Recommendation for a pin nailer - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 13 Old 02-10-2018, 03:33 PM Thread Starter
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Recommendation for a pin nailer

What pin nailer would you recommend?

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post #2 of 13 Old 02-10-2018, 06:45 PM
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I have a Stanley Bostich pneumatic, but it is 25 years old at least. During the last quarter century, much has changed, and now battery operated 18 gauge brad nailers are available on several different battery platforms.

Not as compact as a pneumatic, so if corners are tight, keep that in mind. But not having the air hose is likely wonderful for most situations, unless the battery tool is underpowered, runs out of juice too soon, is too heavy to hold overhead, or jambs a lot because it is cheaply made (which is more likely than not nowadays).
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post #3 of 13 Old 02-10-2018, 07:13 PM
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Grex. Smallest hole from a pin nailer.
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post #4 of 13 Old 02-10-2018, 10:01 PM
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I am using the 23 gauge pin nailer from Harbor Freight. (It requires an air compressor.) I don't know how it compares with the Grex that @J_L recommends for hole size. I can say that our Harbor Freight pin nailer makes smaller holes than the expensive pin nailers used by the professional contractors who did work in our home. (... and I used the same nails; they left a few behind.)

I use it from time to time, not every day. When I pull it out, it works. I always put in 4 drops of tool oil before I start using it.

I chose the Harbor Freight pin nailer because it was very inexpensive, and Harbor Freight has a good return policy. For me, this is a Harbor Freight tool that worked and did not have to be returned.

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post #5 of 13 Old 02-10-2018, 10:38 PM
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Anything Senco. I'm a bit biased as I used to work there but I do really like their products.

"Dreams are stronger than poison and seize more firmly than disease, once captured one can not escape. It's a real curse, but for adventurers who are dedicated to it, body and soul, people without dreams are more frightening than death" (Made in Abyss). The Twenty Seventeen anime of the year, it definitely deserves that award. It's a show you don't expect to throw you off as much as it does. It may be Moe but it's certainly not lighthearted, just the opposite.
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post #6 of 13 Old 02-10-2018, 11:35 PM
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The thing that makes one pin nailer better then another is its ability to shoot long pins straight so not to exit the side of the piece you are nailing too. I have a Porter Cable 21 gauge nailer, there are definitely better ones.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
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post #7 of 13 Old 02-11-2018, 11:29 AM
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I have a PC 23 gauge 13/8 pin nailer and love it, you don't even need to fill the holes they are so small, and the little pins really hold pretty good, you can't pull them they will break

CPO had some remans for $69, when I got it it looked like new

There is no app for experience
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post #8 of 13 Old 02-12-2018, 05:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Q View Post
The thing that makes one pin nailer better then another is its ability to shoot long pins straight so not to exit the side of the piece you are nailing too. I have a Porter Cable 21 gauge nailer, there are definitely better ones.
I got out my Harbor Freight 23 gauge pin nailer for a project yesterday, so I tried it on the hardest wood I could find, a piece that had been reclaimed from furniture. I fired nails in all directions. You couldn't see the ones that were buried, but when I tried nails through corners, they poked out straight without bending, in whatever direction they had been fired. I like it; it just works.

IMPORTANT NOTE: The Harbor Freight 23 gauge pin nailer has a terrible safety. All it does is block the trigger, and it is easily swung out of the way either right or left, unintentionally. The trigger is very easy to fire. If you have little ones around, keep this pin nailer away from them.
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post #9 of 13 Old 02-12-2018, 10:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeebyWoodWorker View Post
Anything Senco. I'm a bit biased as I used to work there but I do really like their products.
Senco is a professional brand. They will cost more but they are not a throw-away tool. Senco tools can be repaired if needed and should last a very long time.
There are many cheap throw-away tools on the market. Use them until they break and then discard them. Many of these cheaper tools will do the job for a DIY guy.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #10 of 13 Old 02-12-2018, 10:51 AM
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I use hitachi at work and Senco at home..We use several brands of nails with the hitachi...

Don't confuse new Senco with old Senco. Totally different...
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post #11 of 13 Old 02-12-2018, 01:24 PM
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Not only is Senco not what it used to be, neither are fasteners. I just went through this last week.

I have an old school NR83A 21 degree framing nailer, that is about 25 years old, so it lacks all the onboard sequential vs bump fire and depth of drive adjustments that the subsequent A2 and current A3 have. Yet, I wanted to use my old nailer to attach wood siding, which needs a smaller diameter and shorter nail, not a long framing sinker. As the photo below shows, I pimped my gun out with a nose bushing at the tip and an onsite Norgren regulator to control pressure to 77 lbs for a perfect flush head drive of .113 diameter ring shanks that are 2.375" long. Not pins, but the topic is now on current quality of nailers and collated nails.



I used to buy Senco nails 20 years ago, when Senco was the goto company for pnuematic fastening. I then bought Hitachi branded nails, figuring why not, I have a Hitachi gun. The Hitach nails were made in Oman. Ok, whatever. Then DeWalt started getting into the collated nail business with their brand, and offered a hot dipped galvanized, ESR-1539 rated, ASTM A153 rated, ACQ approved, ring shank in the lengths I needed, and they were made in Oman, just like the Hitachi nails. Prolly the exact same plant, because Oman is a very small country... how many nail manufacturing plants can they possibly have in the desert with a coastline?

But then my next case of DeWalt nails, exact same nails, said Made In China. Ok, let's take a closer look here, because I've been burned by poor Chinese quality too many times not to take a closer look. I picked up a case of HALSTEED collated nails of the same size, just not HDG, and not ring, but the HALSTEED nails met the LA RR 23633 code, and ESR1667, and one more code, 17something, that didn't apply to me, but was interesting all the same, as neither the DeWalt nor the Hitach branded nails were stated to meet those other codes.

Vice test. I put the Halsteed nail and the Dewalt nail in the vise. I first measured and marked each nail, so that their depth of insertion into the vise jaws would be exactly the same. With pliers, I bent each nail 90 degrees. Then I proceeded to bend them back and forth in 180 degree arcs to see how many bends it would take to fatigue the nail to separation. The Dewalt nail came apart in ONE bend. The Halsteed nail took SIX full bends to separate. I repeated the test a half a dozen times. Every construction guy who came by that day, I showed them the test. I had them do the test themselves. In every single instance, the Halsteed nail was able to be bent back and forth a minimum of four times, an average of five times, and a maximum of six times, back and forth before separation. The DeWalt branded nail, of the same length and diameter, could only be bent a maximum of two times back and forth before separation.

The Halsteed nails are Made In USA, by the way, by True Island Steel. Their website is horrible, so I had to call the company to have a list of all the collated nail sizes and coatings that Halsteed offers emailed to me. Hitachi, DeWalt, Senco, and the lot can all go pound sand. I want to pound nails that can survive a little earthquake shake now and again. I don't have time for recycled pot metal. I was really quite surprised at the difference, and feel terrible that I didn't start testing nails several years ago, when all this import stuff started dominating most of our readily available retail choices.

This may or may not apply to the quality of pins that the OP seeks, but it might be useful for anyone reading to know that there was a 3 to 5 times difference in the separation cycles between one branded nail made overseas vs another made domestically.
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post #12 of 13 Old 02-12-2018, 01:46 PM
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What made PC big in nailers was their combo package. I think every trimmer in KC bought one. The PC nails also worked in Senco 15guage nailers which Senco should have stopped in the earlier days. PC still didn;t get into the factories though. INTERCHANGE did

Duo-fast did well in cabinet shops as well...
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post #13 of 13 Old 02-12-2018, 10:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman50 View Post
Senco is a professional brand. They will cost more but they are not a throw-away tool. Senco tools can be repaired if needed and should last a very long time.
There are many cheap throw-away tools on the market. Use them until they break and then discard them. Many of these cheaper tools will do the job for a DIY guy.
I use my Senco gun at work almost everyday, over the last four months or so I've put around fifty thousand nails through it (I know because I keep the nice plastic boxes they come in to store screws). They hold up really well and do last quite a long time if cared for properly. Honestly I think it's worth it to buy a nice tool that will last. Before I got the Senco I used a Cadex at work, it only lasted about three months before it stopped firing and had to be sent out for repair for the second time since the company had it. I have heard Cadex is a good brand but I haven't used more than one before.

If it's only going to be used for a short time or every once in a while then a cheaper tool can indeed be a better choice.

"Dreams are stronger than poison and seize more firmly than disease, once captured one can not escape. It's a real curse, but for adventurers who are dedicated to it, body and soul, people without dreams are more frightening than death" (Made in Abyss). The Twenty Seventeen anime of the year, it definitely deserves that award. It's a show you don't expect to throw you off as much as it does. It may be Moe but it's certainly not lighthearted, just the opposite.
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