Miter Saw Blade Guard - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 21 Old 07-15-2019, 12:12 AM Thread Starter
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Miter Saw Blade Guard

Hi


I was wondering what you guys think about running a Miter Saw without the blade guard? I just recently got a Hitachi 10" Miter Saw Model: C10FA and I have found that the blade guard is always in the way, and I am always pulling it up to line up the blade for the next cut. I got fed up with it this morning and took it off.
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post #2 of 21 Old 07-15-2019, 12:41 AM
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I assume you are talking about the lower guard that retracts, I guess one could work without it, now if you want to experience real pucker factor watch a lady with long hair use one without any guard at all.

Went to my nephews to drop off some lumber he needed for a reno he was doing, when I walked into his yard his wife was cutting boards with a miter saw with no guard. I convinced her to wait until I returned with a saw with a guard before making any more cuts.

What really pee'd me off was the fact her father gave her the saw and said it was okay to use it, just be careful.

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post #3 of 21 Old 07-15-2019, 01:05 AM
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How much work could you do with only one hand?
thats your likely future.
Why do you think manufacturers are MADE by law to fit them?
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post #4 of 21 Old 07-15-2019, 01:41 AM Thread Starter
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Hi


I'm doing sub floor repair in my bedroom, and I have been operating the miter saw while it is sitting on the floor. I know I should have the saw up on some kind of a stand or saw horses, unfortunately I don't have either, so the floor is my only option for now and the retractable blade guard is a tad bit inconvenient while the saw is on the floor.. With the guard on I was always more concerned that I would accidentally grab the trigger while holding the guard up so I could line every thing up, my fingers were literally rubbing against the teeth of the blade while holding the guard out of the way, where as now with the guard removed my hands don't have to be anywhere close to the blade.
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post #5 of 21 Old 07-15-2019, 03:07 AM
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Its your fingers, its your decision.
The fact youre asking other peoples opinion shows you know youre pushing your luck.
Just remember this...
If you cut off any part of your hand with a machine that has a safety guard removed, your insurance and medical will laugh you out of court.
Can your bank balance afford that risk?
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post #6 of 21 Old 07-15-2019, 04:14 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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There's a middle ground .....

Quote:
Originally Posted by ajdragon View Post
Hi


I'm doing sub floor repair in my bedroom, and I have been operating the miter saw while it is sitting on the floor. I know I should have the saw up on some kind of a stand or saw horses, unfortunately I don't have either, so the floor is my only option for now and the retractable blade guard is a tad bit inconvenient while the saw is on the floor.. With the guard on I was always more concerned that I would accidentally grab the trigger while holding the guard up so I could line every thing up, my fingers were literally rubbing against the teeth of the blade while holding the guard out of the way, where as now with the guard removed my hands don't have to be anywhere close to the blade.

Here's an image grabbed off the web, like your saw? Notice the long fence:


First off, get up off the floor, it's just not safe. Use an old trashed out vanity, or a couple of saw horses and a piece of plywood screwed down to them. A Stanley Workmate or equivilant is a must have in any shop, less than $50.00:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07RLZZNGK...5-13ade7751b04

https://www.amazon.com/Performance-T...ateway&sr=8-28


https://www.ebay.com/p/Black-Decker-...d=173541402213



Secondly, ..... put the guard back on but tape or wire it up with a wedge inserted between the guard and the blade cover. If you don't do this and have the guard totally removed, ALL liability is gone. You are still AT RISK doing this, but somewhat less, just my opinion, but I'm no lawyer.

Having raised up the saw off the floor, it will be easier to see where the cut line is BUT I would make a sacrificial fence out of one long piece of 1 X scrap, bolt it or screw it on, securely on both sides of the blade. Then, cut through it leaving an exact kerf where your cut is. Now, you line up your mark to the kerf, NOT the blade, much safer and more accurate! You can probably leave the guard on without it being wedged up.
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 07-15-2019 at 04:27 AM.
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post #7 of 21 Old 07-15-2019, 05:29 AM
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A wedged guard is just as insurance voiding as no guard.
after cutting part of your hand off are you likely to remember to remove the wedge before the medics get to you?
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post #8 of 21 Old 07-15-2019, 06:57 AM
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I used several miter saws with no lower guard for 42 years and didn't get cut the first time. I did however have a 15 inch Hitachi miter saw that the hold up spring broke while blade was turning full rpm, head dropped just missed fingers. That was a close one, your call.

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post #9 of 21 Old 07-15-2019, 09:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajdragon View Post
Hi


I'm doing sub floor repair in my bedroom, and I have been operating the miter saw while it is sitting on the floor. I know I should have the saw up on some kind of a stand or saw horses, unfortunately I don't have either, so the floor is my only option for now and the retractable blade guard is a tad bit inconvenient while the saw is on the floor.. With the guard on I was always more concerned that I would accidentally grab the trigger while holding the guard up so I could line every thing up, my fingers were literally rubbing against the teeth of the blade while holding the guard out of the way, where as now with the guard removed my hands don't have to be anywhere close to the blade.

Can you align by positioning the wood and lowering the blade without pulling the trigger? Then you can align the teeth right to your cut line. Your hands never need to get closer than they do when you're making a cut.
I don't see how removing the guard would be more helpful.
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post #10 of 21 Old 07-15-2019, 10:12 AM
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My initial miter saw had a real janky guard and I ultimately removed it and then used it without incident for the next 20+ years. My new saw has a much better design for the guard and I am glad to leave it on and have the protection on my side. My point...some blade guard systems are much better than others, some of the old (20+ years old) guards were not well designed, so I understand the temptation to remove them.
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post #11 of 21 Old 07-15-2019, 10:32 AM
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I have a 12" Dewalt and when I have that issue on thick
pieces, I hold the plastic guard up with my thumb to get
on the mark, ensure the left hand is out of the way, start
the cut, drop the guard.
knowing where all your fingers are when cutting anything
goes without saying.
your shop = your call.

.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --
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post #12 of 21 Old 07-15-2019, 11:37 AM Thread Starter
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Hi


Thank you for your suggestions, and concerns. This question was more to figure thing out, I understand the safety aspect quite well, I am still learning the in's and outs of this type of saw. The only other experience I hive with this type of saw is from using a friends old 7 1/2" chop saw, which had no blade guard.



It never even down on my to make a sacrificial fence.

I do have a B&D Workmate 400 that I keep forgetting about, unfortunately it's one of my repair projects.
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post #13 of 21 Old 07-15-2019, 11:43 AM
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I don't have a blade guard on my table saw. For some reason, I wouldn't use my miter saw without one.

I expect we all use tools that came with guards without them. Anyone take the guard of a 4-1/2 inch offset grinder? Many guards are the result of lawsuits. Tools can be/are dangerous but many, if not all, can be safely run without the guard.

I worked in a punch press factory for a very short period of time as a young man. A guy left his fingers in a machine and they added guards to all the machines. Was it a reaction to the event? A sloppy employee? Too little, too late? A needed change? How much safety is a reaction to bad shop habits? How much is really vital to the safety of the operator?

In this, you are the one deciding in your shop.
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post #14 of 21 Old 07-18-2019, 11:05 PM
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Why not just repair it so that it retracts properly.
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post #15 of 21 Old 07-19-2019, 02:22 PM
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Do it right or don't do it!
Your excuse of not setting it up properly doesn't hold water.
If you get away with something 1000 times it entirely possible that 1001 will remove part of you.
Adding to that is the fact that you have very little experience and you've got the making of the 3 finger hand shake!
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post #16 of 21 Old 07-19-2019, 02:39 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by RogerInColorado View Post
Why not just repair it so that it retracts properly.

Hi


Is it supposed to retract, if so then something is missing on mine, the guard on mine stays down until the wood pushes it up.
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post #17 of 21 Old 07-19-2019, 02:44 PM
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Originally Posted by ajdragon View Post
Hi


Is it supposed to retract, if so then something is missing on mine, the guard on mine stays down until the wood pushes it up.

most have a linkage that lift the guard as the head is lowered. my dewalt's have thin slots you can look through - enough to see your mark and the blade edge. otherwise as someone stated. lift the guard and hold with (trigger) hand thumb for alignment process, then drop before pulling the trigger.
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post #18 of 21 Old 07-20-2019, 12:58 AM
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post #19 of 21 Old 07-20-2019, 09:45 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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The hidden danger .....

It's not so much about cutting down into the material because hopefully .... you won't have your fingers in the path of the blade, it's about what might happen with the material or your fingers until the blade comes to a stop. If you were to accidentally brush the material across the spinning blade, it will grab it and throw it down or back at you. Same goes for your fingers which will be missing ......

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #20 of 21 Old 07-20-2019, 11:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajdragon View Post
Hi I was wondering what you guys think about running a Miter Saw without the blade guard? I just recently got a Hitachi 10" Miter Saw Model: C10FA and I have found that the blade guard is always in the way, and I am always pulling it up to line up the blade for the next cut. I got fed up with it this morning and took it off.
I would not run a miter saw without the blade guard. Other people may feel differently and I respect their opinions, but I would not do it. It is challenging enough to do safe woodworking before you remove the very protections whose sole purpose is to keep us safe.

Sometimes I lift the guard to line up the cut when I use a miter saw. Most miter saw guards have a convenient thumb tab that makes raising the guard easy for lining up the cut. I never thought of it as an inconvenience worth removing the guard.
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