OT: Circular Saw with Good Dust Collection - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 14 Old 05-14-2015, 02:35 AM Thread Starter
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OT: Circular Saw with Good Dust Collection

Anyone here know of a good circular saw that has good dust collection capability? I am thinking about one where a shop vacuum would attach to it to suck up the sawdust while sawing: at least 99% of it. Accurate, smooth cuts are also a must. About the 7.25" to 8" size, I would think.

But any suggestions are welcome. Prefer personal experience. I want to be able to work inside my garage/metal shop without spreading the sawdust all over the place or me. I want a hand held circular saw, not a table saw or a radial arm one. And under $300 please.I hope I am not dreaming.
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post #2 of 14 Old 05-14-2015, 07:55 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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consider a track saw

Most hand held circular saws do NOT have a dust port....AFAICT. They are intended for use outdoors or on a job site where dust collection is not a priority as on these:
http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=circular+saw

A track saw however, will have a dust port. Here's a few that I found in or around your budget:
http://www.grizzly.com/products/Trac...er-Pack/T25552

http://www.amazon.com/Triton-TTS1400...ords=track+saw

http://www.amazon.com/SHOP-FOX-W1835...ords=track+saw

Used:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Makita-SP600...item1c529c1a46

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #3 of 14 Old 05-14-2015, 08:04 AM
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Great advice from "woodnthings". Absolutely, a track saw would be a good choice that meets your list of saw needs. Be safe.
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post #4 of 14 Old 05-14-2015, 08:58 AM
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problem with a track saw is that you really cant freehand with them... Not sure if they even have a cut guide on the shoe, but the blade is completely enclosed. They are designed to run on the track, and thats fantastic, but replacement for an open saw, not sure?

The fact that a normal circular saw is so open so you can see the cut pretty much eliminates any hope of dust collection.
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post #5 of 14 Old 05-14-2015, 09:05 AM
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my porter cable has a chute that rotates out for a dust collection connection. I have never used it to validate its effectiveness. otherwise a very nice saw also.

your desire to get 99% is a bit lofty, I don't think you will capture 99% of the dust from any dust collected device.
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post #6 of 14 Old 05-14-2015, 12:29 PM
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You could get a bosch CS10 for $100 and then their CSDCHUTE for $15 on Amazon. I have a CS20 with that dust chute on it and it collects the dust pretty well when hooked to a shop vac.
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post #7 of 14 Old 05-14-2015, 02:01 PM
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Porter Cable used to make on that was a magnesium frame that had a dust port. I had one and it was stolen on me. I am looking for one to come up on the local craigslist. They do and I plan on replacing it then. It worked great with my Porter-Cable vac.
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post #8 of 14 Old 05-14-2015, 04:19 PM
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I have a track saw (makita) that I bought last year. Since then I haven't used my circular saw once. Not only does it cut super clean and DC is fantastic but it's also super easy to use. I can't imagine a reasonable use for a circular saw that I couldn't use the track saw for.

On the DC, I'd say it's pretty close to 99% in most cases. There is a little dust that gets out but not much. One exception, if you are trimming off something like a kerf width, DC doesn't work so well.

Last edited by PhilBa; 05-14-2015 at 04:23 PM.
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post #9 of 14 Old 05-15-2015, 04:09 AM Thread Starter
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I hadn't thought about a track saw. But they look really nice.

I am curious about making shorter cuts with them. Does the saw detach from the track for making a cross cut or is there a way of attaching the track other than the clamps at the ends?
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post #10 of 14 Old 05-15-2015, 06:54 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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here's the issue

Any circular saw ....which cuts from the top of the work, will obscure the cut, at least partially. The blade guard or the shoe will cover the line, especially on small pieces which will need to be secured against movement. The blade rotation is tending to pull the pieces up off the table at which point they may shift if the saw is not pressed down firmly.

Small pieces have no place beneath a hand held circular saw in my opinion as they won't be accurately cut and may prove dangerous if they shift.

Additionally, if you are cutting to a line, by hand without a guide, you will not get an accurate cut. If you are using a straight edge guide, as for longer cuts, you will have to measure twice, once at each end to make your cut marks. I find this a time consuming process and it may lead to non-parallel edges IF you make even the slightest error in measuring or marking.

There is a new jig, the Kreg Rip Cut, which will make parallel cuts up to 24" wide that will eliminate the double measuring:
http://www.rockler.com/kreg-rip-cut-circular-saw-guide

Overall, a handheld circular saw is more of a rough carpentry tool than a furniture or cabinet makers tool.
However, there are some builders who will swear by their track saws for cabinets or built-ins on site and that's their choice. If you have to make a dado or a rabbet on site, you'll end up with a router and edge guide because a circular saw doesn't efficiently make those cuts. However, many a stair stringer has been made entirely with a hand held on site for sure, but you won't be building furniture with one.


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #11 of 14 Old 05-15-2015, 09:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EPAIII
I hadn't thought about a track saw. But they look really nice. I am curious about making shorter cuts with them. Does the saw detach from the track for making a cross cut or is there a way of attaching the track other than the clamps at the ends?
Track saws cut much better on the track. What I would do is purchase a 24" track, which I think pretty much all track saw manufacturers offer, and use that to cross cut.

I've seen where guys don't even bother clamping the tracks to the work piece because it doesn't move much due to the rubber strips on the bottom. Short of spending $650 for a Festool MFT/3 folding table, you can rig up the shorter track like they do and leave it on a dedicated work surface for cross cutting.

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post #12 of 14 Old 05-15-2015, 11:14 AM
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The track saw clamps don't have to be on the end, they will slide into grooves on the bottom of the track and clamp on the wood regardless of the width. I have a Makita saw and have crosscut plywood as little as 14 inches wide with no issues. As was mentioned, the track is very stable, the clamps for the most part are unnecessary to keep the track from moving. The rubber on the bottom is very grippy. I bought Dewault clamps, I like those better than the Makita ones, and use them when the cut is important. Even though the track is grippy, I don't trust me....
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post #13 of 14 Old 05-15-2015, 11:30 PM
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I just purchased at Track saw with great dust collection and exceptional performance, the Mafell MT-55cc track saw:

http://www.timberwolftools.com/tools...AF-MT55cc.html

Buy once and never regret your purchase. A review if track saws is here, later this year Fine Woodworking will be doing a Track Saw review.

http://www.woodworkersjournal.com/track-saw-review/

You can buy cheaper but, you can't buy better.

Jack
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post #14 of 14 Old 05-17-2015, 06:21 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks guys! The tips are great.

As for "making furniture", my current project is some shelving. I made two sets of shelves for my home office with prefinished, particle board shelving and they look OK. They are wall mounted on one side of my desk. I want about four free standing units to match in appearance for the left corner. That may keep me in shelf space for a little while. The local lumber yard no longer stocks that prefinished shelf board, so I am making the second set of shelf units from oak plywood with oak edging strips. I have the plywood cut to the two widths I need and the edging strips glued on. I am at the point of cutting them into the sides, tops, bottoms, and shelves so it will be a bunch of crosscuts. I am tired of dragging everything out to the driveway and of all the dust in the garage, so I want a better way to make these straight cuts.

I have used a decades old, Skill, circular saw with two guides: a long, straight 1x6 (I check it before each cutting session) for ripping and a framing square with two oak 1 bys attached to the edges for crosscuts. I took extra care while making it so that square makes the most accurate 90* cuts ever. So far the results have been excellent, with my "crude carpentry" saw. I always figured the accuracy is more in the hands and mind of the workman, than in the tools.

Anyway, that's the back story. This is going to be for occasional use so I am looking for a practical solution, not a professional way that all envy. And an economical one. And I do have both a table saw and the good old Skill saw so am not worried about this being my only saw. I have many more saws, even hand saws.

I looked at many standard circular saws. The Porter Cable seemed OK, but apparently is no longer available new. I don't know if I want to take a chance on a used tool that may not be complete. Looked at the Bosch too, but am not sure how good the dust collection would be with the open side. Since dust collection is the main reason for this purchase, I don't want to compromise there.

Most of the track saws are quite expensive, $500 to $1000 and up. Grizzly and Shop Fox appear to offer the same (or very similar) saw at similar prices. I have purchased both wood and metal tools from Grizzly before and have been satisfied so I am leaning in that direction. With an extra piece of track, it looks like I could retire my 1x6 straight edge. But I think I will keep the modified framing square.

Again, thanks to all for the great advise.
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