Quick quill stop for Jet drill press? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 27 Old 05-28-2020, 01:57 PM Thread Starter
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Quick quill stop for Jet drill press?

The quill stop nuts on my Jet JDP-17MF drill press are frustratingly slow to adjust and I'm looking for a replacement part that can be run up and down the quill quickly but that can also grip the quill threads and be accurately adjusted in fine increments - and without spending a fortune. I define "fortune" to mean more than about $75 USD.

Grizzly offers one for about fifty bucks. See attached catalog ad. It looks like what I want although I haven't checked the threads on my Jet's quill to see if it's compatible. I do note several reviews of the part that say it didn't fit their press correctly out of the box and required modification. I don't own a mill or a lathe so that sounds ominous.

Does anybody have experience with this Grizzly part - or any competitive product they could recommend? I don't have much metal-working ability but would like to hear about any alternatives.

Thanks for reading and for any advice you can give,
Bill
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post #2 of 27 Old 05-28-2020, 10:13 PM Thread Starter
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Since I wrote the initial post I've checked the thread of the Jet's quill and it is not even close to 1/2"-20 tpi. The Jet's quill has a metric thread of M16 - 2.0 and, so far as I can find, there are no aftermarket quick stops compatible with that thread.

There are several shop-built stops I've seen on the Web, all of which are of similar design: a partially split wood block drilled vertically to fit the quill and transversely with a knob-ended threaded bolt that fits a T-nut in the opposite face. The issue with these stops is they are made of wood and have to be made accordingly thick or high to withstand use without failing. This detracts from the factory drill depth of the press. (I'm not sure how big a deal that is - depends on what you use a drill press for. I may try one of these because all the pieces are on hand already.)

An alternate suggestion was made by somebody to use a Rockler or similar drill bit stop collar on the quill, although I'm not sure how well the quill threads would hold up to that sort of thing unless you were careful to always center the Allen screw of the collar on the flat side of the quill. The Jet's quill is 16mm, which is about 5/8", larger than the largest Rockler stop collar I have on hand. I'm sure somebody makes one that big.

Maybe the better thing to do is lay hands on some annealed steel bar stock, drill it for a sliding fit on the quill, through-drill it transversely on the end facing the press operator and tap it for a knob-ended threaded bolt of reasonable size to secure the stop against the flat side of the quill.

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Last edited by sonofSon; 05-28-2020 at 10:17 PM. Reason: minor grammatical corrections
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post #3 of 27 Old 05-29-2020, 06:53 AM
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For my Jet, I cut a nut apart and had it welded to a spring clamp. For your idea, a modification would be to drill out a nut, then drill and tap a hole for a set screw, cheaper starting point! You could loctite a wingnut to an extended setscrew. Frankly, I like that better than my clamp!
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post #4 of 27 Old 05-29-2020, 08:42 AM
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You have several choices ......

I can't recall the last time I used my Jet's depth stop, but that's me.

You say the thread on the Jet is a M16 X 2.0. Just get an all thread rod that matches that and several nuts as well. Cut one nut in half using a hack saw, leave the other one whole. Place the two halves in side a small length of bicycle inner tube or other elastic tubing. Spread it slightly apart enough to slide it up and down on the threaded rod as your adjustable stop. The spring clamp is a good idea also, and epoxy could be used on a plastic jaw type. Not much pressure is required to seat the nut on the threads. In fact, you could grind a flat on both sides of the rod such that a small clamp will grab it. OR drill out the nut so there are no treads left and tap it for a set screw, you don't actually need all the threads.

Another approach is to round the end of a 1/2" X 20 rod using a file or grinder just enough so it will fit inside the M16 X 2.0 hole on the Jet. Use a set screw in a tapped hole to secure it. A hole in the end that gets threaded for a small screw and when tightened it will "seat" firmly inside the hole. The Grizzly rod can be reduced in the same way so that it can then be used if you desire.

Any of these ideas can be done with simple hand tools and drilling the end of the rod for tapping can be done in this very same drill press. A 1/4" tap is cheap at any hardware store if you don't have one. Every woodworking shop would benefit from a small set of taps and dies for repairs and making jigs.

A digital version:
https://www.rockler.com/wixey-wr503-...RoCldAQAvD_BwE

Here's a nice workout for a drill press that had no previous depth stop. It has some parts made from plywood, but overall a nice job:


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

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post #5 of 27 Old 05-29-2020, 11:25 AM Thread Starter
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Gentlemen, Thanks to you both for sharing your ideas. I never ceased to be amazed at how creative woodworkers can be. In fact, even from my limited experience, I can see serious woodworkers already are or soon become skilled in other materials, to the extent the name is an understatement of the craft.

Luckily for me, Dad was a highly skilled and versatile craftsman who left me all his tap and die sets, some of which look like they could be used to build a locomotive. Probably were because he was an old railroad man who was apprenticed on the ICRR in his youth.

To get on with my honeydew list, some of which Higher Authority is on the loud pedal about, I'll probably mill a small block of oak scrap and equip it with a threaded knob/T-nut to squeeze the quill. For the time being. When I get some breathing room, I"m going to get some mild steel bar stock and see what I can do.

Go well,
Bill

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post #6 of 27 Old 05-29-2020, 03:46 PM
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I leaped into action and made a new version. As I was making it, I thought that a shaft collar is a ready made version, except for adding a thumb screw!

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post #7 of 27 Old 05-30-2020, 12:57 PM Thread Starter
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That is really slick! I just Googled "shaft collars" and it looks like Grainger, Zoro et al. can fill all my shaft collar needs, including some with set screws already installed.

One question about shaft collars: As I understand it, the decimal equivalent of 16mm is 0.6328125, the closest SAE equivalent being 5/8" (.625). Are shaft collars sized for a sliding fit on the nominal shaft? e.g. should I order a shaft set collar for a 16mm shaft or add a couple thousandths and‬ order up?

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post #8 of 27 Old 05-30-2020, 01:39 PM Thread Starter
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Here's a possibility I just found on Zoro. Would have to check and see if the 38mm O.D. will interfere with the drill press case.
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post #9 of 27 Old 05-30-2020, 04:56 PM Thread Starter
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Some measurements from the Jet JDP-17

Before ordering a shaft collar, I thought I'd better take some measurements on the Jet drill press and here's what I came up with (see attached). The sheet makes more sense with these additional notes:

The factory quill is a 16mm steel shaft threaded M16-2.0; the case of the drill press head is pretty close to the quill; there's a nut on a bolt mounted in the case, behind the quill, that closes the distance even more.

The two existing nuts and washer that are Jet's way of providing a quill stop are only 23.78mm in diameter. The quick-release 16mm shaft collar in the Zoro's catalog has a published O.D. of 38mm. So there is a real question of clearance.

The critical measurement would seem to be the narrowest distance between the outside edge of the quill and any point on the nut. With that measurement in hand, and knowing the radius of the quill and the prospective collar, what I came up with is a clearance of 0.5mm - more than a blond hair but less than a brown hair, one might say. If it came down to it, I think I could dress an interfering corner of the nut a little bit with a file, enough to allow the collar to be threaded on and used.

At this point, it looks like the only thing to think about is whether the hinged arm of the collar is going to be more trouble than it's worth: an Allen set screw might be easier to deal with, particularly with a handled wrench. In order to get a tight grip on the shaft, the locking arm might be a tough customer to snap and unsnap repeatedly with arthritic fingers. I've already got some of those and a set of handled Allen wrenches. Not to mention the difference in price. Have to think about it.

If anyone sees a flaw in my measurements or has some experience with snap-locking shaft collars, sing out and loud, before I add something to my Zoro's cart!

Bill
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post #10 of 27 Old 05-30-2020, 05:14 PM
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keep it simple .....

Just get the 16 mm shaft collar, no frills and levers, and if needed file a flat on the back side if there is an interference.

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post #11 of 27 Old 05-31-2020, 09:22 AM Thread Starter
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Agree. I ordered the plain jane 16mm steel collar with set screw. I may have to use a slightly longer set screw because the Jet's quill has a big flat on it where they've pinned the vertical scale.

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post #12 of 27 Old 05-31-2020, 11:52 AM
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setting the depth stop collar ....

Quote:
Originally Posted by sonofSon View Post
Agree. I ordered the plain jane 16mm steel collar with set screw. I may have to use a slightly longer set screw because the Jet's quill has a big flat on it where they've pinned the vertical scale.

You will need to change the way you adjust the stop with a sliding collar VS a threaded one. There is no longer a "fine tuning adjustment" so, I would run the quill/drill down to the depth I want, place a small wood block so it just fits under it and lock the quill. Then drop your sliding collar so it rests on the base of the threaded rod and tighten the set screw. Now it's at the desired depth for drilling your hole(s).

If you use two identical but opposing direction wedges they can be adjusted to make very small incremental changes in height. This is a poor man's approach, but it will work.
https://www.grizzly.com/products/Gri...BoCO-oQAvD_BwE
An adjustable height milling jack is another choice, but you can make a poor man's version using a large heavy nut and a bolt. Thread the bolt far enough into the nut so it extends to the height you want but not so it comes through the bottom. Two nuts may work better OR a block of wood with a threaded/tapped hole.


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

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post #13 of 27 Old 05-31-2020, 12:16 PM
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One thing to take into consideration when setting a stop is the backlash in the quill if you are working to close tolerances. Move the quill down to the depth required, find a block that fits between the table and tip of the bit, loosen the lock and bring the quill down to take up the slack and lock it in that position.

On my budget drill press there is a difference of about 1/16" due to the backlash,

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post #14 of 27 Old 05-31-2020, 02:47 PM Thread Starter
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No quill lock

This may be a repetitious post but the one I just submitted has disappeared. Thanks to both of you for suggesting a different technique when using a non-threaded quill stop. I've been thinking about it myself and setting to a block makes sense.

My Jet press doesn't have a quill lock so we'll have to see what works best in practice. As soon as Zoro delivers I'll report back on this thread.

Bill

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post #15 of 27 Old 05-31-2020, 03:09 PM
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No quill lock? ....!

Quote:
Originally Posted by sonofSon View Post
This may be a repetitious post but the one I just submitted has disappeared. Thanks to both of you for suggesting a different technique when using a non-threaded quill stop. I've been thinking about it myself and setting to a block makes sense.

My Jet press doesn't have a quill lock so we'll have to see what works best in practice. As soon as Zoro delivers I'll report back on this thread.

Bill
I'd be looking at a way to lock the quill, myself. One of my drill presses also lacks a quill lock and there are times I wish very badly it had one.

In your case, what comes to mind is a "snubber" on the threaded rod. It would provide enough friction to keep it from sliding when screwed in. I would remove the threaded rod and drill a 7/32" hole in the casting that supports it and then tap the hole for 1/4" x 20 threads. Then use a nylon tipped set screw or nylon thumb screw to press against the rod when tightened enough to maintain it's position. You may not need it often, but with your shaft collar addition it would be quite helpful.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #16 of 27 Old 06-01-2020, 06:34 AM
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FWIW, that's my drill, not the OP's.
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post #17 of 27 Old 06-01-2020, 12:08 PM
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I did the same thing the guy in the video did to my HF drill press. I used white oak where he used plywood. Mine broke and it's still broke.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
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post #18 of 27 Old 06-01-2020, 02:51 PM Thread Starter
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Just got word from Zoro that Big Brown should deliver the shaft collar this Friday. Don, thanks for the idea of a quill snubber. I'm already committed for at least the price of a shaft collar to stay with the factory 16mm quill, but I like the idea of immobilizing the point of the drill by clamping the quill in place, as opposed to what I thought Jet offered on some of its presses - a handle lock.

I ran across a Woodsmith plan for a quill stop that uses a second button-operated nut to freeze the quill in place. Of course it uses some wooden parts and an SAE threaded rod and other steel parts that make up an entirely new quill assembly. See attached. I'm not willing, at this point, to throw away the factory quill assembly and undertake that kind of project .... but the second nut gives me an idea of where I might put a locking collar or clamp to temporarily hold the quill steady.

Bill
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post #19 of 27 Old 06-01-2020, 03:14 PM
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Cool Want a really simple quill lock?

A hose clamp left loose on the quill won't interfere with drilling, but if you position the quill where it's down as far as needed, then tighten the hose clamp right under the quill the column, it can't go up any further. It can go down, but not up. This is quite different than a depth stop of course.

For a depth stop, use a smaller hose clamp like for fuel lines and clamp it to the existing depth stop rod where it's needed. So, now we've succeeded in limiting the upward and downward movement of the quill .... it it still a drill press?
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post #20 of 27 Old 06-01-2020, 03:29 PM Thread Starter
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Perhaps a prehensile tail would work better.

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