miter saw technique - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 13 Old 04-01-2016, 02:10 PM Thread Starter
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miter saw technique

Sorry for the basic question but just getting started. What is the proper cutting technique for a miter saw? I found that if I cut too quickly there is some splintering on the ends and if I cut too slowly there is slight burning. Advice on a good all-around saw blade would also be helpful.
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post #2 of 13 Old 04-02-2016, 04:45 PM
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Add a base and fence jig to the saw. Once fixed in place, it does for a miter saw what a ZCI does for a table saw.

there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.
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post #3 of 13 Old 04-03-2016, 10:12 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks, but I am looking for proper sawing technique so as not to splinter or burn the wood. Also, good all-around saw blade. I do not make fine furniture, more outdoor planters, trellis, etc. Cutting pressure treated lumber and cedar.
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post #4 of 13 Old 04-03-2016, 10:45 AM
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First thing I do is toss the blade that comes with the saw aside and put a better blade on. I typically use Freud diablo blades because they are the best blade I can buy locally. This alone will greatly reduce splintering.
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post #5 of 13 Old 04-03-2016, 10:50 AM
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On a miter it isn't going to hurt anything for it to burn. If the wood is burning though you either have a dull or bad blade. A good sharp blade shouldn't burn on a cross grain cut if you took all day to make the cut.
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post #6 of 13 Old 04-04-2016, 09:13 AM Thread Starter
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For general use how many teeth on the blade?
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post #7 of 13 Old 04-04-2016, 10:14 AM
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Add a base and fence jig to the saw. Once fixed in place, it does for a miter saw what a ZCI does for a table saw.
What is this?

George
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post #8 of 13 Old 04-04-2016, 11:29 AM
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IMO, proper tech encompasses all things mentioned above. The material being cut, species, grain pattern and wood density. Dull and or warped/unbalanced blades, sharp is useless when warped. ZCI and backer. Tuned MS. Any one of these points not considered and you end with unsatisfactory results.

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post #9 of 13 Old 04-04-2016, 12:39 PM
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I always start my saw, and allow it to run for a second or two, seems to stabilize and get up to speed. then slowly feed down through the work. hold, and release the switch. after the blade stops, I raise the saw.


a sacrificial fence does help reduce splintering.
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post #10 of 13 Old 04-04-2016, 01:22 PM
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What is this?

George


there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.
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post #11 of 13 Old 04-04-2016, 03:48 PM
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Zero Clearance Insert

Cut it twice, measure once and it's still too short.
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post #12 of 13 Old 04-04-2016, 05:15 PM
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Do you have one of those for each potential angle that you would cut on the saw? Seems like a lot to store.

George
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post #13 of 13 Old 04-05-2016, 10:31 AM
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I always start my saw, and allow it to run for a second or two, seems to stabilize and get up to speed. then slowly feed down through the work. hold, and release the switch. after the blade stops, I raise the saw.
This is, so far, the best answer for technique. If you're cutting dimensional lumber for a building project (i.e. 2x4s, etc.) then the technique typically is to start the saw, plunge it through the cut and cut it off after raising the blade to the upright position. That's fine for framing, but not for fine woodworking.

As stated, get the blade moving before you ease it in to the work piece and then, as you slowly lower it through the cut, release the trigger and do not raise the blade until after it stops and you have moved the work piece away from the blade.

Doing it this way prevents the blade from making any secondary contact with the piece you are trying to keep and you end up with far better results. Practice the technique before you get to your project pieces.

Oh, the part about a good, quality blade, will always hold true as well! The right blade for the job and, yes, you get what you pay for. Resist the temptation to buy a HF blade for $5 over a $15 blade from Home Depot. The extra $10 or so is worth it! There are many articles written on blade selection. Go with the best you can afford and you'll see what we're talking about is true, we're not just snobs who think the tools we choose are best over everything else!

One last thing, you can have carbide blade tips replaced or sharpened in most cases, cheaper than buying a new blade...just saying.

But the wisdom that is from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, and easy to be intreated, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality, and without hypocrisy. James 3:17
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