Restoring Craftsman 113 Table Saw - Unsure about motor - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 15 Old 03-17-2017, 01:12 PM Thread Starter
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Question Restoring Craftsman 113 Table Saw - Unsure about motor

I recently acquired a rust-covered Craftsman table saw, model 113.27520, ca. 1956. I've been restoring it and it's been going well. The biggest issue thus far was that the original Craftsman motor was bad. I just bought another old, identical motor, model number 115.7534.

I know very little about electric motors, let alone older motors such as this. It seems to run fine, but when I turn the arbor by hand it doesn't spin as freely as I would think it should. It also makes a small "click" sound at the end of each turn. This could be normal for old motors such as this, but I have no idea and am hoping I won't have to buy another motor or spend a lot repairing this one.

What should my next steps be in making sure this thing is ready to go? Will I need to replace any bearings? Lubricate anything etc?

Here are links to my videos of the motor in question:

Thanks in advance!
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post #2 of 15 Old 03-17-2017, 01:54 PM
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I don't know about the clicking sound when you spun it by hand, but it sounded fine when it was running. As far as free spinning by hand, I wouldn't expect it to on an electric motor that size and vintage...at a minimum there is friction from the brushes.

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post #3 of 15 Old 03-17-2017, 02:41 PM
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No brushes in that motor, sounds like a dry bearing...
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post #4 of 15 Old 03-17-2017, 03:10 PM
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I don't know about the motor, but the saw looks great. Good job.
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post #5 of 15 Old 03-17-2017, 04:15 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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that's the centrifugal switch

The switch engages and disengages the run or start windings as it revs up. That motor has no brushes. Only a motor marked AC/DC has brushes, called a universal type motor. Hand held power tools, drills and circular saws have them. Direct drive saws,.... el cheapos have them also. That motor is as bulletproof as they come. Just belt it up and run it!

That restoration look really nice! I owned a Craftsman 100 saw from the 60's with that same look only mine was a gold color. It ran for 45 years, never quit, I just wanted to part it out for the table.
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #6 of 15 Old 03-17-2017, 04:59 PM
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Shoot summ nailed it the bearings sound like they need some lube or replaced

I have dodged the replacement of bearings by getting a small hypodermic needle and syringe and stick the needle through the seal and squirt in some light machine oil like 3 in 1. You can get the syringe and needle at TSC or about any other store that sells veterinary supplies

But it would probably run a long time with the use most hobby saws see

If you do decide to replace the bearings be fragile with the centrifugal switch
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post #7 of 15 Old 03-17-2017, 05:27 PM
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The original motor manual says you can repack the bearings. See "Lubrication" on the last page.

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post #8 of 15 Old 03-17-2017, 07:40 PM
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What has the restoration consisted of?
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post #9 of 15 Old 03-17-2017, 09:59 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
The switch engages and disengages the run or start windings as it revs up.
Thanks! I've confirmed the noise is indeed the switch, and even better, the rough, possibly bearing noise has quieted down since running it for a few minutes.

And is this by chance similar to the saw that you used to own? I found this on craigslist in my area just last night while scoping out additional parts:
https://columbiamo.craigslist.org/tls/6019748214.html
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post #10 of 15 Old 03-17-2017, 10:23 PM Thread Starter
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subroc: The most intensive part of the restoration thus far was removing the horrible rust from the cast-iron top. I hesitated using Naval Jelly to remove it because I was worried it would leave deep, pitted spots as it ate through the rust, but it turned out just fine. I put a generous coat of naval jelly on it and scrubbed it gently with a a brass bristled brush, then repeated. Once the top was completely rust-free and smooth I wiped it down with some mineral spirits and applied a few coats of Johnson's paste wax. I probably put a layer of wax on it every other day for about a week. I love how the dust that settles on it just seems to roll right off. :)

The blue-gray "body" of the table saw has tiny rust spots everywhere, but I haven't decided if I'm going to repaint yet it or not. I thoroughly cleaned it and applied wax to it also.

I can tell you if you want to retain the swirled/circular pattern the aluminum facing (which I think is one of the best visual aspects of this saw), DO NOT try to polish it -even with the slightest abrasive cream polish. I tested a nickel-sized area behind one of the knobs and the brushed circular pattern disappeared with ease. I ended up just spraying some windex onto a rag and wiping it down that way.

Once I have time to go back and find before and after photos, I'll attach 'em.
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post #11 of 15 Old 03-17-2017, 10:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnytcomo View Post
subroc: The most intensive part of the restoration thus far was removing the horrible rust from the cast-iron top. I hesitated using Naval Jelly to remove it because I was worried it would leave deep, pitted spots as it ate through the rust, but it turned out just fine. I put a generous coat of naval jelly on it and scrubbed it gently with a a brass bristled brush, then repeated. Once the top was completely rust-free and smooth I wiped it down with some mineral spirits and applied a few coats of Johnson's paste wax. I probably put a layer of wax on it every other day for about a week. I love how the dust that settles on it just seems to roll right off. :)

The blue-gray "body" of the table saw has tiny rust spots everywhere, but I haven't decided if I'm going to repaint yet it or not. I thoroughly cleaned it and applied wax to it also.

I can tell you if you want to retain the swirled/circular pattern the aluminum facing (which I think is one of the best visual aspects of this saw), DO NOT try to polish it -even with the slightest abrasive cream polish. I tested a nickel-sized area behind one of the knobs and the brushed circular pattern disappeared with ease. I ended up just spraying some windex onto a rag and wiping it down that way.

Once I have time to go back and find before and after photos, I'll attach 'em.
Sounds good. Sometimes a clean up is all it needs. How are the arbor bearings? Did anything inside need any work or repair? Raise/lower shafts and operation? Blade tilt? Any extensive clean-up or repair?
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post #12 of 15 Old 03-18-2017, 01:01 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by subroc View Post
Sounds good. Sometimes a clean up is all it needs. How are the arbor bearings? Did anything inside need any work or repair? Raise/lower shafts and operation? Blade tilt? Any extensive clean-up or repair?
Arbor bearings were a little rough (I can't say I'm a good judge of what's "rough" though), but once I added a few drops of 3-1 oil, the rotation seemed to smooth out A LOT.
As far as the shafts/bolts & overall operation goes: everything was a bit rusty, but after working it all over with some WD-40 and a metal brush, it all seems to be moving as intended. The "under-carriage" seems so bulky and durable it's hard to know what to look for.

Tomorrow I'm hoping to start aligning everything and maybe even use it to start the bench it's going to fit into!
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post #13 of 15 Old 03-18-2017, 07:34 AM
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BTW, I expect that double pulley on the motor is from a Craftsman/King-Seeley floor model/cabinet saw. Maybe the motor is too.
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post #14 of 15 Old 03-18-2017, 08:50 AM
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Yup, that's it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnytcomo View Post
Thanks! I've confirmed the noise is indeed the switch, and even better, the rough, possibly bearing noise has quieted down since running it for a few minutes.

And is this by chance similar to the saw that you used to own? I found this on craigslist in my area just last night while scoping out additional parts:
https://columbiamo.craigslist.org/tls/6019748214.html
It's the standard depth saw at 27" front to back. There's all sorts of accessories, from miter gauges, to side extensions, and maybe even a splitter or blade guard on Ebay.

Do not inject oil into a sealed ball bearing. Bearings require grease, not oil and the oil will dissolve the grease making it less effective. It may help to soften old hardened grease however. Bushings use oil, like the bronze ones in old an old lathe. Newer lathes use sealed ball bearings.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #15 of 15 Old 01-03-2018, 10:37 PM
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I can't help (and am having a problem with my motor as well!) but just wanted to say that's a beautiful restoration!
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