Planer Rust Removal - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 19 Old 03-30-2020, 03:06 PM Thread Starter
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Planer Rust Removal

I recently bought a used Ridgid thickness planer. It has rust inside it but I figured that I could clean it myself and save money rather than buying a new planer. Does anyone have suggestions for cleaning it up? Should I spray it with WD-40 and use a brush, remove all the parts and soak them, or something else? Images are in the "My Photos" link as well as the imgur URLs.

https://imgur.com/tdHXTVu
https://imgur.com/vhoR1si
https://imgur.com/Lity7g1
https://imgur.com/u3egPnE
https://imgur.com/cp1Np9Y

Last edited by Chris Tyree; 03-30-2020 at 03:26 PM.
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post #2 of 19 Old 03-30-2020, 03:15 PM
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Welcome to the forum, Chris! Add your location to your profile so it shows in the side panel.

You're probably going to have to upload the photos to the server here at the forum if you want people to see them. Most won't click on a link.

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post #3 of 19 Old 03-30-2020, 03:27 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks David!

I put them in the "My Photos" link on the left side. Is that what you mean?
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post #4 of 19 Old 03-30-2020, 09:21 PM
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WD-40 and a grey (IMPORTANT) scotchbrite pad will take care of that in short order. Again, use grey. Scotchbrite comes in different colors depending on the application, the green stuff is the standard scotchbrite but its too coarse and will scratch up sliding surfaces. The grey stuff is finer and a lot gentler, perfect for getting rid of rust. Its comparable to 0000 steel wool, maybe a little coarser, but it doesnt shed tiny bits of steel everywhere. Make sure that you clean everything off before reassembly, the last thing you want is something abrasive in a slideway

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post #5 of 19 Old 03-30-2020, 11:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Chris Tyree View Post
Thanks David!

I put them in the "My Photos" link on the left side. Is that what you mean?
Actually I meant to post them in this thread for reference. And I'll help you with the orientation issue - if you're using your phone then take photos widescreen rather than portrait. Rotate your phone CCW for proper orientation in widescreen/landscape.

Some will venture away from the thread to look at the photos but if they're in the thread then everything is right here without having to leave the page.

What @epicfail48 said is good advice and will probably get most of that off, btw. Be sure to update us on you progress!

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post #6 of 19 Old 03-31-2020, 07:56 AM
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Also using gray abrasive pads and WD40 for cleaning and rust removal. Learning same method epicfail48. Mineral spirits and rags for cleaning WD40 and abrasive grit when done. Gray abrasive pads small quanity high price at woodworking store. Home Depot much better. Hard finding in store. Looking in paint department, finding many but hiding on bottom shelfs.
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post #7 of 19 Old 03-31-2020, 08:00 AM
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Also important waxing or oiling coats preventing future rust when done. Very important cast iron tops, also lathe beds. Johnsons paste wax good quality good price, also at home depot.
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post #8 of 19 Old 03-31-2020, 08:46 AM
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Also important waxing or oiling coats preventing future rust when done. Very important cast iron tops, also lathe beds. Johnsons paste wax good quality good price, also at home depot.
Good note on rust protection after youve done your cleaning. Personally to flush off any abrasive nasties after cleaning, i just use more WD-40 and some clean rags, so for most parts i dont need to do anything else. The WD-40 itself does a good enough job of rust protection on its own. If you use any sort of solvent to clean your parts afterwards, you definitely need to do something to keep rust at bay, be it WD-40, paste wax or other.

Now, sliding surfaces or anything that requires lubrication i treat differently. First things first, no WD-40, its not a lubricant. For most woodshop related things, PTFE dry lube is my go-to. WD-40 brand actually makes a PTFE spray lube in their specialist line, love the stuff. Dries to a film, not sticky, doesnt attract dust at all, and its incredibly slippery. I use it on... well, pretty much anything that doesnt explicitly call for a 'wet' lube. Pocket knives, door hinges, table saw height adjustment, planer pillars, bike chains, locks, squeaky casters, metal drawer slides, etc

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post #9 of 19 Old 03-31-2020, 09:11 AM
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Loctite® Naval Jelly® Rust Dissolver
I used it not that long ago, cleaning my car jack lift. Just apply, leave for a few, wipe. May not work for vertical sliding rods, though... unless you take all apart :)
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post #10 of 19 Old 03-31-2020, 10:43 AM
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Thats some pretty serious corrosion there. On the threaded rods and the other parts you can't get to would require dismantling and a soak in Evaporust or do an electrolysis. IOW pretty much a restoration effort.

If you don't want to invest the time, I would clean up what you can, lube it up and use it.

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post #11 of 19 Old 03-31-2020, 11:43 AM Thread Starter
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@epicfail48 thank your for your advice! After removing the rust, what is the best way to seal the metal?
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post #12 of 19 Old 04-02-2020, 12:28 AM
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Your welcome.
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post #13 of 19 Old 04-02-2020, 05:40 AM
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@epicfail48 thank your for your advice! After removing the rust, what is the best way to seal the metal?
Keep something on it, as previously stated. Wax, oil, something specialized like Boeshield, lubricant where needed, etc. Depends on whats getting rust-proofed and what job its doing. If its a moving surface it needs a lubricant, surface that wood slides over needs something that wont spread, list goes on.

Important thing to note, if it wasnt painted at the factory, it shouldnt be painted

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post #14 of 19 Old 04-02-2020, 07:23 PM
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I have that same planer and like it; I think there are many identical versions of that same design out there these days for not a lot of money, as in a bit over $300. Consider that as you debate whether to attack the rust -- you have a long and laborious road ahead of you.

The only critical parts from which to really eliminate the rust pretty thoroughly are those columns, and to do those right, you'll need to disassemble the unit. The reason for this is that the rust is a very abrasive debris and the cutter head rides up and down those columns on bushings. You will not be able to remove all of the abrasive debris without disassembling the steel rods and thoroughly remove all the rust and particles leftover from your process.

As Doc noted, Evaporust or electrolysis are the 2 methods that work best, and they need to be combined with the scrubbing. Some darkening or similar staining may remain and that should be okay, but the key is that those rods are factory polished and they need to feel like it when you're done with them or them will eat up the bushings and your accuracy will be gone. That is end-of-life for such a basic and inexpensive tool, and frankly there is no guarantee that after all your restoration efforts that the tool won't be shot anyway. If you do forge ahead, I completely agree that lube and protection are critical -- Boeshield is ideal for encapsulating nasty abrasives and keeping rust away; Stick and I both feel that WD-40 is a poor rust repellant, we actually believe it accelerates rusting.

Good luck.
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post #15 of 19 Old 04-02-2020, 07:24 PM
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There are 3 chemicals that, in my opinion, every woodworker needs in his shop arsenal to combat formation, removal and prevention of rust. Automotive compounds and techniques are frequently too harsh when one is trying to manage rust on fine tools.

Please consider the "right stuff": Boeshield, a product originating with the aircraft manufacturing and maintenance industry. Boeshield T-9 provides waterproof lubrication, rust and corrosion protection (think cast table saw tops, etc.) Boeshield's "Blade & Bit" (tm) provides resin, gum and pitch removal capabilities and "Rust Free" (tm) is the go to choice for non-abrasive rust and stain removal.

Get these and don't think about applying penetrants, water repellers, your wife's scouring pads, things that contain the words, "magic" or "mystery" in their trade names (thanks,Click 'n Clack!) to fine wood working or machine surfaces.
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post #16 of 19 Old 04-03-2020, 05:18 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you for your input! Do you have any suggestions for the disassembly to prevent ruining the accuracy of it after removing the rust? I tried to find videos online for the Ridgid planer but was unsuccessful. Of course, the last thing I want to do is clean it all just to realize I screwed something up rendering it useless.
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post #17 of 19 Old 04-03-2020, 06:45 PM
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It's useless now. You have nothing to lose.

I agree on the T-9 Boeshield if you can get it, wonderful stuff.

My advice would be to not spend any time on stuff until you know for sure it needs it and that it will work enough to pay off. I've spent my fair share of Saturdays tearing down "free" equipment only to conclude it was a gonner before I saw it and that's why it was free.

Spray some lube around the moving joints and fire it up and plane some wood. plane all kinds of sizes and work all the controls from limit to limit. You'll either find what parts need attention or that it works just fine or that it isn't worth spending a whole Saturday on.
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post #18 of 19 Old 04-03-2020, 08:39 PM
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It looks like it was left outside. For quite a while.... Good luck on this one. Just remember to keep track of what goes back where and break it down...gently. Some of it looks like it will possibly be a real challenge to disassemble without damaging something. I use a brass wheel on my bench grinder for serious rust.


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post #19 of 19 Old 04-07-2020, 02:06 PM Thread Starter
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I just purchased the 3 Boeshield products that you suggested and will hopefully be able to put them to use in a week or so. Thank you for the suggestion!
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