Restored OSS... well sort of - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 03-04-2009, 08:21 AM Thread Starter
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Restored OSS... well sort of

I had been looking for a OSS for a long time. I am an old tool guy and all the State's or other old OSS's I found were out of my price range or on the wrong coast or something else.

Then someone over at Woodnet offered me this





No. 2 Jewel Grinder
Motor City Machine
Detroit Michigan.
with a Howell Electric R/I motor.

I wasn't really sure what it was and it was up in Ann Arbor. But in a just a few weeks Arn Fest was going. I knew if I could find someone that could pick it up, it could hitch a ride with Dan down to Chattanooga and I could pick it up there.

After a lot of emails and a few photos I decided it would work but I still wasn't sure what it was. It just didn't look like an OSS. I have searched and searched and I can find nothing on this machine or the company. It is as if they made this one machine and disappeared. But I suspect that it was just a specialty machine.

I did get this from a metal working forum member:

Boyar Schultz made two or three different sizes of profile grinder. I owned a small size No. 1, which was a bench model. They have tilting tables and a spindle that holds 1/4" shank mounted wheels or carbide burs. I believe they were used to make sheet metal blanking dies and punches. They have adjustable travel above the table, so they can also do work in molding cavities.

Based on that I think it was Profile Grinder for some type of metal work. But again, speculation.

I have had it cosmetically restored for a while but was having trouble with spindles for it. This thing is such an odd ball. It has a collet machines on the motor shaft for a 1/2 spindle. No way to change it out.

I finally found a way to adapt a set of Lee Valley long (drill press) spindles to it using a router adapter sleeve. I got the wiring finished up and fired it up and put it use. Works like a champ!







My favorite part of using the machine is the strong smell of Ozone coming from the old Repulsion/Induction motor. Reminds me of my Lionel trains from childhood.
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post #2 of 9 Old 03-04-2009, 01:56 PM
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Kudzu,
The Smithsonian just called and want to know who stole their Flux Capicator Nuclear Fission Generator.
Really, that thing looks really cool, nice job on the restoration. Almost seems like it belongs on a submarine or something official like that. Nice job.
Mike Hawkins
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post #3 of 9 Old 03-04-2009, 04:09 PM Thread Starter
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Its such an odd ball machine. But now that you mention it, it does resemble a periscope mechanism. Well to me.

One of the really odd thing is the oscillating mechanism. There is a little Dumoore gear motor hanging on the back. There is a cam under the motor driven by the motor. What is really odd, the armature shaft inside the motor actually lifts up inside the motor. The motor doesn't move. So he motor was obviously purpose built and not off the shelf.

Last edited by Kudzu; 03-04-2009 at 08:53 PM.
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post #4 of 9 Old 03-04-2009, 07:27 PM
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Nice job. It looks like a new tool. Is it loud? Does it vibrate? Can you grill a steak on it?
Looks fantastic.
Ken

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post #5 of 9 Old 03-05-2009, 04:25 PM
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Nice find, looks like a real beast. A whole lot of steel to perform a rather simple operation. Nice job on the restoration.
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post #6 of 9 Old 03-06-2009, 01:17 AM
 
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Awesome job! What kind of tablesaw is that in the background. I would like to see a picture of it as well.
Bobby
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post #7 of 9 Old 03-06-2009, 07:12 AM
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That is one cool looking machine. When you get tired of it being in your way I will be glad to take it off your hands. Best thing is, It's old, it's been refurbished, it lives again, and someone appreciates it. You can buy something new, but you cant beet the quality of a good cast iron tool. Thanks for posting it.

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post #8 of 9 Old 03-06-2009, 03:50 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike65072 View Post
Nice find, looks like a real beast. A whole lot of steel to perform a rather simple operation. Nice job on the restoration.
True, but that is the way we built them in the 30's and 40's. Something that would last! Not wear out and have to be replaced in 10-15 years. But I won't go there.

Also if this was a metal grinder as I suspect it was. It needed to be more rigid than for sanding wood.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BobbyfromHouston View Post
Awesome job! What kind of tablesaw is that in the background. I would like to see a picture of it as well.
1946 0r 47 Unisaw. I forgotten which one. It's a story in itself. I will post some photos on in latter on. Just walked in and eating a snack. Got to write a report and get it out first.

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post #9 of 9 Old 03-06-2009, 11:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike65072 View Post
Nice find, looks like a real beast. A whole lot of steel to perform a rather simple operation. Nice job on the restoration.
there is no such thing as overkill when it comes to power tools
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