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fishinfiend 09-14-2014 11:15 PM

Planer Recommendations
 
I am thinking about maybe getting a planer. I would be planing anything from soft maple to ash to oak and anything else I can get my hands on. So what are your recommendations? Helix vs straight blades? Planing glue and glue joints?

Thanks for any response in advance.

fire65 09-14-2014 11:44 PM

Welcome to the forum. I guess I missed your introduction.

epicfail48 09-15-2014 04:23 AM

Need a little more to go on for a recommendation. Permanant or portable, what's your price range, what capacity were you wanting, were you anting extra feature like the ability to run moulding heads

Joeb41 09-15-2014 07:03 AM

As mentioned more info needed. If you are looking for a benchtop planer I think many will agree with me on the DeWalt 735. I have had mine since 2007 and have no problems or complaints.
To get the best info here you also must participate so lets hear about your needs.

fishinfiend 09-15-2014 10:42 PM

My grandpa owns a big circular saw sawmill and I can get my boards from him but he doesn't have a planer so all boards are rough sawed. I don't have a lot of room but don't want to have a small one that can't handle the job either. I will be taking any where from the bare minimum cut up to possibly an inch off the board. When I would get the planer there is a good chance that about 75 + percent of the boards will be planed coming of the sawmill. So I was wondering if I would be better off with the Dewalt or should I spend the extra and get a Grizzly or Jet or Powermatic (I know the local woodworking stores sell the latter 2)? Also am I better off spending the money and getting the spiral head with the planer or is the standard blades just fine?

OnealWoodworking 09-15-2014 11:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fishinfiend (Post 633175)
I am thinking about maybe getting a planer. I would be planing anything from soft maple to ash to oak and anything else I can get my hands on. So what are your recommendations? Helix vs straight blades? Planing glue and glue joints?

Thanks for any response in advance.

Straight blades. NOT Chinese blades... Pony up extra for some Japanese steel and then send those off to be cryo treated after you use them a few times.

NEVER send these blades to a 'hackjob' sharpener when they 'need' sharpening.

Always measure blades with a good quality micrometer BEFORE and AFTER you send them out to be sharpened. They should NOT be taking off very much if there were no serious defects that needed being removed. (does not hurt to let said blade sharpener SEE you actually break out the micrometer and take notes when you give him said blades)

If machine comes with poor quality blades - Save those for crap wood planning. :yes:

I tend to mark any machine I do a blade change on with the date the blades were changed on and what blades were on it. (small piece of blue tape and a sharpie work well for me)

If your machine does NOT have Quality / and/or Japanese blades available for it - Keep shopping.

epicfail48 09-16-2014 04:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fishinfiend (Post 633356)
My grandpa owns a big circular saw sawmill and I can get my boards from him but he doesn't have a planer so all boards are rough sawed. I don't have a lot of room but don't want to have a small one that can't handle the job either. I will be taking any where from the bare minimum cut up to possibly an inch off the board. When I would get the planer there is a good chance that about 75 + percent of the boards will be planed coming of the sawmill. So I was wondering if I would be better off with the Dewalt or should I spend the extra and get a Grizzly or Jet or Powermatic (I know the local woodworking stores sell the latter 2)? Also am I better off spending the money and getting the spiral head with the planer or is the standard blades just fine?

The machine selection is pretty dictated by how wide you need surface, how much money you want to spend and how much shop space you can devote it. If portability is your gane, 12.5-13 inches is a pretty sure thing for width capacity. As far as the portable unis go, theres almost no difference between them, save for the dewalts 733 and 735, which are generally considered the cream of the crop. In my admittedly limited experience, the portble units are all just fine for home shop use, provided you dont regularly thickness stock greater than 12 inches. If you do regularly surface 12+ wide boards, run in a prefessional enviroment or need more power than a lunchbox can provide, go with the stationary units. I cant make any recommendations for stationary units, but like i said, the dewalt models are generally pretty well liked for the portable units

Joeb41 09-16-2014 07:27 AM

Sounds like you have a lot of rough lumber available so you might consider something more heavy duty than a portable. How are you going to flatten the boards? Do you have a jointer? A lot to think about.

del schisler 09-16-2014 08:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fishinfiend (Post 633356)
My grandpa owns a big circular saw sawmill and I can get my boards from him but he doesn't have a planer so all boards are rough sawed. I don't have a lot of room but don't want to have a small one that can't handle the job either. I will be taking any where from the bare minimum cut up to possibly an inch off the board. When I would get the planer there is a good chance that about 75 + percent of the boards will be planed coming of the sawmill. So I was wondering if I would be better off with the Dewalt or should I spend the extra and get a Grizzly or Jet or Powermatic (I know the local woodworking stores sell the latter 2)? Also am I better off spending the money and getting the spiral head with the planer or is the standard blades just fine?

couple thing's planning green wood ? and taking off 1 inch off ? lot of waste their, any good planer will work for you , most board's should be air dried or kiln dried for best wood

Fastback 09-16-2014 08:41 AM

I have both the 12 1/2-inch bench top and larger 15-inch stationary planner. If you plan on doing a lot of rough lumber than you really need a stationary machine. You will just beat the bench top to death.

As already indicated it is important to dry the wood properly. Also, if the wood is cupped or twisted you will need a jointer to flatten one side before planning.

I can't speak for all of the stationary planers, I have a Jet 15-inch with the double edge blades. So far I have nothing but praise for the machine. The only negative is the price all most double the cost of a Grizzly. I believe that mine was just about $1,900 at the time I purchased.

Paul

OnealWoodworking 09-16-2014 08:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fastback (Post 633400)
I have both the 12 1/2-inch bench top and larger 15-inch stationary planner. If you plan on doing a lot of rough lumber than you really need a stationary machine. You will just beat the bench top to death.

As already indicated it is important to dry the wood properly. Also, if the wood is cupped or twisted you will need a jointer to flatten one side before planning.

I can't speak for all of the stationary planers, I have a Jet 15-inch with the double edge blades. So far I have nothing but praise for the machine. The only negative is the price all most double the cost of a Grizzly. I believe that mine was just about $1,900 at the time I purchased.

Paul

You can do that with the planer if you build the proper jig. It is VERY easy to 'true up' one side of a jacked up surface using only the planer and the jig is not that difficult or expensive to build.

:yes:

fishinfiend 09-16-2014 10:11 PM

First, the reason I said plane off up to an inch is because some of the boards are sawed at 2 inches and I would probably want to work with only an inch thick board.

Second, all of the boards are air dried.

Third, I don't have a jointer but if memory serves me correctly the boards are all pretty straight no bows or twists.

Finally, why do you need to joint one side of a board before planing? I was planning on just taking either a table or skil saw to true up the sides after I had the sides flat.

fishinfiend 09-16-2014 10:42 PM

Is this what you meant by jointing a warped twisted board but using a planer with a jig?

http://www.finewoodworking.com/works...ng-lumber.aspx

Also, is that how the small portable planers run? Boy it sounds like it is way under powered.

ryan50hrl 09-16-2014 10:58 PM

Really need to know more about your budget.....but if your looking around 500, the Dewalt 735X is the cream of the crop!!! I've had mine for years and have had NO reason to even consider upgrading.

http://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-DW735X-...1&keywords=735

Masterjer 09-16-2014 11:25 PM

The reason for using a jointer is so you can get one face flat. When you then move to the planer, the flat face is down and the planer cuts the opposing face so it is parallel to the flat face. If you simply run the rough board through the planer and then flip it over to plane the opposing face, the faces will be flat, but they won't be parallel to each other.

The jig mentioned earlier will allow you to get both faces parallel to each other with just the planer.

fishinfiend 09-17-2014 08:37 PM

My budget I would say is 2000 including dust collection. I do have a shop vac, will that work for dust collection on dewalt and what about 15 in planer? My budget can be exceeded if there is a better one. Does the diameter of the cutterhead make a difference?

OnealWoodworking 09-17-2014 11:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fishinfiend (Post 633540)
Is this what you meant by jointing a warped twisted board but using a planer with a jig?

http://www.finewoodworking.com/works...ng-lumber.aspx

Also, is that how the small portable planers run? Boy it sounds like it is way under powered.

Yes, That is how I do it (but not with the cool little 'adjustable' shims like that guy had in the video... THAT was cool.)

A member here WoodNThings built a much better jig for doing the same exact thing and posted about it. With the jig that WoodNThings built there is NO chance of the work piece slipping or moving around on the 'sled' or of a shim coming out of place during the milling. His jig holds / clamps the material from the sides instead of the bottom. This is a 'better' way if you have the planer capacity to cut the width you need + allow for the room taken up by the jig width.

In the video above they are supporting only from the bottom and you can milk every single bit of planer blade width out to it's full capacity as there is nothing extra on the sides of the material (holding it securely) eating up the width capacity of your blades.

Pros and cons to each method and it all depends on the material being milled and it's shape as to which method you would use.

The guy in the video DID crank down too hard on his second pass through the planer in MY opinion. The 'tool' is NOT being used correctly if the sound changes like it did in the video. That is the sound you usually hear right before the breaker trips... :yes:

epicfail48 09-18-2014 03:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fishinfiend (Post 633679)
I do have a shop vac, will that work for dust collection on dewalt and what about 15 in planer?

Speaking from experience that's a big fat nope. A shopvac generally won't move enough air to catch the shavings well, and the smaller diameter hoses clog extremely easily. I remember hearing that the dealt models actually have a decent blower system built into the dust hood, from what I've heard it does a good job of directing the sahpphavings into a bin. Again, this is secondhand information and its not true dust collection, but something to consider. With a bugpdget of two grand though, you could get a very nice planer and a very nice DC. Heck, play it right you could probably get a nice jointer too, for that budget

wericha 09-18-2014 10:03 AM

For long term reliability and durability, definitely go with a helical head. The carbide cutters are 4 sided and have exceptional longevity as long as you are mindful of your material. They are also self-indexing which eliminates time consuming setups.

I'd look for a used Jet or Powermatic. I have a very low opinion of grizzly and would not recommend anything made by them. The DeWalt 735 is also a very good machine and will serve you well. We have one for our back-up planer.

Dust collection is an absolute must, planers are one of the "dirtiest" machines in the shop. A shop vac will not keep up with a planer. I'd recommend at least a 1 1/2hp dust collector and a separator if you are planning to plane large amounts of material.

Planing glue joints is not a big problem, but I always scrape excess glue off before planing. We spend a little time inspecting material before putting it through the planer. We do a quick pass with a metal detector, wire brush it lightly if there is dirt or grit on it, and scrape excess glue from glue joints. That helps minimize knicks in the knives.

FishFactory 09-18-2014 09:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wericha (Post 633779)
For long term reliability and durability, definitely go with a helical head. The carbide cutters are 4 sided and have exceptional longevity as long as you are mindful of your material. They are also self-indexing which eliminates time consuming setups.

I'd look for a used Jet or Powermatic. I have a very low opinion of grizzly and would not recommend anything made by them. The DeWalt 735 is also a very good machine and will serve you well. We have one for our back-up planer.

Dust collection is an absolute must, planers are one of the "dirtiest" machines in the shop. A shop vac will not keep up with a planer. I'd recommend at least a 1 1/2hp dust collector and a separator if you are planning to plane large amounts of material.

Planing glue joints is not a big problem, but I always scrape excess glue off before planing. We spend a little time inspecting material before putting it through the planer. We do a quick pass with a metal detector, wire brush it lightly if there is dirt or grit on it, and scrape excess glue from glue joints. That helps minimize knicks in the knives.

Just curious why your opinion of grizzly is low. I have a cabinet saw and jointer from them and I am very impressed. In fact I think the cabinet saw is a much better machine than my fathers unifence delta. Just curious because I am about to pull the trigger on a new planer and am wondering what concerns I should have with griz. My experience with them have been great but my saw is only a year old too so its not the old ones back when they were pretty low grade.


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