Which new tools should I buy? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 19 Old 07-22-2020, 12:24 AM Thread Starter
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Which new tools should I buy?

Ok, so I'm probably gonna buy a table saw first but would like some opinions and recommendations. I'm moving for my job and have sold my house (close in a few days) and will make a decent profit from it. Due to some unforeseen issues, closing on my new property could take a few months longer than expected. So while I annoy my gf at her home for the time being, I decided to start shopping for new tools. I retired my ryobi table saw after 15 years and sold one of my cars and a few other things I didn't want to move.

I don't have a planar or jointer either. Even though I technically know the difference in what they do, I can't seem to grasp how they do it functionally. To me it just seems like one is the same as the other just upside down, so how does it not just do the exact same thing?

Of course cheaper is always preferred, I'm willing to spend up to $2k for all 3 tools. It's not my profession, just a hobby. I suppose I'd like a band saw and/or scroll saw too eventually. Maybe I should've titled this thread "making new shop, need everything!" I'm in no rush to buy, and depending on the size of the table saw I'll likely wait until I'm in my new place first so I only have to move it once.

As for what I plan to do with it all? The new house is in need of some updating, I may be looking at building my own cabinets. I'd also like to get into building guitars some day (been saying that for 20 years)
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post #2 of 19 Old 07-22-2020, 12:35 AM
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For those tools...I prefer the old cast iron stuff. If you want new, grizzly tools give excellent performance for the price. How much space are you planning to have for a shop? Do these tools need to be mobile?
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post #3 of 19 Old 07-22-2020, 06:38 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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Jointer VS thickness planer operation ....

OK, both have spinning cutterheads and tables, but the similarities ends there. To use the jointer YOU place the workpiece on top of the table and cutterhead and move it forward while YOU press down at the same time. YOU are the "power" feed.
On a thickness planer, you place the workpiece on the table between the upper feed rollers and the cutterhead and it feeds itself. The workpiece comes out a uniform thickness, unlike a jointer which just planes off the bottom surface with no control over the thickness. The jointer is like a hand plane with a motor. The thickness planer is like a an old style washing machine clothes wringer which squeezes the material between the rollers.
Old cast iron is best. New cast iron is fine, just shinyer.
In order of importance and safety:
Table saw
Jointer
Thickness planer
Bandsaw
Dust collection
Work bench
Clamps or vise
Hand power tools, circular saw, battery drill, impact driver

Do not use crooked or warped wood on the table saw! It will twist and bind the blade and kickback at you causing an injury. Square it up and straighten it on the joiner first. The jointer and thickness planer are a team and work together to make boards straight, flat and a uniform thickness. This makes sawing them safer and easier.

A bandsaw is one of the most underrated woodworking machines out there, BUT it is one of the most useful. It makes ripping rough boards to a given dimension much safer than a table saw. Then follow up with the jointer and thickness planer. Of course it will cut curves but it does really well cutting straight lines using the fence also. Good blades are a must.


Good blades are also a must on the table saw. One blade does not always work for both ripping and crosscutting, but a 40 or 50 tooth blade comes pretty close.
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #4 of 19 Old 07-22-2020, 09:04 AM
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I saw your post last night, but @woodnthings beat me to the response. His response is very good, but I would prefer a planer over a jointer. I was also going to recommend a bandsaw as a versatile tool.

I own a planer and would love to get a jointer once I clear out more space in the garage. I have had a jointer in the past. I think that for most woodworkers on a budget, the planer should come first. Read on to see why.

A jointer does two essential woodworking jobs:

* Flattens one side of a board.
The board must be narrow enough to fit on the jointer. Consumer jointers are usually 6 inches wide, the expensive ones are 8 inches wide.
Note: The board will be flat on one side, but the other side may not be parallel to the newly flattened side. Even if you use the jointer to flatten the other side, you may still have a wedge-shape board with two flat sides, not parallel to each other.

* Puts a straight edge on a board that is perfectly square (90 degrees) to the flat side you hold against the fence.
Note: The edge will be perfectly straight and square to the flat side, but the other edge may not be parallel to the newly jointed edge. Even if you use the same flat side against the fence to joint the second edge, the two edges may form a wedge shape between each other.

A planer does two essential woodworking jobs:

* Flattens the top side of a board so that it is parallel to the flat bottom side. Consumer planers are usually 12 inches wide or a slightly wider.
Note: If the bottom side of the board is NOT flat, then the board will move and flex under the force of the planer as it goes through. The top side will not be flat. It will be more-or-less parallel (cups, twists, and all) to the bottom side. In general, you should start with a flat bottom side that you created in the jointer first.

* Makes the board thinner.
If you need a thinner board, a planer is the fastest way to do a nice clean job of it.
Note: You can waste a lot of good wood that way. If you have a bandsaw, it may pay to resaw the board first.

* (Bonus): Clean up re-sawn boards.
If you resaw a board into thinner boards on a bandsaw, a planer can quickly clean off the saw marks.

If you own a jointer and a planer, the best procedure to prepare a board is:

1. Flatten one side on the jointer. The board is now "surfaced one side" (S1S).
2. Flatten the other side in the planer so that the two sides are flat and parallel. The board is now "surfaced two sides" (S2S)
3. Joint one edge on the jointer using either face on the fence. The board is now surfaced three sides (S3S).
4. (Table Saw): Using the jointed edge against the rip fence, cut the other edge on the table saw so that it is parallel to the jointed edge. The board is now "surfaced four sides" (S4S)

Note: Some woodworkers prefer to reverse the order of steps 2 and 3. If you do that, be sure the flat, jointed side is used against the fence when jointing the first edge.

How I get by with a planer and no jointer:

* I made a planer sled. I place wedges and shims under the board to prevent the planer from moving and flexing the board as it passes under the cutting heads. This allows me to flatten one side of my board, just like step 1 in the procedure above to yield S1S. An added bonus is that the planner can flatten wider boards than a typical jointer. After that, I can remove the board from the sled and use the planer to flatten the other side of the board parallel to the first side to yield S2S.

* I use a jointer sled for my table saw. I mount the board to the jointer sled so that one side sticks out for the blade to cut. The straight edge on the sled is against the rip fence, and the table saw cuts the board edge so that it is straight and square (S3S). After that, I can remove the board from the sled and put the new board edge against the fence to make the final edge as in step 4 above (S4S).

Bandsaw:

In addition to the above, I would like to echo @woodnthings' comment that a bandsaw is one of the most underappreciated tools in a shop. It can resaw boards into multiple thinner boards, up to veneer. It can cut curves. It can cut thick boards that are too thick for a table saw. With appropriate sleds, clamps, and supports, it can cut logs into boards . It can make 1000 quick, easy, convenient cuts for all purposes.
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post #5 of 19 Old 07-22-2020, 09:23 AM
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Or just buy good wood and you won't need a jointer...
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post #6 of 19 Old 07-22-2020, 11:39 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
How much space are you planning to have for a shop? Do these tools need to be mobile?
My new place will have a small barn, roughly the size of a 2-car garage plus a loft above. It's on a concrete slab and has power. Don't know if it's supplied with 220v or not, but adding is not a big deal.
I'd prefer something that doesn't require to be bolted down but doesn't necessarily have to be "mobile".


Quote:
Do not use crooked or warped wood on the table saw!
Good tip, never really having used raw cuts before I hadn't considered that.
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post #7 of 19 Old 07-22-2020, 04:24 PM
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don't build kitchen cabinets, buy Schuler Cabinets from Lowes and install them yourself. Work withthe Lowes salesperson and thier CAD program to design the layout. Allow yourself a couple of design cycles.

We are very happy with out decision to go this route.

If you have a peninsula put 24" cabinets one side and 12" cabinets the other side for best storage.
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Retired engineer-bureaucrat in Oakland, CA. Been working with wood since the 1960's. From the 50's if you count the scrap woodpile on the farm!
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post #8 of 19 Old 07-22-2020, 04:25 PM
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and with all your left over energy - build a decent pantry the same way (with lots of slide out drawers)
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Retired engineer-bureaucrat in Oakland, CA. Been working with wood since the 1960's. From the 50's if you count the scrap woodpile on the farm!
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post #9 of 19 Old 07-23-2020, 09:50 AM Thread Starter
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Found this Grizzly:
https://www.grizzly.com/products/Gri...d-Fence/G0771Z


Any opinions about Laguna?
https://www.rockler.com/laguna-fusion-f1-table-saw

I think I'm leaning towards the Grizzly; larger motor and rip capacity.

Last edited by phaelax; 07-23-2020 at 10:00 AM.
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post #10 of 19 Old 07-23-2020, 09:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwi_outdoors View Post
don't build kitchen cabinets, buy Schuler Cabinets from Lowes and install them yourself. Work withthe Lowes salesperson and thier CAD program to design the layout. Allow yourself a couple of design cycles.

We are very happy with out decision to go this route.

If you have a peninsula put 24" cabinets one side and 12" cabinets the other side for best storage.
If your doing it for a hobby why would you pass?
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post #11 of 19 Old 07-23-2020, 10:08 AM Thread Starter
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The cabinets I want to build would be for the workshop, because I'd have less time constraints. For the kitchen, I'll get prebuilt because it'll save me a ton of time and I don't want to go weeks without a kitchen. There's also some built-ins I want to do around the fireplaces.
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post #12 of 19 Old 07-23-2020, 10:12 AM Thread Starter
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Here's what's to hopefully be my workshop soon.
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post #13 of 19 Old 07-23-2020, 10:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phaelax View Post
Found this Grizzly:
https://www.grizzly.com/products/Gri...d-Fence/G0771Z


Any opinions about Laguna?
https://www.rockler.com/laguna-fusion-f1-table-saw

I think I'm leaning towards the Grizzly; larger motor and rip capacity.
Just be aware that Grizzly tools are made in China. I have some and like them, but after a couple years they no longer carry parts for some of them. But neither does Craftsman.

“Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.”
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post #14 of 19 Old 07-23-2020, 10:21 AM
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I have had a planer for about 10 years and it is still in the box. I have three band saws and they are used more than anything.

“Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.”
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post #15 of 19 Old 07-23-2020, 11:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RustyB View Post
I have had a planer for about 10 years and it is still in the box. I have three band saws and they are used more than anything.

Depends on what you do?

Wouldn't make more sense to specify what you do to buy a planer and leave in unopened box, or is I used and put back in the box each time?
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post #16 of 19 Old 07-23-2020, 11:43 AM
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I find a track saw more useful & safer for cutting sheet goods than a table saw. Also helpful you don't have a lot of outfeed room, or room to manipulate 4x8 sheets. You don't need an expensive system. You can make a perfectly functional DIY track saw guide.

Either one of the table saws you cited would be very good machines. I, too would lean toward the Grizzly for just the reasons you stated.
@RustyB Unless something has changed Grizzly machines are made in Taiwan. Just like Jet, Powermatic and just about every other brand, sometimes even in the same factory. For example, my 20" Grizzly planer looks identical to both Jet and Powermatic because they are cast in the same foundry in Taiwan.

You're going to want to run power to a subpanel in the shop. I recommend at least 50A capacity.

Robert
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post #17 of 19 Old 07-23-2020, 12:04 PM
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Originally Posted by DrRobert View Post
I find a track saw more useful & safer for cutting sheet goods than a table saw. Also helpful you don't have a lot of outfeed room, or room to manipulate 4x8 sheets. You don't need an expensive system. You can make a perfectly functional DIY track saw guide.

Either one of the table saws you cited would be very good machines. I, too would lean toward the Grizzly for just the reasons you stated.
@RustyB Unless something has changed Grizzly machines are made in Taiwan. Just like Jet, Powermatic and just about every other brand, sometimes even in the same factory. For example, my 20" Grizzly planer looks identical to both Jet and Powermatic because they are cast in the same foundry in Taiwan.

You're going to want to run power to a subpanel in the shop. I recommend at least 50A capacity.
He will regret a 50 amp box. If he had the ability and depending on his homestead panel . If he's lucky he has a 200 amp box which he could pull another 100 amp off of to the shop. Inexpensive in the long rum.
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post #18 of 19 Old 07-23-2020, 12:24 PM Thread Starter
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House just had a new 200 amp service panel installed outside the house last month. From what my realtor said, the company that did the upgrade is well known and respected in the area and also not cheap. The sellers had to pass my VA appraisal and they didn't want to take any chances. There's a small panel in the barn, I don't know what size or how old. I don't see me needing more than 50 amps ever, I don't use more than 1 tool at a time. Maybe the addition of a dust collector in the future.
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post #19 of 19 Old 07-23-2020, 12:35 PM
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Dust collector, air compressor, fans power plugs for cordless,more lights...you might want electric heat or air..

So your going to have 3 power sources. One for lights ect, one for a power tool and one dedicated to the DC...?
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