Members, looking for wiring help on radial arm saw - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 16 Old 05-09-2020, 09:04 PM Thread Starter
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Members, looking for wiring help on radial arm saw

Purchased. Craftsman/ Emerson 12" radial arm saw, circa 1970 or earlier and need wiring assistance. Was wired for 220v. Switching back to 110v. But all info I can find online doesn't help in full conversion back. I'm hoping someone has similar saw, 11329500, and can send pics off their 110v setup. I attached pics of what I have. Marked up a pic to what my current wire schematic is. Any help is greatly appreciated.
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post #2 of 16 Old 05-10-2020, 11:31 AM
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I have a craftsman 12" radial arm saw that I think I bought in 1974. It is a 220v model. The reason I purchased the 220v model is that I could run a 220/20 amp circuit for a lot less money than that of a 110v model. At 220v it required a 12 ga wire about 75 feet from my service panel. Everything was cheaper... the wire, the breaker, and the outlet.

Gary

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post #3 of 16 Old 05-10-2020, 12:07 PM
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All I can say is to make sure you keep track of how to change it back to 220 volts if you are not happy with the performance on 110, it is not a dual voltage motor for no reason. YMMV.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #4 of 16 Old 05-10-2020, 12:29 PM
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At 110v it requires twice the current draw which will be a problem most likely.

Gary

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post #5 of 16 Old 05-10-2020, 02:25 PM
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Possibly it's a 220 v only model.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by gmercer_48083 View Post
I have a craftsman 12" radial arm saw that I think I bought in 1974. It is a 220v model. The reason I purchased the 220v model is that I could run a 220/20 amp circuit for a lot less money than that of a 110v model. At 220v it required a 12 ga wire about 75 feet from my service panel. Everything was cheaper... the wire, the breaker, and the outlet.

I have at least one 12" saw that is 220 v only. That could be why you are missing wires and can't find any diagram for converting it to 110 v .... I donno?

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 05-10-2020 at 03:39 PM.
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post #6 of 16 Old 05-10-2020, 08:13 PM Thread Starter
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Unfortunately my garage/shop is running only on a 100amp box. Was planning on sticking with 110v setup. But we'll see. Thanks.
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post #7 of 16 Old 05-10-2020, 08:37 PM
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My shop is the same .... 100 AMP service

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Owen View Post
Unfortunately my garage/shop is running only on a 100amp box. Was planning on sticking with 110v setup. But we'll see. Thanks.

You do understand that the sum of the breaker amperages can exceed 100 AMPs? My 100 AMP panel is completely filled with breakers, a lot of doubles for 220 and about 10 singles for 120 outlets and lighting which are on separate circuits. All my 3 HP power tools, the 12" RAS, 3 table saws, planers, 18 " bandsaw and 24" drum sander are on dedicated 220 v circuits. I do not run them simultaneously and so there is never more than about 20 AMP current draw. You can do the same, you just need a 100 AMP panel with 24 or 30 slots. Square D QO series is what I use.



The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 05-10-2020 at 08:40 PM.
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post #8 of 16 Old 05-11-2020, 10:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
You do understand that the sum of the breaker amperages can exceed 100 AMPs? My 100 AMP panel is completely filled with breakers, a lot of doubles for 220 and about 10 singles for 120 outlets and lighting which are on separate circuits. All my 3 HP power tools, the 12" RAS, 3 table saws, planers, 18 " bandsaw and 24" drum sander are on dedicated 220 v circuits. I do not run them simultaneously and so there is never more than about 20 AMP current draw. You can do the same, you just need a 100 AMP panel with 24 or 30 slots. Square D QO series is what I use.


I agree with this post completely. Run a fresh dedicated 220 circuit (20 amp) for just your radial arm saw. Even if you convert the saw to 110... it would require a 40 amp circuit to run the saw. It would also require a much larger gage wire and outlet to run at 110 volts.

Gary

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post #9 of 16 Old 05-11-2020, 11:09 AM
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I have an owners manual 113.29510

Pretty much the same saw, can be wired for 120 v OR 220 volts. I found this sketch, probably for 220 V. The manual gives you written instructions and a diagram for either voltage. This is the best I can do without tearing off a motor wiring cover, but my saws are all 220 volts anyway, so no help there. I found a thread that show a 220 v photo:
https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f12/...roblem-161345/


For sale on Ebay showing wiring directions;
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 05-11-2020 at 11:27 AM.
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post #10 of 16 Old 05-11-2020, 11:22 AM
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similar saws of the same era used this.

The 113.29460 and the 113.29461 made in the early 70's used the orange and brown wire to make the voltage swap.
At the end of each wire there is a crimp-on 90 degree female spade connector that lands on a numbered terminal.

120v.
Orange on 6.
Brown on 5.

240v.
Orange on 8.
Brown on 7.

About electrical sub-panels. The rating of the panel does not determine the available amperage, that is determined by the size of the wire running to it, and if the feeder breaker is sized correctly it will tell you the available power.
You do not add up the sub panel circuit breakers, there is no relationship between the sum of the breakers and the branch circuit size to the sub panel. The NEC has tables you use for that.

I would like to see a couple photos of the inside of that sub panel and the inside of the feeder panel. I have never seen a 100 amp 120v sub panel, that would be unusual.

I am not going to get into a 120v vs 220v argument, but the fact is that a the windings of a dual voltage motor Always run at the lower voltage. The idea that a dual voltage motor somehow has more power at 220, all other things being equal, is a very persistent myth. I think sometimes people run saws on long wire runs that are not sized correctly, so voltage drop, replace with a 220 circuit and get much better performance.

My point is, if you have 120v close by and run the proper size wire it's all good, and not worth going to a lot of trouble to run a 220v circuit.
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post #11 of 16 Old 05-11-2020, 04:32 PM
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Hey Scott

Can you post a picture or the model number of the motor itself?


The motors sometimes got used on multiple models and some manuals were more detailed than others.


JayArr

Last edited by JayArr; 05-11-2020 at 07:10 PM.
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post #12 of 16 Old 05-11-2020, 07:33 PM
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This is from model 11329501 which may have the same motor. Look and see if your motor is model 63149.

Wiring instructions are on page 1!

1. Connections For 120-Volts AC. (See figure 1.) When
replacing a motor or connecting the saw to 120-volts
for any reason, make sure the wires inside the motor
terminal box are connected as follows:
a. Connect the YELLOW, WHITE, BLACK and RED leads
from the motor terminal box to the WHlTE motor cord lead. (The black motor cord l e a d is already-con
nected to the overload protector.)
b. Connect the GREEN and BROWN leads t o the BLUE lead.
c. Twist bare ends of wires together and install a wire
nut on each connection.
d. Push all leads carefully into motor terminal box a n d
install terminal box cover.

Last edited by JayArr; 05-11-2020 at 07:37 PM.
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post #13 of 16 Old 05-12-2020, 05:55 PM Thread Starter
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I thank you for the input. I miss spoke when I said I only have a 100 amp box. I have a 100 amp main in the box feeding the breakers. It is a 200 amp compatible box. I can go back to 220 if I absolutley have to but I figured the radial has no more draw than my air comp, which is 15 amp start up. But either way here is the cover plate off the motor. All of my service is 20amp breakers in garage except for lighting. I do have pics of what I'm working with on original post as well. Orange wire was not hooked to any post when received at 220 setup, nor was the brown. I don't, unfortunatley have pics before pulling the wires. Oops.
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post #14 of 16 Old 05-12-2020, 07:40 PM
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Excuse me for asking the obvious but did you read the front cover? !!!

The wiring connections for 120V and 240V are written right there!

For 110V:

Green and Blue to Brown
Red, Yellow, White and Black to White line lead

It really doesn't matter if you run it on 120V or 240V the power is the same:
240V * 6.5A = 1560W, 1560W/745 = 2.1HP
120V * 13A = 1560W, 1560W/745 = 2.1HP
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post #15 of 16 Old 05-12-2020, 08:56 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayArr View Post
Excuse me for asking the obvious but did you read the front cover? !!!

The wiring connections for 120V and 240V are written right there!

For 110V:

Green and Blue to Brown
Red, Yellow, White and Black to White line lead

It really doesn't matter if you run it on 120V or 240V the power is the same:
240V * 6.5A = 1560W, 1560W/745 = 2.1HP
120V * 13A = 1560W, 1560W/745 = 2.1HP
Yeap. Read the cover. Read the instruction manual. The primary issue I am facing is the wiring behind the cover plate does not fully match the diagrams. "red" wire when I received the unit is not where the instructions say, has a white lead there, and the orange wire is not called out, as many of the wires are not in the diagrams. The break stop in the diagram has 4 wires connected and the unit I have only has three, unless I'm not seeing it right, as seen in the images of the original post. If nothing else, if someone has the same internal guts as what I'm showing in the images, even set up for 220, I was hoping to see a few images of where their wires where connected. This way I can start fresh with a setup that is working. Thank you though.
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post #16 of 16 Old 05-12-2020, 10:37 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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How this photo?

I rebuilt a 12" RAS motor and took this before I got too far into it:
https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f12/...rebuild-35737/





The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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