiate which side the blade is on as opposed to north, south east or west side of the saw. :smile3:

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post #18 of 20 Old 07-24-2016, 06:28 PM
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Lol

My point was that either saw, right bladed or left bladed could be used in either hand. So "handedness" doesn't fully describe the type of saw in my opinion and is not used in the product descriptions when searching.

So, if North is straight ahead or up and South is down or below, East would be to the right and left to the West?


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #19 of 20 Old 07-24-2016, 09:46 PM
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Sorry, left or left hand blade describes the side of the saw the blade is on, it is not describing the saw, do you use a wrench in your left hand to loosen or tighten left hand threaded nuts?

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post #20 of 20 Old 07-24-2016, 09:58 PM
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Sorry, I ain't givin' up yet

When you search for a left blade circular saw here's what you get: saws with the blade on the left:
http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&page...circular%20saw

when you search for left handed circular saw here's what you get:
http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&page...circular%20saw
Some are left bladed, some are right bladed.... confusing to say the least. It does indeed describe the saw... better than left or right handed. Like I said, the saw doesn't know which hand you intend to use to cut with .... just sayin'.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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