New Toy - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 12 Old 03-01-2010, 10:51 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
JohnK007's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Downers Grove, Illinois
Posts: 1,524
View JohnK007's Photo Album My Photos
New Toy

Got up around 4:30 Saturday morning and headed out to an auction in Fort Wayne Indiana about 200 miles away. The auction started at 9:00 am Eastern time (I live in Central time) and was advertised as a pretty good size tool auction. In the auctioneers brochure was a particular machine which I have been hunting for a couple of years. Figured now was the time to act. My quarry was a Rockwell Delta Uniplane (Model 22-300). This auction advertised two of them in addition to a lot of other machinery.

Got to Ft. Wayne a little after 9:00 and the auction was in progress. A lot more people were there than I expected. After registering I tracked down the two Uniplanes against a wall alongside a couple of Delta scroll saws, an old Craftsman TS, a Delta shaper, four nice Powermatic lathes, and a huge 24" Powermatic planer plus several other pieces. A quick look at the Uniplanes showed them to be intact. These machines were part of a school shop program that shutdown, I assume locally. It's a shame but more and more schools are terminating their shop programs. Don't know if it's due to lack of interest on the part of the students or liability fears by the school boards. Probably a little of both.

The auctioneer soon made his way to this part of the room and the bidding got started on the Uniplanes. There wasn't much interest from the crowd in these machines and it turned out there was one other guy besides myself bidding on them. He won the first one at $140 and I won the second for an even $100. Seems there was more interest in the various power hand tools than the stationary machines, which suited me fine. I watched the Powermatic lathes each go for $140, the old TS for $25!!! and both Delta scroll saws went for $40 each! Definitely some bargains to be had. But all I was really after was my Uniplane which I got for 1/3 of what I came there ready to spend for it.

I got it loaded up, helped a couple of folks load their plunder, BS'd with some very friendly and nice people for a spell, and was on my way back to Illinois by 11:00. Here are some pics of my new toy:



The thing that makes the Uniplane unique is it's vertical rotary cutterhead

The bed needs a good cleaning and some wax. It snowed part of the way home.

It came with a 3/4HP 3ph motor. I replaced it with a 1.5 HP single phase this afternoon.


A rather blurry shot of the name plate. Model number is 22-300.

Hope you enjoyed my saga. It was a fun trip and I'm looking forward to putting my new toy to use.

John
JohnK007 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 12 Old 03-01-2010, 11:17 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 868
View Colt W. Knight's Photo Album My Photos
What do you find appealing about this machine? How does it compare to a conventional jointer or planer?
Colt W. Knight is offline  
post #3 of 12 Old 03-02-2010, 06:39 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
JohnK007's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Downers Grove, Illinois
Posts: 1,524
View JohnK007's Photo Album My Photos
Two things I find appealing about it. First, I can use it to joint or surface much smaller pieces than I feel comfortable with using my jointer or planer. Since I've been getting into toy-making lately this will come in handy. Secondly I like the fact that it surfaces end as well. Grain direction is irrelevant with a Uniplane. Again, this should come in handy.

This isn't an everyday machine and I still have my jointer and planer. I don't see it replacing either. It's just something I've wanted for a long time. I first used one back in the late 60's when I had to take shop class in school. I'm going to play around with it for awhile and do a more in depth write up about it's uses when I get a chance.
JohnK007 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 12 Old 03-02-2010, 11:45 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 868
View Colt W. Knight's Photo Album My Photos
Sounds like a cool machine. Would be good for jewelry boxes.
Colt W. Knight is offline  
post #5 of 12 Old 03-03-2010, 08:23 AM
Journeyman Wood Butcher
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Central Illinois
Posts: 792
View smitty1967's Photo Album My Photos
whoa! we had one of those in my Industrial Arts class shop...back in the day. What a treat....extremely useful for making perfect octagon legs, or knocking off the corners for turning.

nice find John

smitty
smitty1967 is offline  
post #6 of 12 Old 03-03-2010, 09:32 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 868
View Colt W. Knight's Photo Album My Photos
How do you sharpen the cutterhead ?
Colt W. Knight is offline  
post #7 of 12 Old 03-04-2010, 12:15 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
JohnK007's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Downers Grove, Illinois
Posts: 1,524
View JohnK007's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colt W. Knight View Post
How do you sharpen the cutterhead ?
Well Colt herein lies the Achilles Heel of the Uniplane. If you look closely at the cutter head you'll notice 8 separate cutters. Four are ground into a triangular shape and are the rough cutters. The other four have a curve and are the finishing cutters. Both can be honed although I don't have a rounded stone to fit the profile of the curved ones; at least not yet. The Achilles Heel part is replacement cutters. They can be difficult to find but are available. But that makes them expensive. I found a source that wants $120 for a complete set. That's more than I paid for the planer. But when the time comes to replace them I'll have to pony up. I haven't used it enough to determine the sharpness of the current cutters so I'm hoping I can get some more miles out of them. They seem sharp enough to the touch.
JohnK007 is offline  
post #8 of 12 Old 01-07-2018, 09:55 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 1
View spotydog's Photo Album My Photos
JohnK - I recently also just purchased one of these and will also need to replace the motor - I cannot seem to get the pictures of your motor to come up and the designation 56Y-4 seems to be unobtanium. Could you post me a picture of the motor you replaced it with, or the data plate? Thanks in advance -

Scott Rapier
spotydog is offline  
post #9 of 12 Old 01-07-2018, 11:52 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnK007 View Post
Two things I find appealing about it. First, I can use it to joint or surface much smaller pieces than I feel comfortable with using my jointer or planer. Since I've been getting into toy-making lately this will come in handy. Secondly I like the fact that it surfaces end as well. Grain direction is irrelevant with a Uniplane. Again, this should come in handy.

This isn't an everyday machine and I still have my jointer and planer. I don't see it replacing either. It's just something I've wanted for a long time. I first used one back in the late 60's when I had to take shop class in school. I'm going to play around with it for awhile and do a more in depth write up about it's uses when I get a chance.
I had just posted about wanting a Uniplane this past week. Good for you that you found a good machine at a great price. The Uniplane can trim end grain and small pieces you canít run across a jointer or through a regular planer. For toy making I think you will really like it.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
Toolman50 is offline  
post #10 of 12 Old 01-07-2018, 12:03 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnK007 View Post
Well Colt herein lies the Achilles Heel of the Uniplane. If you look closely at the cutter head you'll notice 8 separate cutters. Four are ground into a triangular shape and are the rough cutters. The other four have a curve and are the finishing cutters. Both can be honed although I don't have a rounded stone to fit the profile of the curved ones; at least not yet. The Achilles Heel part is replacement cutters. They can be difficult to find but are available. But that makes them expensive. I found a source that wants $120 for a complete set. That's more than I paid for the planer. But when the time comes to replace them I'll have to pony up. I haven't used it enough to determine the sharpness of the current cutters so I'm hoping I can get some more miles out of them. They seem sharp enough to the touch.
Coming from a school shop, the cutters will most likely be dull, but they should be carbide and once sharpened or replaced should give you many years use. Re-setting the cutters might be difficult because it needs to be set on the money. A dial indicator would be useful to set the cutters.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
Toolman50 is offline  
post #11 of 12 Old 01-07-2018, 12:05 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
Once again, I responded to a post thatís nearly 8 years old. Aaarrgh!

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
Toolman50 is offline  
post #12 of 12 Old 01-07-2018, 01:08 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 5,658
View FrankC's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman50 View Post
Once again, I responded to a post thatís nearly 8 years old. Aaarrgh!
Look at it this way, not knowing the machine your response means as much to me, and may more of us, today as it would have 8 years ago.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

FrankC
http://sawdustmaking.com
http://woodworkerglossary.com
FrankC is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to FrankC For This Useful Post:
Toolman50 (01-07-2018)
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome