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post #41 of 52 Old 09-22-2014, 10:54 PM Thread Starter
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I would be considered a hobbyist that would be planing oak, ash, soft maple, occasional hard maple and popular, and anything else I can get my hands on cheap. The second two we saw the boards on my grandpa's sawmill. I need it to be able to easily moved around and taken over by my grandpa's but that does not mean one person has to be able to lift it because we have a skidsteers to move it. Budget I would say 2 grand but I am willing to exceed that for a better machine. One thing that I think that it should have is a helical cutterhead so if the blade hits something hard I don't have to have all my blades resharpened.

Also I noticed a Woodcraft is close by, what are your thoughts on there sales and service, good place to do business?
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post #42 of 52 Old 09-22-2014, 11:39 PM
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I would be considered a hobbyist that would be planing oak, ash, soft maple, occasional hard maple and popular, and anything else I can get my hands on cheap. The second two we saw the boards on my grandpa's sawmill. I need it to be able to easily moved around and taken over by my grandpa's but that does not mean one person has to be able to lift it because we have a skidsteers to move it. Budget I would say 2 grand but I am willing to exceed that for a better machine. One thing that I think that it should have is a helical cutterhead so if the blade hits something hard I don't have to have all my blades resharpened.

Also I noticed a Woodcraft is close by, what are your thoughts on there sales and service, good place to do business?
You don't have to have them 'all' sharpened for a single nick or doof in the blades.

Most times you can simply fudge the blades to the left and right alternately so the 'good' portions of the one blade covers over the parts of the blades with the missing blade material.

If you got a 4 blade cutterhead you would move 3 blades either left of right a slight bit so the bad spot was not 'lined up' and you would be good to go. There is generally plenty of room in side to side blade adjustment for stuff like this. Depends on machine of course...

Same thing applies with joiner blades.

This takes very little time as compared to sending ALL the blades off to be sharpened.

Good blades cost money and each time you send them out you want to make it worth while... You cant get back material that you had ground off of them.
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post #43 of 52 Old 09-25-2014, 10:00 PM Thread Starter
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Have you seen the cover of the latest Shopnotes Magazine? Cause that looks like a pretty nice planer jig on the cover. Wish I could find the plans for free online but guess I will have to settle and find the magazine in stores. Here is a link to the cover.

http://www.shopnotes.com/
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post #44 of 52 Old 09-25-2014, 10:33 PM
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Originally Posted by fishinfiend
Have you seen the cover of the latest Shopnotes Magazine? Cause that looks like a pretty nice planer jig on the cover. Wish I could find the plans for free online but guess I will have to settle and find the magazine in stores. Here is a link to the cover.

http://www.shopnotes.com/
I can't think of a better mag for you to subscribe to. Go for it.

Did you buy a planer yet?

Al


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post #45 of 52 Old 09-26-2014, 01:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fishinfiend
I would be considered a hobbyist that would be planing oak, ash, soft maple, occasional hard maple and popular, and anything else I can get my hands on cheap. The second two we saw the boards on my grandpa's sawmill. I need it to be able to easily moved around and taken over by my grandpa's but that does not mean one person has to be able to lift it because we have a skidsteers to move it. Budget I would say 2 grand but I am willing to exceed that for a better machine. One thing that I think that it should have is a helical cutterhead so if the blade hits something hard I don't have to have all my blades resharpened. Also I noticed a Woodcraft is close by, what are your thoughts on there sales and service, good place to do business?
I bought a Steel City table top planer with the helical head from Woodcraft and really like it for my use. Only does 12" wide but I can make due.

Cut it twice, measure once and it's still too short.
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post #46 of 52 Old 09-26-2014, 08:22 PM Thread Starter
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No I did not make the purchase yet still trying to decide which one.

Also, thanks for all of the responses so far.
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post #47 of 52 Old 09-27-2014, 10:26 PM Thread Starter
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I have two new question

1 How heavy of a cut can you do on a bench vs standalone planer on oak or equivalent hardness of wood?

2 Am I better off spending less on a planer and getting a surface sander instead
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post #48 of 52 Old 09-28-2014, 12:51 AM
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Quote:
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I have two new question

1 How heavy of a cut can you do on a bench vs standalone planer on oak or equivalent hardness of wood?

2 Am I better off spending less on a planer and getting a surface sander instead
For most portable planers ive seen the max depth of cut is 1/16 to maybe 1/8 for the more powerful models. Most stationary units ive seen state the maximum depth of cut as 1/8, but id imagine you could probably push them just a little deeper. Heres a question though, why would you want to? Surface quality is going to suffer once you start taking too deep of cuts, and youll like as not be pushing the machine too hard as well. Sure, shallower cuts may take a few more passes, but youll get better results.

As far as a thickness sander vs planer goes, remember this: the stock that a thickness planer takes off is measured in fractions of an inch, a sander is measured in thousandths. Sure, you could take a rough cut 4/4 board down to a nice smooth 3/4 board with a sander, but its take forever. A thickness sander is meant for more finishing work, smoothing veneer, smoothing glued up panels in the like. Its a planers job to take rough lumber down to finished thickness

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post #49 of 52 Old 09-28-2014, 01:26 AM Thread Starter
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What I meant by how heavy of a cut, is how much can you take off before the machine starts chattering and/or stall?

Yes, I know a surface sander does not take much off in a pass (I.e. a heavy pass is 0.008 in. or approximately 1/128 in.). What I was asking was am I better off purchasing both a sander and benchtop planer over a standalone planer?
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post #50 of 52 Old 09-28-2014, 02:53 AM
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I think that really depends on what you do. Personally, im of the opinion that more machines is never a bad thing, and for most home hobbiests a portable planer is more than enough, but that answer changes situation by situation. If you deal with high volumes of wood through the planer, like you would in a production environment, run a mill, etc, a stationary model would be necessary, but overkill if you plane a few board feet a day. Like i said, personally, id go with a portable planer and a sander if i had the money, because having them both would cover a wider range of what ifs, e.g taking rough cut 8/4 stock down to 3/4 as well as smoothing homemade veneers, but im also a garage hackjob.

As far as how much a planer can take off without stalling, from my personal experience my planer will take a cut of what i estimate to be maybe 3/16 in an 8 inchish wide board and leave a pretty smooth cut, but you can hear the motor bogging down a lot. Admittedly, my planer is a decade old delta shopmaster, so my results probably arent the same as, say, a dewaly 735, but hey, my two cents and all that crap

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post #51 of 52 Old 09-29-2014, 02:48 AM
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I have two new question

1 How heavy of a cut can you do on a bench vs standalone planer on oak or equivalent hardness of wood?

2 Am I better off spending less on a planer and getting a surface sander instead
#1 Interesting question...heavy cuts tend to create a rougher finish than light cuts. If you are working with hardwoods, i.e. maple and/or oak, then you may find the wood chipping out rather than smooth cuts. Softwoods, i.e. Douglas fir, hemlock and/or poplar, may be planed with a heavy cut and have a smooth finish.

I have a Grizzly G5850Z 20" planer with four (4) knives. It has a 5hp cutter motor and a 2hp drive motor. It works great with softwoods and most hardwoods. I planed some of my figured maple with it and the finish came out very rough. Instead of hand planing the figured maple and then sanding it, I took it over to a friends wood shop. He has an 18" Woodmaster surface planer with a spiral head cutter. We ran the same pieces that I had planed on my planer on the Woodmaster. They came out very smooth. Very little sanding with a 220 grit paper was required.

So, I would be looking more for the smoothness of the finish rather than "how heavy of a cut". If you are using a spiral head cutter, you will not have to do as much sanding. You may be able to use a hand plane, card scraper or hand sanding block for the final smoothing.

I do a lot of re-sawing with my band saw. I try to get the thickness of the board within 1/4" of my final thickness. I can then remove up to 1/8" on one side of the board with my jointer and 1/8" from the opposite side with my planer. I usually do not take off more than 1/32" at a time. That calculates to about eight (8) passes total for both the jointer and planer. This creates a very smooth finish with minimal sanding. If I was to try to take off more than the 1/32" per pass, I would have to do a lot more sanding for the final smoothing.

If you are looking to save some money, you might want to check in your area for businesses that offer planing services. A few of the wood shops in Portland, Oregon offer planing services at reasonable rates.

There are a couple of schools in my area that have planers that are available to students. You could try out different planers and see what works for you.

You could also find about a Woodworkers Guild in your area. Here is a link (http://www.guildoforegonwoodworkers.com/) to one in Oregon.

#2. I would spend more money on a better planer. Every wood shop has to have a method for final smoothing of the wood. I have a couple of sanders, but I prefer to have the wood smooth before I start with a sander. A good planer is going to do that for you. Final smoothing can be done with a good hand plane, scraper or just a piece of 220 grit sandpaper on a $5 rubber sanding block. If your planer leaves a rough surface, then you are probably going to spend more time and effort sanding the board to an acceptable smooth level with a powered sander.
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post #52 of 52 Old 09-30-2014, 08:33 PM Thread Starter
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Another question, what are your thoughts on a 12 in. jointer planer like the Jet jjp12, Hammer A3 31 or the Laguna 12 in. model?
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