Precautions for powering up a left-in-the-rain motor? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 13 Old 04-18-2019, 12:16 PM Thread Starter
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Precautions for powering up a left-in-the-rain motor?

I came across a belt-drive table saw in a scrap heap. It's rusty. Even the chromed rails have rust. And the fence head casting, for one reason or another, is frozen to the front rail. I'm thinking of getting it running again, then leaving it out in the backyard under a tarp for times when that'd be a convenient location. Or less likely I might restore it.

The 110/220v motor seems fully enclosed in it's housing. I am not sure how much water got inside, if any. The shaft spins very nice. I can't think of any reason why the motor would be bad.

Is there any risk to the motor in just plugging it in? I'm not worried about popping a circuit breaker, just don't want to damage the motor.
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post #2 of 13 Old 04-18-2019, 12:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unburled View Post
I came across a belt-drive table saw in a scrap heap. It's rusty. Even the chromed rails have rust. And the fence head casting, for one reason or another, is frozen to the front rail. I'm thinking of getting it running again, then leaving it out in the backyard under a tarp for times when that'd be a convenient location. Or less likely I might restore it.



The 110/220v motor seems fully enclosed in it's housing. I am not sure how much water got inside, if any. The shaft spins very nice. I can't think of any reason why the motor would be bad.



Is there any risk to the motor in just plugging it in? I'm not worried about popping a circuit breaker, just don't want to damage the motor.
Plug it in without belts to the saw blade . Don't touch the saw as the ground may be compromised. The worst that may happen is you'll smoke the motor or pop a circut.

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post #3 of 13 Old 04-18-2019, 12:51 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks. I'm wondering what 'smoke the motor" means? Heading out to the backyard now to look at motor more closely. It's already detached from the table saw.
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post #4 of 13 Old 04-18-2019, 01:20 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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The bearings are sealed ....

I would NOT use air pressure to attempt to blow out any water because it may enter the bearings, but being sealed in the first place gives you a considerable degree of protection. Heat will dry out any moisture inside the motor and you can do that by first leaving it in the bright sunshine, and afterwards letting it run for an hour or so, but closely monitoring it.
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #5 of 13 Old 04-18-2019, 02:35 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks. I took off the fan shroud. It's sealed on that end too, so without opening it up, there are openings to blow into anyway.

The tin electrical junction box and the capacitor shroud are sealed with gaskets, with no signs inside them of moisture having entered.

I rewired it to the saw, flipped the saw switch to on, then plugged in the 110 cord. Runs great. And the blade spins freely. Neither the blade shaft nor the motor shaft have any play, to the touch.

Now I need to free the ripfence head.

One nice thing about this contractor-style saw are the two-position legs, for with and without casters. It has the old style vertical legs with splayed feet, which makes the two heights possible compared to the modern splayed legs, which i never understood anyway, just a waste of space.

I took off the casters which were clearly not original, and none of which locked. I'm thinking of mounting the base on a square of 3/4 ply, and all-terraining it using 6" or 8" diameter wheels.

Last edited by unburled; 04-18-2019 at 02:42 PM.
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post #6 of 13 Old 04-18-2019, 03:24 PM Thread Starter
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I took the fence bar off the head casting, which revealed the casting wasn't rusted on. The problem was the steel micro adjust was rusted. The microknob was press fit onto the microshaft, came off easily enough, then large vise grips on the end of the microshaft, a little wiggling, and it's free. Throat plate was corroded in place too. Height and angle adjustments are frozen, so that's next.
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post #7 of 13 Old 04-18-2019, 04:59 PM
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The motoris probably a TEFC Totally Enclosed Fan Cooled, there should be a fan under a guard opposite the shaft end, you should be alright with no water in the motor
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post #8 of 13 Old 04-18-2019, 06:04 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks. That sounds spot on. The wiki page says they are not explosion proof. Bummer.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TEFC


On other fronts, freed up the motor mount and the hight and tilt gearings. There is some whip, and there is no lock on those adjustments.

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post #9 of 13 Old 04-18-2019, 06:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unburled View Post
I came across a belt-drive table saw in a scrap heap. It's rusty. Even the chromed rails have rust. And the fence head casting, for one reason or another, is frozen to the front rail. I'm thinking of getting it running again, then leaving it out in the backyard under a tarp for times when that'd be a convenient location. Or less likely I might restore it.

The 110/220v motor seems fully enclosed in it's housing. I am not sure how much water got inside, if any. The shaft spins very nice. I can't think of any reason why the motor would be bad.

Is there any risk to the motor in just plugging it in? I'm not worried about popping a circuit breaker, just don't want to damage the motor.
Nearly 40 years ago the motor I'm currently using on my bandsaw fell in a tank of water while it was running. It continued to run under water. As quickly as I could I unplugged it and removed it from the tank and then sat it on it's end and let it dry overnight. Still works great.
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post #10 of 13 Old 04-18-2019, 07:28 PM Thread Starter
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the motor I'm currently using on my bandsaw fell in a tank of water while it was running. It continued to run under water.

Now that story deserves a thread, or a blog post.
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post #11 of 13 Old 04-18-2019, 07:33 PM
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Now that story deserves a thread, or a blog post.
Gees, I barely remember it. I probably would have completely forgotten it but I thought it was funny to see an electric motor running under water.
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post #12 of 13 Old 04-19-2019, 05:37 AM
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Submersible pumps do it.
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post #13 of 13 Old 04-25-2019, 01:15 PM
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Don't use your tongue to turn it on.
Blow it out, turn it on, thrash it.
I had a fire in my shop a few years back. Pressure washed everything, motors, etc., blew out, lubed everything (not sealed bearings obviously), no issues.
It seems scary... just don't pressure wash while it is running!! HAHAH
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