One Inch Dado Cut - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 24 Old 07-15-2020, 04:58 PM Thread Starter
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One Inch Dado Cut

Surprisingly, in all my years of woodworking, I have never had a dado set.
I just "made do" by either hand cutting or multiple cuts on my table saw.
Now an upcoming project requires me to get one and the dado has to be precise.
I got an Oshlun 6set for my Ridgid R4513 portable table saw.

My question is I need to make a 1 wide dado (1.5 deep). This set only
goes to a width of 9/32. Would I make a 0.75 cut then and additional
0.25 cut? My only concern with doing it this way is I could run the risk of
making the dado too wide if my cut is not right on.

Does anyone have a better way to do this?
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post #2 of 24 Old 07-15-2020, 05:04 PM
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if you could expand a little on your project - - -
how wide is the material and how many cuts will you have to make.
a sketch or drawing would be nice also (to put us on the same page as you).
(I had a similar situation several years ago where the dado blade was not
the tool for the job. I used a hand-held router in a jig to cut the dados).

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post #3 of 24 Old 07-15-2020, 05:22 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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You have two issues here .....

One issue is the depth of the dado at 1 1/2". I don't know if a 6" diameter dado will cut that deep, you'll have to experiment. The other issue is your dado set will not make the dado in one pass even if it did cut to a depoth of 1.5 " which you wouldn't make in one pass regardless..... too much material to remove all at once.

How many of these are required? That will determine how you do it. If it were me, and I only needed one such dado, I might use a circular saw with a straight edge guide for the first two cuts which would determine the width. Then a router with the same guide could waste out the material between the two saw kerfs. You will find that unless your router is on a track and can not deviate from perfectly straight, you won't get a good cut.

Wood Whisperer has a jig for making perfect width dados:

Another good method:
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 07-15-2020 at 07:41 PM.
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post #4 of 24 Old 07-15-2020, 06:00 PM
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I would start by cutting from the center and work outward till I get the width I need. You'll just sneak up on the desired width....
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post #5 of 24 Old 07-15-2020, 06:30 PM
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this is the (expensive) cat's meow:
https://www.rockler.com/rockler-perf...ntractor-clamp

the jig has two (adjustable) overlapping plates, so the router is "mounted" off-center.
both 'edges' fit/slide in the clamp - so first cut using edge/distance 1, rotate jig, second cut using edge/distance 2.

any width you want . . .


regardless - that depth will require multiple passes - for one off, you can hog out the bulk of material with multiple circular/table saw cuts, then do the final width depth with the router.


I did rafts of dados for some plywood builds - plywood is always that silly half millimeter off dimensions....
the jig made it easy - and exactly repeatable. set it up on scraps and your good to go.
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post #6 of 24 Old 07-15-2020, 07:50 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the suggestions, much appreciated

I should have mentioned that I'm making an iPhone/iPad stand (see attached).
I need to make the 1" dado cut on the "foot" piece.

I made a couple test pieces by cutting the notches with my scroll saw but they required
filing, the fit wasn't exact the interior corners weren't a clean 90 degrees. That's why
I'd like to use a dado set.
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post #7 of 24 Old 07-15-2020, 08:00 PM
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are you making just one of these ??
what kind of wood will you be using ?
I would think that the scroll saw would be ideal
if you cut inside the lines then hand filed to fit.

.

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Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 07-15-2020 at 08:04 PM.
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post #8 of 24 Old 07-15-2020, 08:01 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Well now ......

Quote:
Originally Posted by ppd417 View Post
Thanks for the suggestions, much appreciated

I should have mentioned that I'm making an iPhone/iPad stand (see attached).
I need to make the 1" dado cut on the "foot" piece.
That's not really a dado, it's not long enough to qualify for that term. JMO.

It's more like a slot than anything else, and so that's where you should use a dovetail handsaw or a back saw, or a Japanese pull saw. Mark your width and scribe the lines with a sharp blade to shear the fibers. Then saw close to the lines and pare to them with a sharp chisel. If hand tools "scare" you, just use the miter gauge with an extended fence on the table saw with the blade raised to 1 1/2" and nibble away the waste between your marked lines.

Nothing like a sketch to get us all on the same page...... just sayin'

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #9 of 24 Old 07-15-2020, 09:15 PM Thread Starter
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You are correct, it's more of a notch and it isn't exactly a dado, sorry for my wrong interpretation of the cut.
I'll be making a bunch of these to give to family and friends. The two test pieces I made were from some
scrap oak. When I finally get the process down, I'll probably use pine or alder.

Again, appreciate the suggestions...many thanks guys!
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post #10 of 24 Old 07-15-2020, 09:27 PM
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Youve got 2 problems, the width and the depth. Trying to cut a 1 inch wide, 1.5 inch deep dado/slot/who cares is going to tax any saw, never mind the fact that most saws wont even accept a stack that wide. Your best bet to go at it with a 1/2" stack, making the necessary cuts to bring it to width and incrementing the depth so you dont overtax the saw.

Scratch that, your best bet is to use a bandsaw to cut the sides and clear out most of the waste, then use a chisel to clean up the end grain of the slot. Safer too
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post #11 of 24 Old 07-15-2020, 09:38 PM
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It's not a dado!

It's a notch in 3/4" thick wood. It will NOT tax any saw. Here's the illustration recently provided:


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #12 of 24 Old 07-16-2020, 02:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
It's a notch in 3/4" thick wood. It will NOT tax any saw. Here's the illustration recently provided:

Yeah, that'd be why I put "dado/notch/who cares", don't get your knickers in a twist. Show me a saw that can make a 1 inch wide, 1.5 inch deep cut through hardwood without bogging down, needing a glacial feedrate or overtaxing the arbor bearings because most saws aren't meant to spin a 1 inch dado stack

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post #13 of 24 Old 07-16-2020, 08:38 AM
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I would use a kerf maker, and use a sharp rip blade to make precise flat bottom tight fitting joints on that project. There are many videos about how to make and use a kerf maker.

Gary

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post #14 of 24 Old 07-16-2020, 09:50 AM
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Technically they are not dados, they are notches, similar to making a lap joint.

It can be done, using a miter gauge with a fence that backs up the cut.

Mark it out with a knife, saw to the line. Use a stop block. Clamp piece to miter fence.

Personally, I think it is much safer and easier to saw the notches by hand. Saw about 1/32" away from line, use a chisel to pare to the line. By the time you fix up a jig, you can have them cut!

Robert
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post #15 of 24 Old 07-16-2020, 10:06 AM
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A dado is a dado.Looks nothing like a lap joint too me. If you called it a lap joint in the shop to another professional I would be confused...

You say technically but similiar...confusing...

In the residential cabinets we call it dado.
In the commercial shops we call it dado
In the furniture shops we call it dado..
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post #16 of 24 Old 07-16-2020, 10:38 AM
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personally, i would:
stack several together to minimze tearout
cut the 2 sides/shoulders of the dado on a table saw (there is your accuracy)
remove the remaining inside waste with a dado set up. in 2 passes to depth.
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post #17 of 24 Old 07-16-2020, 11:08 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks all for the suggestions, very much appreciated and sorry for the typo in my original post, the Oshlun goes to 29/32 NOT 9/32.

Ive got some experimenting to do to see if I can get this process down. Ill give these a go tomorrow and let you guys know the results.
Another option I was thinking of is, would it possible to lay the piece flat and cut the 1.5 notch or would that be a no no with a dado?
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post #18 of 24 Old 07-16-2020, 11:44 AM
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How wide can you go?

I own dado sets in 3 1/2", 6", 8" and 10" diameters as well as several wobble type dados. The 6" and 8" have a 5/8" bore for standard 10" table saw arbors. The 10" stack has a 1" bore for use on a 12" tablesaw like my Powermatic 68 with a 5 HP motor. I've never had occasion to use it however and it was a gift from a good friend because his saw wasn't large enough, so, no loss financially.

I did some searching and found this set in a 10" stack and with a 5/8" arbor. The product details say "additional chippers can be added to increase the dado's width from 13/16" to ....."
https://www.amazon.com/Amana-Tool-65...ag=googhydr-20
However, the price will scare you at $492.72 but shipping is free...

I don't see anyone here buying one, so a warning about checking the length of your arbor is necessary, but that would be a good idea.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 07-16-2020 at 12:02 PM.
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post #19 of 24 Old 07-16-2020, 12:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ppd417 View Post
Another option I was thinking of is, would it possible to lay the piece flat and cut the 1.5 notch or would that be a no no with a dado?
it would result in a dado with a curved bottom, rather than a square one
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post #20 of 24 Old 07-16-2020, 01:13 PM
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Since I have one, I'd use a mortise cutter on my drill press to square cut the depth and cut the sides with my bandsaw.

Or, if you cut straight in to the depth on both sides, then re-cut a curve to the opposite corners on both sides, you are left with a small triangle point that's fairly easy to cut off, if you are using a narrow blade, especially. I used to make a easy-to-assemble, portable clothes rack with similar notches, and that's what I did to deal with it.
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