Materials other than wood cut on TS? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 22Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #21 of 27 Old 12-02-2017, 09:45 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Having actually cut Plexi with a standard blade and it did melt and seize up, it's a safety issue as much as anything. Yes, that's an expensive Freud blade but here's why from the product description:
Special Grind and Negative Hook Angle Prevent Melting
Built to leave a crisp, high-quality finish when cutting acrylics, polycarbonates and other plastics, this blade features 80 teeth with a special, modified triple-chip grind. Based on the results of extensive computer simulations, this grind helps the blade stay cool while it cuts so your work surface never starts to melt. The blade's teeth also feature negative hook angles, which helps prevent the blade from being too aggressive and further reduces the possibility of melting or chipping.This blade is designed for optimal performance when cutting plastic and Plexiglass that ranges from 1/4 to 1-5/8 inches thick. This blade can also handle chipboard, plywood, or laminates, and it can tackle thinner or thicker materials. However, some loss of surface finish may occur when it is used outside its ideal range. It has a 5/8-inch arbor and produces a 0.110 kerf.


Take your chances with the standard blade if you want, but Plexi is not like wood, it shatters and produces knife sharp projectiles. Additionally, it won't weld itself to the blade like wood. It's scarier than any wood I've ever cut.
It's funny, I worked for a commercial fixture company that made hundreds of cube display cases out of plexiglass and I don't remember ever having an issue with the material melting on the blade. It's been too many years since then so I don't remember the specific blade. I can't even remember if we had the blade all the way up or barely through the plastic. When cutting formica I know we had the blade all the way up.

What is interesting is the sawn edge of plexiglass that shows on a display case you can pass an acetylene torch over it and it will look like the edge was sanded and polished.
new2woodwrk likes this.
Steve Neul is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 27 Old 12-02-2017, 10:24 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Panama City, Florida
Posts: 838
View new2woodwrk's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
If the plexiglass is going in a frame I wouldn't buy a special blade for it. There would just be a little chipping on the edge with a 40 tooth blade. You could also cut it a little oversized and machine the edges on a jointer or use a router.
Don't have a jointer or a router yet - actually I have hand router and an old craftsman, neither of which of done any real work with yet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by epicfail48 View Post
You only "have" to if you're still running a HSS blade in your saw, of if your blade is incredibly. A good condition standard wood cross-cut blade will work just fine
I do have am industrial 80 T blade I could use that is not one of my Freuds/Diablos. I've switch most of my saws to mfg now until I find another
new2woodwrk is offline  
post #23 of 27 Old 12-02-2017, 10:31 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
With a hand held router you could clamp a straightedge to the plastic and route it with a bearing trim bit .
new2woodwrk likes this.
Steve Neul is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #24 of 27 Old 12-02-2017, 10:36 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Panama City, Florida
Posts: 838
View new2woodwrk's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
With a hand held router you could clamp a straightedge to the plastic and route it with a bearing trim bit .
Yah, I guess - I haven't even used it yet - found a good deal on a Bosch so bought it while I could.

And the craftsman, scares the crap out of me lol - it's loud and heavy.

Until I do an actual project with either, they'll continue to collect dust - hoping I can find a class to teach me how to use them.
new2woodwrk is offline  
post #25 of 27 Old 12-02-2017, 10:43 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 765
View Terry Q's Photo Album My Photos
I cut THIN pieces of window plexiglass on occasion with no problem whatsoever. Didnít even consider any sort of problem, nor did anything happen that made me uncomfortable about doing so. I did use an old blade just in case, but I do that anytime Iím not comfortable cutting something (like repurposed lumber).


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
new2woodwrk likes this.
Terry Q is offline  
post #26 of 27 Old 12-02-2017, 10:44 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by new2woodwrk View Post
Yah, I guess - I haven't even used it yet - found a good deal on a Bosch so bought it while I could.

And the craftsman, scares the crap out of me lol - it's loud and heavy.

Until I do an actual project with either, they'll continue to collect dust - hoping I can find a class to teach me how to use them.
I know what you mean about the size and weight. I will use a laminate trimmer unless the job is too big for it.
new2woodwrk likes this.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #27 of 27 Old 12-02-2017, 11:09 AM
Ole Woodworker
 
BigJim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Chattanooga, Tennessee
Posts: 4,404
View BigJim's Photo Album My Photos
Another thought about plexi-glass, it will yellow over time and will show scratches easily, it also so cracks easily. Lexan is a much better choice IMHO, it don't scratch, break or yellow over time.
woodnthings and new2woodwrk like this.

http://www.diychatroom.com/
The Other
BigJim

If you do what you've always done, you will get what you've always got.
BigJim is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help choosing wood and tools for air rifle stock Zebra General Woodworking Discussion 6 11-08-2017 11:46 AM
Basic Techniques Wood Engraving purnomoadi General Woodworking Discussion 0 11-16-2015 02:43 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome