RECIPRO-CURVE circle/arch cutting reciprocating blade - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
View Poll Results: Would you guys buy one and how much would you pay?
Yes - would probably pay $20 0 0%
Yes - would probably pay $15 0 0%
Yes - would probably pay $10 1 50.00%
No - I wouldn't buy one 1 50.00%
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post #1 of 15 Old 02-15-2012, 07:05 PM Thread Starter
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Lightbulb RECIPRO-CURVE circle/arch cutting reciprocating blade

Hey fellow craftsman. I have a patent pending on a new reciprocating saw blade design and would like some of your opinions on it. I'm getting ready to take it to market. It's called the RECIPRO-CURVE and for all you guys that have tried to cut circles with traditional reciprocating blades or are sick of expensive hole saws, this is for you....check out this link and let me know your thoughts.


The blades will be $10 - $15 and a single blade can cut from about a 1.5" hole up to 15" or larger. Small hole saws will still have a place but larger, very expensive, easy to ruin, tough to use ones may be, for the most part, replaced by the RECIPRO-CURVE. Also, cutting holes larger than 6" (the largest hole saw) will be possible at a whole new level. Thanks guys, I value your opinions. Let me know if you have any questions at [email protected]

Last edited by GG2; 02-15-2012 at 07:11 PM. Reason: modify title for clarity
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post #2 of 15 Old 02-15-2012, 07:15 PM
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Pretty slick
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post #3 of 15 Old 02-15-2012, 07:45 PM
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Neat idea. Target tradesmen. I can see where it would come in handy for rough plumbing and electrical conduit. Very clever. Are you going to manufacture these yourself or are you hoping an established firm will pick up your patent? In any case I wish you luck and good fortune.
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post #4 of 15 Old 02-15-2012, 07:49 PM Thread Starter
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All options are on the table, but we have a major saw blade manufacturer interested so if that works out, we'll likely take that route.
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post #5 of 15 Old 02-15-2012, 07:52 PM
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Is there a curve to go clockwise & counter clockwise?
Wait this could be johnray.

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post #6 of 15 Old 02-15-2012, 07:57 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dominick View Post
Is there a curve to go clockwise & counter clockwise?
Wait this could be johnray.
Could be or could put teeth or other cutting medium on both sides....
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post #7 of 15 Old 02-15-2012, 07:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GG2
Could be or could put teeth or other cutting medium on both sides....
Is that a yes or no?

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post #8 of 15 Old 02-15-2012, 08:04 PM Thread Starter
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We have working prototypes with teeth on each and both sides. The blades will likely come to market in several configurations. Thanks for the interest.
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post #9 of 15 Old 02-15-2012, 08:28 PM
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coming from a guy that works in the trades, I don't think this will take the place of a holesaw, since they are faster, with the drills that are used. also, when cutting holes in a stud wall, there is only 14.5" of space between studs, and a hole saw and drill are easier to use then trying to eyeball a hole with a reciprocating saw. A holesaw guides itself thru the wood, and I think that is why it is faster. I guess the only way you might be able to successfully market it, is from a safety point of view... Sometimes when a holesaw grabs, it can really twist that drill something fierce, and even hurt the operator.... A reciprocating saw would do less to hurt someone.

That being said, if you are marketing it towards the average everyday "Joe-homeowner," then I think you will do pretty good. Most homeowners that want to cut a hole DON'T want to spend the money on a hole saw, or multiple saws, and your blades would be better for them, economically speaking. They can buy a couple of your blades, and do the work of multiple holesaws, for a fraction of the price.

Either way, I think you did come up with great idea, and I wish you best of luck.

Fabian

PS, I did vote that I wouldn't buy one, only because I have a plethora of holesaw, from 3/4" to 6", so I wouldn't need one. If you came out with this years ago, when I first started, I would have jumped on it. Heck, now that I think of it, I might if I forgot my holesaws and was in a pinch, but then I would look for the most reasonable priced one, and anything more than $10 would not be reasonable priced, IMO.

Fabian

I used to be fairly indecisive, but now....... I'm not so sure.

Last edited by thegrgyle; 02-15-2012 at 08:31 PM.
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post #10 of 15 Old 02-15-2012, 08:40 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by thegrgyle View Post
coming from a guy that works in the trades, I don't think this will take the place of a holesaw, since they are faster, with the drills that are used. also, when cutting holes in a stud wall, there is only 14.5" of space between studs, and a hole saw and drill are easier to use then trying to eyeball a hole with a reciprocating saw. A holesaw guides itself thru the wood, and I think that is why it is faster. I guess the only way you might be able to successfully market it, is from a safety point of view... Sometimes when a holesaw grabs, it can really twist that drill something fierce, and even hurt the operator.... A reciprocating saw would do less to hurt someone.

That being said, if you are marketing it towards the average everyday "Joe-homeowner," then I think you will do pretty good. Most homeowners that want to cut a hole DON'T want to spend the money on a hole saw, or multiple saws, and your blades would be better for them, economically speaking. They can buy a couple of your blades, and do the work of multiple holesaws, for a fraction of the price.

Either way, I think you did come up with great idea, and I wish you best of luck.

Fabian

PS, I did vote that I wouldn't buy one, only because I have a plethora of holesaw, from 3/4" to 6", so I wouldn't need one. If you came out with this years ago, when I first started, I would have jumped on it. Heck, now that I think of it, I might if I forgot my holesaws and was in a pinch, but then I would look for the most reasonable priced one, and anything more than $10 would not be reasonable priced, IMO.
Good thoughts, thanks. I'd put this blade up against any 5 or 6 inch hole saw in a race, especially if its of particular material (metal, hard wood, hardy board, etc) or thickness (headers, multiple layers) or it has knots or nails. Also, a couple holes with that large of a hole saw is enough to nearly exhaust a battery on a cordless drill. Another major limitation to hole saws is that they only come in 6" and smaller. Until now, a clean 8 or 10 inch hole was difficult to efficiently achieve in many scenarios. I appreciate your objective perspective.

Thanks for the vote...we're still working on price points but when you add up the price of a good set of hole saws, you can get to 3 or $400 real quick. I don't think it will completely replace the hole saw, but in many cases, it would work as an equal or better alternative.

Cheers.

Last edited by GG2; 02-15-2012 at 08:43 PM.
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post #11 of 15 Old 02-15-2012, 09:19 PM
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Forstner bits or sawtooth bits work for me.
Using that curved recip you still have to make a starting hole.

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post #12 of 15 Old 02-15-2012, 09:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GG2 View Post
Good thoughts, thanks. I'd put this blade up against any 5 or 6 inch hole saw in a race, especially if its of particular material (metal, hard wood, hardy board, etc) or thickness (headers, multiple layers) or it has knots or nails. Also, a couple holes with that large of a hole saw is enough to nearly exhaust a battery on a cordless drill. Another major limitation to hole saws is that they only come in 6" and smaller. Until now, a clean 8 or 10 inch hole was difficult to efficiently achieve in many scenarios. I appreciate your objective perspective.

Thanks for the vote...we're still working on price points but when you add up the price of a good set of hole saws, you can get to 3 or $400 real quick. I don't think it will completely replace the hole saw, but in many cases, it would work as an equal or better alternative.

Cheers.
I am a little confused. A standard recip blade doesn't have any problems cutting the curves of any circle above 6" in my experience, and since that is the case, why would we need one of your blades. I think your blade would work well in smaller radius holes, and that is where the hole saw would excel.

I do hear you about the battery life, but that would probably be the case with a recip saw as well.

I also do not want to be on the end of that drill with a 10" holesaw when it bites.....

Fabian

Fabian

I used to be fairly indecisive, but now....... I'm not so sure.
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post #13 of 15 Old 02-15-2012, 09:28 PM Thread Starter
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These technologies exist to be incorporated - http://webapps.easy2.com/cm2/flash/g...ge_id=35834386 or http://www.spyderproducts.com/spyder-bore-blade/

no pilot hole required
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post #14 of 15 Old 02-15-2012, 09:31 PM Thread Starter
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The smallest diameter you can cut reasonably with a standard recip blade is about 18"....otherwise it will bind and overheat. We are going to be posting videos of standard blades failing to achieve these radii shortly. Have a good night.
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post #15 of 15 Old 02-18-2012, 01:16 AM
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I'm puzzled how you manage to keep your recip saw cutting perfectly straight up and down. I'm imagining a plate or sole like on a jig saw would be necessary (I guess I'm revealing my own ineptness in making precision cuts with a recip saw here). Also, wondering whether you'll have different radii for small vs. larger holes. It appears to do what it does very well. Like every tool I've ever seen, I suspect it won't do everything, though--like those multi size wrenches that promise "you'll never need another wrench again." Anyhow, I do think you have a good idea.
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