Oscillating multi tool - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 20 Old 12-06-2015, 12:56 PM Thread Starter
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Oscillating multi tool

I was wondering if anyone can give me any information on what these tools are good for? I don't know anyone that owns one, I do know that there are a bunch of different blades available for cutting, sanding, and a multitude of different things but not sure what application they would be used in.

I have Dewalt 20 volt set of tools and I was searching the web site of the big orange store and I see that Dewalt has a 20 volt version of one of these tools and I was wondering if it would be useful to add to add to my current set of cordless tools.
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post #2 of 20 Old 12-06-2015, 01:04 PM
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I have a set of the Craftsman brand. They are a useful tool to have in your tool box. Did you ever watch the Freud commercial a few years ago? That gave a good idea of the uses.

Cutting off door jambs when raising flooring. Cutting in hard too reach locations. Especially useful cutting dry wall in place. eg installing a switch/outlet box.

You will find many more uses if you google.

This will not matter to most wood workers, but I got the most use of of my multi-tool when I was cleaning barnacles off the running gear of my boat. It also gave the tool its biggest punishment with the hard work and all of the salt water that came from the "oysters."

I could clean the struts, both props and shafts and other thru hulls in no more than an hour.

George
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post #3 of 20 Old 12-06-2015, 02:03 PM
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Multi tool

Almost every hardwood floor installer has a multi tool. The tool is capable of removing a single damaged board in a floor already laid. Prior to the Multi tool, you would do this with a hammer and chisel.
The multi tool can also work well to remove a piece in a tight spot where other tools wouldn't work.
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post #4 of 20 Old 12-06-2015, 02:44 PM
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You can replace a floor tile with ease with a multi tool.
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post #5 of 20 Old 12-06-2015, 03:18 PM Thread Starter
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If I'm understanding this correctly it really only seems to have value to a contractor or if you are remodeling a house?
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post #6 of 20 Old 12-06-2015, 03:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dirty-curty View Post
If I'm understanding this correctly it really only seems to have value to a contractor or if you are remodeling a house?
I agree to above, but the price continues to fall and I'm sure many DIYers are buying these tools.
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post #7 of 20 Old 12-06-2015, 03:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dirty-curty View Post
If I'm understanding this correctly it really only seems to have value to a contractor or if you are remodeling a house?
No, not true. I am not a contractor and I have had much use.

If you had "ggogled" you would have found information like

THIS

George

PS, they have not been expensive for several years.
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post #8 of 20 Old 12-06-2015, 03:49 PM
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They have a gazillion uses. I want one just for stuff that I can't get a sawzall or hand saw into. They're definitely not a woodworking tool, the only wood-worky thing they do is sand, and I've been told they suck at that.

I hate signatures.
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post #9 of 20 Old 12-06-2015, 04:13 PM
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I have used it to cut holes in sheetrock for new electrical boxes.
When installing base cabinets, I use it to cut the base board trim vertically. Makes a perfect fit for the cabinet. A little caulk and it's a done deal.

BTW, DeWalt is discounting their tools. $25 off $100 purchase. Amazon and CPO Tools are two of the places you can get the discount. You might have to add another DW tool or hardware to make the purchase slightly over $100, but it will end up being about $75 or slightly more. Discount is automatically applied at checkout - no rebate!
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post #10 of 20 Old 12-06-2015, 05:10 PM
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I've had one for 8+/- years. Used it 4 times. Came in very handy when I used it.

I wouldn't buy a cordless one. For the rare time I need it, hauling out a cord is no problem. Plus, when you need it, the battery will be dead! How much are new batteries?
Maybe gamble on a HF one and figure it should last at least thru the first use.

The need to have everything cordless is crazy to me.
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post #11 of 20 Old 12-06-2015, 06:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman50
Almost every hardwood floor installer has a multi tool. The tool is capable of removing a single damaged board in a floor already laid. Prior to the Multi tool, you would do this with a hammer and chisel. The multi tool can also work well to remove a piece in a tight spot where other tools wouldn't work.
Why can't a circular saw do the same thing?
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post #12 of 20 Old 12-06-2015, 06:25 PM
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Originally Posted by hwebb99 View Post
Why can't a circular saw do the same thing?
A circular saw can be used away from a wall, but the multi tool can get in a tight spot, right up next to a wall. The multi is easier to control than the circular saw ( by a pro).
Plus as someone has already pointed out, it can be used to install outlet or switch openings and is a good tool for someone doing the final punch out in a house.
I think the original Fein brand was nearly $400. Now I find knock-offs for as little as $39.
They are used for wood, metal and masonry jobs.
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post #13 of 20 Old 12-06-2015, 06:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hwebb99 View Post
Why can't a circular saw do the same thing?
It can, but the OMT is a bit more versatile to use right at the work area.
If I'm replacing a piece of flooring I'll cut a length wise section out with my track saw (one extra tool, not necessary but it's how I work) , then finish the cut to the ends with the multi tool. I'll use the OMT to rip the tongue off before installation as well. All done in place, no running around.

On topic : I can't think of any great reason to have an OMT for woodworking, but they are useful for paint stripping in corners (triangular sanding pad with 80 grit) on furniture.
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post #14 of 20 Old 12-06-2015, 09:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman50
A circular saw can be used away from a wall, but the multi tool can get in a tight spot, right up next to a wall. The multi is easier to control than the circular saw ( by a pro). Plus as someone has already pointed out, it can be used to install outlet or switch openings and is a good tool for someone doing the final punch out in a house. I think the original Fein brand was nearly $400. Now I find knock-offs for as little as $39. They are used for wood, metal and masonry jobs.
If it was that close to the wall it wouldn't be very hard and better to take up a couple of boards and fix it right.
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post #15 of 20 Old 12-07-2015, 06:37 AM
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My son used his Fein to cut a pipe to enable tap removal in the 4" space between the bath and wall.
He also used to do some trim work on my green house.
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post #16 of 20 Old 12-07-2015, 07:12 AM
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Disagree on not buying cordless. I have never had a corded model, but my intuition tells me that in the tight spaces this tool is often used that the cord would get in the way .

I have never had a battery problem because I have 3 tools that use the same battery.

George
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post #17 of 20 Old 12-07-2015, 10:33 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you for everyone's input but from what I'm reading here and on Google,I just don't see a reason for me to use or own one just yet.
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post #18 of 20 Old 12-07-2015, 11:27 AM
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I got an el cheapo rockwell that I used for typical contractor-like jobs. They don't really belong in the shop, but they're handy all the same. The rockwell imitation one was only like $20, and it's served me pretty well.

It also doubles as a tiny random orbit sander for smaller spaces, etc.
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post #19 of 20 Old 12-07-2015, 08:09 PM
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Like you said earlier Dirty it's a contractor or DIY homeowner tool. That being said and as many others have mentioned they have a ton of uses.

I've had my corded non-VS HF $18.95 model for several years and use it somewhat regularly being in construction. The thing I hate the most is how expensive the blades are.
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post #20 of 20 Old 12-07-2015, 09:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
Disagree on not buying cordless. I have never had a corded model, but my intuition tells me that in the tight spaces this tool is often used that the cord would get in the way .

I have never had a battery problem because I have 3 tools that use the same battery.

George

Can't imagine a job where the cord would be a problem.
With the ability to put the blades on in many positions, even if you were, lets say cutting a stud off, and the next stud would not allow a corded one to fit, just angle the blade.

I would like to hear if anyone has not been able to make a cut, because of the cord.

Maybe you should buy the shortest one out there.

Cordless would come in real handy if you used it in a trade where you had to use it, in attic's, crawl spaces, etc. And then I wouldn't buy the cheapest HF one, just because it was an inch shorter.

One case, where, I don't think, size matters.
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